[SOLVED] (Low-spec) Is going from 2 to 4 cores but lower clock speed better for gaming?

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
I've gone through this a couple times before about upgrading this particular computer, a Dell Inspiron 580. When I was reading the Dell forum, I found new information that the Intel Core i5 760 was compatible with this PC. It currently has a i3 550. The i3 is 2 cores at 3.2 GHz, and the i5 760 is 4 cores at 2.8 GHz.

My question is that would the i5 760 give me any gaming performance increase because it's a quad-core, and how much does the clock speed decrease from the i3 impact performance?

Specifically, how much would this impact CPU-dependent games, if at all?

I know I can build a new solid budget gaming PC for cheap, but I already have a gaming PC and was wondering if this inexpensive used CPU could bolster my secondary system.

Thanks!
 
Sep 29, 2019
26
3
45
2
Go with the i5. If you're playing games that make use of multiple cores, you're better of with the 4 cores. You'll also need the extra cores to run background windows services and others.
 
Reactions: Rdslw

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
I wouldn’t waste money buying a 4core CPU. If you have money for a new system then that’s what I would go with. It looks like they are around $19 so guess it wouldn’t hurt to try if you are ok with that performance, but we’re talking about a 9.5 year old CPU.
Thanks for the reply! I don't really need a new system right now and I'm just trying to see how much I can get out of this one. I usually only play old or easy to run games on it, so having something high-performance is not really important for it. I found out that the i5 760 can turbo to 3.3 GHz, so I might go for it to get the extra cores at basically the same clock speed. If I did get the 760, would I need to get a new cooler since I'd be going from 73 W to 95 W TDP? The current cooler is this.
 

mitch074

Distinguished
Thanks for the reply! I don't really need a new system right now and I'm just trying to see how much I can get out of this one. I usually only play old or easy to run games on it, so having something high-performance is not really important for it. I found out that the i5 760 can turbo to 3.3 GHz, so I might go for it to get the extra cores at basically the same clock speed. If I did get the 760, would I need to get a new cooler since I'd be going from 73 W to 95 W TDP? The current cooler is this.
The cooler you have should be barelly sufficient - as long as you keep it clean and well ventilated it should work, but I personally wouldn't trust it for any high, long load.

Turbo boosting will probably end with throttling.
 

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
The cooler you have should be barelly sufficient - as long as you keep it clean and well ventilated it should work, but I personally wouldn't trust it for any high, long load.

Turbo boosting will probably end with throttling.
So if I want to utilize turbo boost, I should look for a better cooler?
 

mitch074

Distinguished
So if I want to utilize turbo boost, I should look for a better cooler?
Probably, yes - the original Dell cooler seems to be a simple aluminum block with a powerful fan on top, I'd get something with a similar size but with a copper core and/or a vapor chamber. I mean, you COULD keep the current one and make use of turbo boost, but then you'd probably need to keep the case open.
 
Obviously case and airflow will play a large part with ANY cpu cooler used. In normal situations the stock cooler will work perfectly fine. Absolute worst case scenario is you realize you want to get something better in the future. In my opinion, you’d be better off with a better case than a better cpu cooler but your issue lies in the proprietary power button dell uses on its motherboards.
 
Sep 29, 2019
26
3
45
2
Go with the i5. If you're playing games that make use of multiple cores, you're better of with the 4 cores. You'll also need the extra cores to run background windows services and others.
 
Reactions: Rdslw

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
Probably, yes - the original Dell cooler seems to be a simple aluminum block with a powerful fan on top, I'd get something with a similar size but with a copper core and/or a vapor chamber. I mean, you COULD keep the current one and make use of turbo boost, but then you'd probably need to keep the case open.
Do you think that the motherboard has a standard 1156 mounting system or does it have something proprietary?

I've found two coolers that look good to me if I need to get a better one later on like bmockeg says, the Thermaltake Gravity i2 or the Rosewill RCX-Z300. The Rosewill has a copper core base(?) and would maybe be better but is more expensive. If the mounting system is standard, would I need to remove the whole mobo to install a cooler like the Gravity to access the back? I assume one that has those push pins would be able to install just from the front.
 
Last edited:
Do you think that the motherboard has a standard 1156 mounting system or does it have something proprietary?

