Question need a good USB 2.0 hub with own power source

Irene_16

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Aug 7, 2017
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What is a good reliable 2.0 USB Hub with its own power source and where is the best place to get one?
 
USB hubs tend to be consumables - what you can buy today does not necessary mean you can buy tomorrow. You're asking for poweed model - how many ports you need, and what you'll be connecting there?

On your question - go to Amazon, search, check rewiev.
 

Irene_16

Commendable
Aug 7, 2017
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I need one for my Toshiba Satellite laptop as the USB ports, and keyboard are basically trash.
Therefore, I only have one USB port that works and I want to use an external monitor, backup drive, headphone, and other such items. I would assume four USB slots would work. Ihave a USB Hub but it does not have its own power and I was told I needed power one. I see ones at Walmart and Amazon for under $20.00 but the reviews say does not last and te ones I hae have lasted years (no external power source though).
So can you tel me a good one?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
I can't help much, but I share your frustration. I searched several on-line sellers' websites for "powered USB Hub", and got huge lists of ALL USB hubs (mostly USB3 with added charging ports) and most NOT with a power supply unit!

Even those that have power "bricks" generally cheap out with low-rated power supplies. Just a note on checking that last detail. A USB2 standard port must be able to supply 0.5 A max at 5 VDC to each port. For USB3, that is raised to 0.9 A max per port. What makes this tricky at first is that many come with power supply modules outputting 12 VDC and some amperage (or wattage) max rating. Apparently the hub does the voltage conversion. So if your USB3 hub with NO charging ports is to meet specs, it should come with a power supply able to provide 5 VDC at 0.9 A PER PORT - that is, 4.5 W per port. Add a bit for voltage conversion loss, and I call that 5 W per port. So with NO extra charging ports, the power supply included should provide at least 20 W for a 4-port Hub (1.7A at 12 VDC), or 30 W for a 6-port unit (2.5 A at 12 VDC). If it claims to have high-output charging ports, the extra current for those ports must increase the requirements for the power supply module accordingly.

Finding USB2 hubs is getting harder these days as the market changes. Although you do not need it, OP, a USB3 hub will do the job also. It WILL plug into a standard USB2 port and work, although only at the older slower USB3 data transfer rate. Eventually you may find the USB3 level useful in newer equipment.
 

Irene_16

Commendable
Aug 7, 2017
11
0
1,510
0
I can't help much, but I share your frustration. I searched several on-line sellers' websites for "powered USB Hub", and got huge lists of ALL USB hubs (mostly USB3 with added charging ports) and most NOT with a power supply unit!

Even those that have power "bricks" generally cheap out with low-rated power supplies. Just a note on checking that last detail. A USB2 standard port must be able to supply 0.5 A max at 5 VDC to each port. For USB3, that is raised to 0.9 A max per port. What makes this tricky at first is that many come with power supply modules outputting 12 VDC and some amperage (or wattage) max rating. Apparently the hub does the voltage conversion. So if your USB3 hub with NO charging ports is to meet specs, it should come with a power supply able to provide 5 VDC at 0.9 A PER PORT - that is, 4.5 W per port. Add a bit for voltage conversion loss, and I call that 5 W per port. So with NO extra charging ports, the power supply included should provide at least 20 W for a 4-port Hub (1.7A at 12 VDC), or 30 W for a 6-port unit (2.5 A at 12 VDC). If it claims to have high-output charging ports, the extra current for those ports must increase the requirements for the power supply module accordingly.

Finding USB2 hubs is getting harder these days as the market changes. Although you do not need it, OP, a USB3 hub will do the job also. It WILL plug into a standard USB2 port and work, although only at the older slower USB3 data transfer rate. Eventually you may find the USB3 level useful in newer equipment.
I found one but I do not really understand what is needed can you look at this one?https://www.techtoolsupply.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=NCO-UA66Q&source=googleps&gclid=CjwKCAjwvZv0BRA8EiwAD9T2VUO1TaS5F3_bwxPcDqF-BgF9YK7TNRPhzT3ambWyfJy1nhF2Suom2hoCZzwQAvD_BwE
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
I doubt that is what you want. From its name and desciption, that item appears to be a high-power CHARGER only, with no actual USB data transfer capabilities listed. The USB system has been used for so many things including charging up actual USB data devices, it has been diverted into non-computer applications also. I see electrically-heated coffe mugs for use in cars using a USB2 connector system to provide power to the mug with absolutely not data-related functions at all, for example. Similarly, many phones, MP3 Players, Pedometers, etc. use USB connetions for both charging and data transfer, but sometimes you only need to charge them up, and that still needs a connection to a USB port. So lots of times now, people are using USB connections for charging only, and especially for charging fast-charge devices that need nore power than a normal USB port can provide. That is what this Nitecore charger appears to be.

Your original post concerned only ability to connect real data devices, recognizing that these do require some power to operate. But I do not think you were searching for a charger-only device.
 

Irene_16

Commendable
Aug 7, 2017
11
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1,510
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No I just need a USB hub with its own power source to work on a trash Toshiba Satellite C55T-A5102 older model laptop 2016? as only one usb 2.0 works and none of the others including the one to plug into the modem directly. I do not know enough about what to look for obviously.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Well, since you really are looking mainly for USB2 ports to connect a few peripherals, you don't need anything that gives you high-power charging ports. That MAY be difficult to avoid, since that's such a popular added feature. Most such ports, though, can operate as normal USB ports if you plug into them a simple device like a mouse - they just have the ability IF it is needed to provide higher-than-standard power to a device (like a smart phone) that has the ability to request such higher power.

There is a real reason that the makers of powered USB Hubs provide power "bricks" that are not rated high enough, besides trying to save money on the manufacturing costs. They make the assumption (usually justified) that the user may plug in devices on all the Hub's ports, but several of them will NOT need the max power of its port, and the user may not even be using all the connected devices at once. So the total power consumption of the hub is less that the number you get from multiplying the number of ports by the max power spec for each port, as I did above. Still, buyers need to be aware of this design choice.

Items like your keyboard and mouse consume much less than the max allowed for a USB2 port. In the near term, if you get a USB3 Hub (it's easier to find) with a power "brick" able to supply most of the requirements of that newer spec (much higher current limit per port), the current limit for using USB2 devices on it is even less of a concern. One item you have mentioned that MIGHT require power close to the USB2 port limit of 0.5 A at 5 VDC (2.5 W) is the modem. That has more circuitry and complexity that an mouse or keyboard, but I suspect it will conform to that USB2 limit.

I will caution you about the "backup drive" you mentioned. ALL hard drives can NOT get enough power for their operation from a single standard USB2 port. IF you have an external drive designed for use on a USB port, special arrangements are involved. All such "laptop drives" are designed to use as little power as they can, but that is NOT so if you get a common external drive unit for a desktop system. Those desktop units may have a USB2 or USB3 cables from then, but they also should come with their own "power brick" because they need more power than even is available from the new USB3 ports.

But back to "laptop drive". The original ones designed for USB2 ports had two options for getting sufficient power. One was to supply it with a "power brick" that you MUST use with the unit. Alternatively, some were supplied with a special USB2 cable that had TWO plugs on one end, and you had to plug BOTH into two USB ports so it could get enough power that way - two port's worth. Now, however, the new "laptop drives" designed for use with USB3 ports normally CAN operate solely on the power from such a port, so they do NOT come with their own "power brick" or any special USB2 two-headed cable. BUT they are a bit deceptive in their desriptions, because they often say they are "USB2 compatible". What that really means is that they technically CAN communicate with a USB2 port, BUT that does NOT include getting enough power to do that job. IF you try to use a new "USB3 laptop drive" on a USB2 port it can NOT get enough power from such a port. You need either a unit that does come with its own "power brick", or you need to search out one of those old double-headed USB2 cables. BUT there's also a third option, and I know this works because I've done it. If you buy a POWERED USB3 Hub and use the included USB3 cable to plug the USB3 laptop drive into that Hub, the Hub's ports CAN supply the higher power of 0.9 A that the drive unit IS able to work with. When you connect the Hub to a USB2 port on your laptop computer, the data transfer rate will only be the slower USB2 rate. BUT the power needed to run the "laptop drive" WILL be supplied by the powered USB3 Hub, and it works. So that's another eason to buy a USB3 powered hub, and not keep looking for a USB2 Hub.
 

Irene_16

Commendable
Aug 7, 2017
11
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As you stated in your first reply to me - there are many USB hubs without power and I am very confused about everything what you have been so kind to try and explain to me. I was told that a external drive was good and I have been using it and did not know it uses battery faster and I am limited on that anyway.

Can you please provide me with a brand name or some thing like that so I can search as I really do not understand what I need to not wipe out my battery and not take so long. thank you
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
So, you have an external drive you have been using. Just so I understand, can you tell me what maker and model number for that drive? Does it have its own "power brick", or does it have only one cable to the USB port and no separate power cord?

I looked up a few USB3 powered Hubs, links below. All are close to what you need. The 4-port ones typically come with power supplies for 5 VDC at 3 A (15 W), whereas the 7-port units come with a bigger power supply of 5 VDC at 4 A (20 W). So even though you don't need seven ports, you might be better getting that size for the better power supply module. The Atolla brand units all have individual on / off switches for each port in case that is useful for you. The Wavlink model lacks that feature, but has a sturdy aluminum case.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MQDJLSF/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2KVFO4XQ2RAFL&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B083XTKV8V/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=A26XYA9YAPOMV5&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07G8CMR18/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=A2KVFO4XQ2RAFL&psc=1

https://www.newegg.com/atolla-ch-207u3-usb/p/0J2-00GN-00043?Item=9SIACU69TU8099

https://www.newegg.com/wavlink-uh3074-usb/p/0J2-008P-00007?Item=9SIA6PF3C96458
 

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