Question New build powers on for 1 minute, shuts off, repeast. No boot or post

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
I press the power button, it turns on for 63s then turns off for 4s, turns itself back on and repeats
Evga 2070 XC
i9-9900k
Asrock Taichi Z390
Corsair vengeance pro 2x16 3200 - In A2 and B2 slots
Lian-li PC-011Dynamic
6 Corsair HD120 case fans
H150i Pro
Corsair RM850

Just tried switching the RAM to the A1 B1 slots but the same result.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Does it do that with only ONE stick of memory, installed in the second DIMM slot over from the CPU socket?

And then with the other stick of memory in the same socket?

Any Q codes or beeps?

Do you have some part of your AIO cooler connected to the CPU_FAN header at all?

How long has that RM 850 been in service?

Have you pulled the CPU and motherboard to double check that there are no bent pins in the CPU socket and that there is not a motherboard standoff in the wrong place between the motherboard and case?

Any error lights on?
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
Does it do that with only ONE stick of memory, installed in the second DIMM slot over from the CPU socket?

And then with the other stick of memory in the same socket?

Any Q codes or beeps?

Do you have some part of your AIO cooler connected to the CPU_FAN header at all?

How long has that RM 850 been in service?

Have you pulled the CPU and motherboard to double check that there are no bent pins in the CPU socket and that there is not a motherboard standoff in the wrong place between the motherboard and case?

Any error lights on?
I tried the 1 stick of RAM also.

No codes or beeps.

AIO coller is connected to the CPU fan/case fan watercooler header.(there are 2 CPU fan headers)

PSU is about 4 years old.

Have not pulled the CPU or motherboard. Did double check the connections going from the MOBO to PSU.

Thank you for all your help. It's frustrating. Took apart my son's CPU 2 days ago to do this new build and now this.

On a side note, all fans spin, RGB's on MOBO, AIO cooler, and GPU light up. Not on the RAM sticks though.
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
I am getting an error... I didn't realize it shows it on the MOBO below the GPU.

55, "memory could not be detected, please re-install the memory and CPU. If problem still exists, please install only 1 memory module or try using other memory modules."

I tried the 1 memory so now I'm going to try and re-install the CPU.
 

Nemesia

Notable
Nov 6, 2019
1,123
199
940
31
I am getting an error... I didn't realize it shows it on the MOBO below the GPU.

55, "memory could not be detected, please re-install the memory and CPU. If problem still exists, please install only 1 memory module or try using other memory modules."

I tried the 1 memory so now I'm going to try and re-install the CPU.
Are you seating the memory until you hear a click where the brackets close by itself?
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
Are you seating the memory until you hear a click where the brackets close by itself?
No, I have to close the bracket myself.

Now I just found this RAM isn't supported on their site's QVL list.

Corsair CMW32GX4M2C3200C16. I can't believe this!

The only other RAM I have her is some G.Skill Trident X DDR3 2133mhz.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You can't use DDR3.

It doesn't EVER matter if a memory kit isn't listed on the motherboard QVL. The QVL is useless anyhow other than if your memory IS listed on there. And even then, unless it SPECIFICALLY indicates that it's been tested at the XMP profile speed and timings, then it has only been verified to work at the default JEDEC configuration for that kit, which is generally 2133mhz for DDR4 but could go as high as 2666mhz for some Intel platforms.

It is always better to check the memory manufacturers compatibility listings. Corsair has the Corsair memory finder and G.Skill has the G.Skill memory configurator. Others have their own compatibility listings.

Corsair's memory finder says that kit is NOT compatible with your motherboard though. This kit, CMW32GX4M2Z3200C16, is however. I would recommend that you return your current kit and purchase a kit that is compatible.

Honestly, I think you'll have more success with a G.Skill kit as they seem to have better compatibility with a broader range of platforms and CPUs, but that is up to you. Whatever you do, verify first that it is compatible with that specific motherboard first, using the Corsair memory finder or G.Skill memory configurator. Filter results down based on motherboard, capacity, number of modules, memory kit speed and desired latency/timings.
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
You can't use DDR3.

It doesn't EVER matter if a memory kit isn't listed on the motherboard QVL. The QVL is useless anyhow other than if your memory IS listed on there. And even then, unless it SPECIFICALLY indicates that it's been tested at the XMP profile speed and timings, then it has only been verified to work at the default JEDEC configuration for that kit, which is generally 2133mhz for DDR4 but could go as high as 2666mhz for some Intel platforms.

It is always better to check the memory manufacturers compatibility listings. Corsair has the Corsair memory finder and G.Skill has the G.Skill memory configurator. Others have their own compatibility listings.

Corsair's memory finder says that kit is NOT compatible with your motherboard though. This kit, CMW32GX4M2Z3200C16, is however. I would recommend that you return your current kit and purchase a kit that is compatible.