I've found two coolers that look good to me if I need to get a better one later on like bmockeg says, the Thermaltake Gravity i2 or the Rosewill RCX-Z300. The Rosewill has a copper core base(?) and would maybe be better but is more expensive. If the mounting system is standard, would I need to remove the whole mobo to install a cooler like the Gravity to access the back? I assume one that has those push pins would be able to install just from the front.
You’ll have to remove the motherboard to install anything with a backplate. I haven’t read anything that leads me to believe that you will have an issue with that cooler. CURRENT intel stock coolers are not sufficient but that has nothing to do with CPUs from 2010.
 

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
You’ll have to remove the motherboard to install anything with a backplate. I haven’t read anything that leads me to believe that you will have an issue with that cooler. CURRENT intel stock coolers are not sufficient but that has nothing to do with CPUs from 2010.
It looks like my current cooler is installed with screws, so does that mean it has a backplate currently? If so, if I took off the current cooler, would the backplate be rattling around behind the mobo, so either way I'd have to remove the mobo for a new cooler? In that case, I'd just go with the Gravity i2, if it's sufficient.
 
It looks like my current cooler is installed with screws, so does that mean it has a backplate currently? If so, if I took off the current cooler, would the backplate be rattling around behind the mobo, so either way I'd have to remove the mobo for a new cooler? In that case, I'd just go with the Gravity i2, if it's sufficient.
Depends, proprietary motherboard so the backplate may be part of the motherboard, not sure. Either way make sure there is clearance for any cooler before buying.
 

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
The plan for now is to buy just the i5 and when I install it, check for the whole backplate situation, and go from there if I need a new cooler.
 

Third-Eye

Distinguished
Do you think that the motherboard has a standard 1156 mounting system or does it have something proprietary?

I've found two coolers that look good to me if I need to get a better one later on like bmockeg says, the Thermaltake Gravity i2 or the Rosewill RCX-Z300. The Rosewill has a copper core base(?) and would maybe be better but is more expensive. If the mounting system is standard, would I need to remove the whole mobo to install a cooler like the Gravity to access the back? I assume one that has those push pins would be able to install just from the front.
How large is your computer case? If you have the room for one, you may be better off spending $25-35 for a 90-120mm tower cooler that is capable of 125-150watt cooling. The the Deepcool GAMMAXX 400 is usually $25. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo is a good option if the GAMMAXX 400 is unavailable and is usually around $30-35 and sometimes has $10 rebates. Both of those coolers are 120MM towers and there are other good 90-92mm tower coolers from both brands that are good as well like the GAMMAXX 200 or Hyper T2. The coolers you picked are only 95 watt and are not going to be much better than the stock cooler if at all. The CPU you want to use is a 95 watt tdp CPU so you need a cooler that cools more than 95 watt if you want to have better temperatures.
 

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
How large is your computer case? If you have the room for one, you may be better off spending $25-35 for a 90-120mm tower cooler that is capable of 125-150watt cooling. The the Deepcool GAMMAXX 400 is usually $25. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo is a good option if the GAMMAXX 400 is unavailable and is usually around $30-35 and sometimes has $10 rebates. Both of those coolers are 120MM towers, there are other good 90-92mm tower coolers from both brands that are good as well like the GAMMAXX 200 or Hyper T2. The coolers you picked are only 95 watt and are not going to be much better than the stock cooler if at all. The CPU you want to use is a 95 watt tdp CPU so you need a cooler that cools more than 95 watt if you want to have better temperatures.
That's a good point. Even though it's Dell the case is pretty standard mATX. In terms of clearance, the cooler can't really extend much past the imaginary square created by the cooler mounting holes.
 

smmm

Great
Aug 14, 2019
129
3
95
1
I had a janky idea for airflow. I could cut a large square or rectangle out of the side panel with a dremel or something and replace it with mesh. I might be able to keep using the stock cooler then.
 

Third-Eye

Distinguished
I had a janky idea for airflow. I could cut a large square or rectangle out of the side panel with a dremel or something and replace it with mesh. I might be able to keep using the stock cooler then.
What is the model of the Dell? If it can't fit a 92mm tower cooler you could always get a good quality slim case cooler.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS