[SOLVED] Is this GPU for workstation use or?

Not totally worthless. These crossfire-on-a-stick cards were alright for most popular older DX11 titles. When they worked, they worked great. These cards, especially the model you linked then became extremely popular for mining farms. A gamer who plays modern DX12 games would not want these now because developers are just not supporting CF/SLI like they used to, and forcing it usually isn't possible anymore or isn't viable due to glitching, even on many newer DX11 titles. The last card like this was the Radeon Pro Duo if I remember correctly. It was a workstation card and probably used for massive compute.

It's possible that CF/SLI will make a comeback if GPU makers go to MCM configurations as rumored.
 
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Phaaze88

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Yeah. Nvidia had cards just like that one: the GTX 590 and 690: 2 GTX 580s and 680s in one.

Being an earlier implementation of a multi-gpu solution, they were fairly unstable, and weren't really worth it over the single one.
Back when I built my first PC(2012), I was considering the GTX 690. I read up on it... took a 680 instead.
 
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Yeah. Nvidia had cards just like that one: the GTX 590 and 690: 2 GTX 580s and 680s in one.

Being an earlier implementation of a multi-gpu solution, they were fairly unstable, and weren't really worth it over the single one.
Back when I built my first PC(2012), I was considering the GTX 690. I read up on it... took a 680 instead.
Also i would need to buy a really good powersupply for it.
It matches gtx 1080 in performance,but still 1000W psu with 4 pcie connectors doesnt come cheap also.And not consider the card costs a fortune.
But it looks sick i cant take that away from it.And the box looks so cool,just imagine it in a Vertical GPU config.Its possibly very very loud.
 
Not totally worthless. These crossfire-on-a-stick cards were alright for most popular older DX11 titles. When they worked, they worked great. These cards, especially the model you linked then became extremely popular for mining farms. A gamer who plays modern DX12 games would not want these now because developers are just not supporting CF/SLI like they used to, and forcing it usually isn't possible anymore or isn't viable due to glitching, even on many newer DX11 titles. The last card like this was the Radeon Pro Duo if I remember correctly. It was a workstation card and probably used for massive compute.

It's possible that CF/SLI will make a comeback if GPU makers go to MCM configurations as rumored.
 
Reactions: Djoza
Not totally worthless. These crossfire-on-a-stick cards were alright for most popular older DX11 titles. When they worked, they worked great. These cards, especially the model you linked then became extremely popular for mining farms. A gamer who plays modern DX12 games would not want these now because developers are just not supporting CF/SLI like they used to, and forcing it usually isn't possible anymore or isn't viable due to glitching, even on many newer DX11 titles. The last card like this was the Radeon Pro Duo if I remember correctly. It was a workstation card and probably used for massive compute.

It's possible that CF/SLI will make a comeback if GPU makers go to MCM configurations as rumored.
What would say is the modern equivalent to it? (in gaming performance)
1660Super?
Or something stronger?
 

Phaaze88

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Also i would need to buy a really good powersupply for it.
It matches gtx 1080 in performance,but still 1000W psu with 4 pcie connectors doesnt come cheap also.And not consider the card costs a fortune.
But it looks sick i cant take that away from it.And the box looks so cool,just imagine it in a Vertical GPU config.Its possibly very very loud.
As if 'gamers' care about power usage... :sneaky:

But in all seriousness, the big and beefy look was attractive.
 
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Phaaze88

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What would say is the modern equivalent to it? (in gaming performance)
1660Super?
Or something stronger?
It's hard to say because for gaming it would vary from game to game with some performing very well and others not so much. Keep in mind the RAM is not additive, it's mirrored, so often these configurations run into VRAM bottleneck even when they do work as intended. These are also based on the old 290x GPU which was only 2nd gen GCN, so some rendering features on newer cards will not be available. I would not drop much more than $150 in this card because it's so out of date. I saw some single 290s going for $50 on the overclock.net forums last week. This will be a labor of love project if you go this route.

If I had to guess performance wise, it would be similar to crossfire RX 570s, or one Vega, but only when you get high multi-GPU scaling. When CF not working it would be about an RX 570 for gaming. Compute is where a card like this will shine, folding, mining, ect. Lots of compute cores.
 
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It's hard to say because for gaming it would vary from game to game with some performing very well and others not so much. Keep in mind the RAM is not additive, it's mirrored, so often these configurations run into VRAM bottleneck even when they do work as intended. These are also based on the old 290x GPU which was only 2nd gen GCN, so some rendering features on newer cards will not be available. I would not drop much more than $150 in this card because it's so out of date. I saw some single 290s going for $50 on the overclock.net forums last week. This will be a labor of love project if you go this route.

If I had to guess performance wise, it would be similar to crossfire RX 570s, or one Vega, but only when you get high multi-GPU scaling. When CF not working it would be about an RX 570 for gaming. Compute is where a card like this will shine, folding, mining, ect. Lots of compute cores.
I currently have r9 380 4gb,would it be wise to buy a 390x down the line?
Since most of the new gpu's are way overpriced.
 
On the older chart is the slightly older 295x2 which was 2x 290x on one card. Similar but 390 is rebadged 290, so less cores. The chart is saying 295 was similar to GTX 1080, but that's best case scenario when CF is scaling properly. With the less shader units, it would probably be closer to like a FuryX, again when it's working right.

Upgrade from a 380? Meh. What's weird about that is that the 380 is a rebadged 285, aka Tonga, which is GCN 3rd gen. So while it's an upgrade in performance overall, it's one step backwards going from 3rd gen to 2nd gen, losing much efficiency. I know it's just horrible times to buy a graphics card, new or used. I watched my Vega 64 I bought used for $180 last year now goes for close to $1000 on ebay which is just insane to me. I'd sell some of my cards for cash but then I wouldn't be able to replace them with anything. I'm hoping some of the new 6000 Radeons get stock by summer, but I doubt it will happen or prices will still be crazy high.

My advice: hold what you got. Wait until you actually find a GOOD deal, whether it's new or used. You can tune game and driver settings to add more performance if you are lagging for now.
 
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On the older chart is the slightly older 295x2 which was 2x 290x on one card. Similar but 390 is rebadged 290, so less cores. The chart is saying 295 was similar to GTX 1080, but that's best case scenario when CF is scaling properly. With the less shader units, it would probably be closer to like a FuryX, again when it's working right.

Upgrade from a 380? Meh. What's weird about that is that the 380 is a rebadged 285, aka Tonga, which is GCN 3rd gen. So while it's an upgrade in performance overall, it's one step backwards going from 3rd gen to 2nd gen, losing much efficiency. I know it's just horrible times to buy a graphics card, new or used. I watched my Vega 64 I bought used for $180 last year now goes for close to $1000 on ebay which is just insane to me. I'd sell some of my cards for cash but then I wouldn't be able to replace them with anything. I'm hoping some of the new 6000 Radeons get stock by summer, but I doubt it will happen or prices will still be crazy high.

My advice: hold what you got. Wait until you actually find a GOOD deal, whether it's new or used. You can tune game and driver settings to add more performance if you are lagging for now.
By june i planning to move to i3 10100f from i3 3240,that first.Then ill consider upgrading my gpu.
I was just curious about the difference between 380 and 390x since on used market there is only 40-50$ difference.
 
By june i planning to move to i3 10100f from i3 3240,that first.Then ill consider upgrading my gpu.
I was just curious about the difference between 380 and 390x since on used market there is only 40-50$ difference.
Should be b 25% to 30% in GPU bound scenarios. I generally won't upgrade my personal graphics card unless it's 100% over what I have. Example: my last upgrades on my main machine were HD 6850 -> HD 7850 -> RX 570 -> Vega 56. Last week I gave up looking for a new card, and simply gave my Vega 56 a massive overclock, unlocking the power limit to over 400W for sustained clock speed 1775-1800MHz.
 
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Should be b 25% to 30% in GPU bound scenarios. I generally won't upgrade my personal graphics card unless it's 100% over what I have. Example: my last upgrades on my main machine were HD 6850 -> HD 7850 -> RX 570 -> Vega 56. Last week I gave up looking for a new card, and simply gave my Vega 56 a massive overclock, unlocking the power limit to over 400W for sustained clock speed 1775-1800MHz.
Dayum,how are the temps?
Do u have founder edition or?
 
Dayum,how are the temps?
Do u have founder edition or?
Right now temps are great, but it's abnormally cold weather and I had all the windows open and fans blowing at my test bench. I don't think GPU temp went over 40C. The Vega 56 is the special Gigabyte model with a flat heatpipe on the backplate. I did notice some very warm air getting exhausted from the card, but the cooler must have been doing its job very well.

I also have a Vega 64 with a reference cooler. That bitch just always runs hot.
 
Right now temps are great, but it's abnormally cold weather and I had all the windows open and fans blowing at my test bench. I don't think GPU temp went over 40C. The Vega 56 is the special Gigabyte model with a flat heatpipe on the backplate. I did notice some very warm air getting exhausted from the card, but the cooler must have been doing its job very well.

I also have a Vega 64 with a reference cooler. That bitch just always runs hot.
Are they better for gaming in terms of value than NVIDIA?
I saw that vega 56 is like gtx 1070 and 64 is 1080 something like that?
 
Are they better for gaming in terms of value than NVIDIA?
I saw that vega 56 is like gtx 1070 and 64 is 1080 something like that?
Not at the prices they are going for now. I bought my Vega 56 about 1 year ago for $240 NEW. Now the same card is over $600. Vega was never a good gaming card to begin with. It has a lot of shader units, but it is bandwidth starved and ROP limited. It's a very good compute card, which is why miners have driven the price up on any remaining stock.
 
Not at the prices they are going for now. I bought my Vega 56 about 1 year ago for $240 NEW. Now the same card is over $600. Vega was never a good gaming card to begin with. It has a lot of shader units, but it is bandwidth starved and ROP limited. It's a very good compute card, which is why miners have driven the price up on any remaining stock.
Yeah for sure
564euros,wow
For that you can SLI 2 1070Ti's on the used market in my country
 

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