Honestly, I think you'll have more success with a G.Skill kit as they seem to have better compatibility with a broader range of platforms and CPUs, but that is up to you. Whatever you do, verify first that it is compatible with that specific motherboard first, using the Corsair memory finder or G.Skill memory configurator. Filter results down based on motherboard, capacity, number of modules, memory kit speed and desired latency/timings.

Just tried another RAM, G.Skill Trident Z 2x16gb 3000mhz..... Same result
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
Thank
Thank you. I'll read that when I get home in just a little bit. Just wanted to mention, tried a 3rd new RAM, Corsair Vengence XLP 2x16gb 3200mhz(actually on Asrock's QVL list. Same error code.

But if I only have the power chord plugged and no display port and no USB's in the back, the PC starts up louder like fans where higher. For 1 second and gives a 7F error code. Then the fans lower back down in RPM, gives error 55 and stays that way for 30 second till it boot loops. Then starts low again and won't repeat the 7F code unless I use the power button to power it down and restart it.
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
Thank


Thank you. I'll read that when I get home in just a little bit. Just wanted to mention, tried a 3rd new RAM, Corsair Vengence XLP 2x16gb 3200mhz(actually on Asrock's QVL list. Same error code.

But if I only have the power chord plugged and no display port and no USB's in the back, the PC starts up louder like fans where higher. For 1 second and gives a 7F error code. Then the fans lower back down in RPM, gives error 55 and stays that way for 30 second till it boot loops. Then starts low again and won't repeat the 7F code unless I use the power button to power it down and restart it.
Turns out, contrary to the manual stating to install the RAM in the A2 B2 slots, they needed to be in the A1 B1 slots. I could say so much more about this ASRock compared to others but I'm just gonna put it in my rear view mirror.

With that said, thank you VERY much for your time with troubleshooting this.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Then there is something wrong with your hardware. Either there are bent pins on the motherboard or the motherboard is faulty, or the CPU cooler is not installed correctly and is leveraging more pressure against one area than the rest of the CPU socket, or something is shorted out somewhere, because there are NO, ZERO, NONE, NADA, dual channel motherboards that use the A1 and B1 DIMM slots for primary two DIMM population. None. Not if it uses DDR3 or DDR4 and is a dual channel architecture.

In every case where the A2 and B2 slots could not be used, there was an underlying hardware issue. I'd pull it all back apart and find out WHICH of these issues it has, because using it the way it is now, even though it may seem to be working normally, is just wearing rose colored glasses. There is NO chance that the A1 and B1 DIMM slots are the correct slots for two DIMM population, on this or any other board. That is by design, and is intentional. It does not change from board to board. It is part of the OVERALL design of modern hardware and it applies to both AMD and Intel motherboards where the architecture is four DIMM slot dual channel.

Either that, or you are simply mistaken on which slots you are actually using. Starting at the CPU socket and going left to right, the second and fourth DIMM slots should be the ones in use, with the fourth DIMM slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard.

If you cannot use those slots but you can use the 1st and 3rd slots, then something is faulty somewhere. It is not intended to be that way by design.
 

jordanzs

Prominent
Dec 14, 2018
38
0
530
0
Then there is something wrong with your hardware. Either there are bent pins on the motherboard or the motherboard is faulty, or the CPU cooler is not installed correctly and is leveraging more pressure against one area than the rest of the CPU socket, or something is shorted out somewhere, because there are NO, ZERO, NONE, NADA, dual channel motherboards that use the A1 and B1 DIMM slots for primary two DIMM population. None. Not if it uses DDR3 or DDR4 and is a dual channel architecture.

In every case where the A2 and B2 slots could not be used, there was an underlying hardware issue. I'd pull it all back apart and find out WHICH of these issues it has, because using it the way it is now, even though it may seem to be working normally, is just wearing rose colored glasses. There is NO chance that the A1 and B1 DIMM slots are the correct slots for two DIMM population, on this or any other board. That is by design, and is intentional. It does not change from board to board. It is part of the OVERALL design of modern hardware and it applies to both AMD and Intel motherboards where the architecture is four DIMM slot dual channel.

Either that, or you are simply mistaken on which slots you are actually using. Starting at the CPU socket and going left to right, the second and fourth DIMM slots should be the ones in use, with the fourth DIMM slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard.

If you cannot use those slots but you can use the 1st and 3rd slots, then something is faulty somewhere. It is not intended to be that way by design.
Then there is something wrong with your hardware. Either there are bent pins on the motherboard or the motherboard is faulty, or the CPU cooler is not installed correctly and is leveraging more pressure against one area than the rest of the CPU socket, or something is shorted out somewhere, because there are NO, ZERO, NONE, NADA, dual channel motherboards that use the A1 and B1 DIMM slots for primary two DIMM population. None. Not if it uses DDR3 or DDR4 and is a dual channel architecture.

In every case where the A2 and B2 slots could not be used, there was an underlying hardware issue. I'd pull it all back apart and find out WHICH of these issues it has, because using it the way it is now, even though it may seem to be working normally, is just wearing rose colored glasses. There is NO chance that the A1 and B1 DIMM slots are the correct slots for two DIMM population, on this or any other board. That is by design, and is intentional. It does not change from board to board. It is part of the OVERALL design of modern hardware and it applies to both AMD and Intel motherboards where the architecture is four DIMM slot dual channel.

Either that, or you are simply mistaken on which slots you are actually using. Starting at the CPU socket and going left to right, the second and fourth DIMM slots should be the ones in use, with the fourth DIMM slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard.

If you cannot use those slots but you can use the 1st and 3rd slots, then something is faulty somewhere. It is not intended to be that way by design.
After trying 3 different set of RAM's, I took it to UBREAKIFIX(Chicago area). They told me about the RAM, said it should always start at the slot closest to the CPU. The guy who told me that helped greatly with an intermittent BSOD issue last year, so I trusted him with this new build.

Before I took the build there, I swapped 3 different brand RAM's, uninstalled and reinstalled the RAM, MOBO, CPU, and CPU AIO cooler.

Should I just return the MOBO for defects, or return the MOBO and CPU for defects and get new one's? If so, I'll stick with the I9-9900k but will go with a different MOBO.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'm glad you got it working, however, they are wrong. It's not surprising, since about 50% of the time that I listen to something one of the repair shop employees says to a customer or one of the geek squad, micro center type technicians, it's often blatantly false.

Any employee who told you that memory should be populated starting at the closest slot to the CPU should be fired, for being an idiot who hasn't the slightest clue what they are talking about.

Take a look at EVERY DDR4 motherboard user manual for any motherboard that has four DIMMs. They will ALL show the second and fourth slots as the two that are required to be populated FIRST, when using only two DIMMs and will always either show the second slot over from the CPU being populated first if only one DIMM is used, or showing the FURTHEST slot away from the CPU in the case of ASUS X570 motherboards.

This is not up for argument, by anybody. Repair shop or not. It is the standard and is employed by all motherboard manufacturers across the board. Well, at the very least, it is definitely employed by all the major manufacturers. ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, ASRock, Supermicro, EVGA, ALL designate the same population recommendations EXCEPT for the very recent ASUS X570 motherboards as I've explained. Even then, they STILL recommend using the second and fourth slots, they just switched which slots they recommend using first when only one DIMM is used.

This is not because manufacturers just happen to "like" those slots. It's because that is the way the architecture for dual channel motherboards, both DDR4 and MOST DDR3 assuming motherboards released after memory designs changed from low density chips to high density chips, and from what I've seen, even the majority of those from before that on the DDR3 platform. For DDR4, there are ZERO exceptions from what I have seen and there have been extensive arguments by those who think they know better based on some misleading information contained in some user manuals however in ALL of the user manuals the population rules graphic shows exactly the same thing. And, based on some memory deep dive documentation we've seen, and further conversations with helpful individuals who happen to have engineering degrees in this area, we know it to be true.

I urge you to look at the motherboard manual memory section and see that the graphic for the memory population shows you what I am saying. I further urge you to look at the manuals for OTHER motherboards as well, to see that they show the same thing.

I cannot tell you that there is a problem with any specific part or component. I can only tell you what USUALLY causes these type issues and it's usually either a bent pin on the CPU or motherboard (Depending on whether it's AMD or Intel since Intel has the pins on the board and AMD has the pins on the CPU), or a motherboard with some other fault, or bad memory, or memory that is not a matched set, or a CPU cooler that is unevenly tightened around the socket causing the CPU to "cock" in the socket which can cause it to either lose a connection on one of the pins or short to something it is not supposed to be touching.

In some cases, a bad BIOS image or faulty BIOS version could cause some similar issues. Aside from that, I'm not sure there is much else that can cause this and in every case I've seen where the memory would not work correctly when populated in the way it is supposed to be, it was one of those things.

Here are some similar examples.


https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/single-channel-and-dual-channel-ram-problem.3483682/#post-21058497


https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/corsair-vengeance-lpx-3200mhz-w-ryzen-3600-asus-b450-prime-plus.3522335/#post-21281647


As indicated by one of our resident memory engineers, in Post #5 here:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/why-are-we-putting-ram-sticks-into-2nd-and-4th-slot-first.3195865/post-19720591


I would FIRST try putting the memory in slots 2 and 4. Then double check that there are no bent pins. Make sure the CPU cooler is tightened EVENLY all the way around with no one spot tighter than another. Do not tighten any one fastener all the way in one step. Tighten in increments going around the socket until all fasteners are "snug" but not "clamped down" overly tight. Make sure you have the latest BIOS version before any of that.

Then, this.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS