[SOLVED] New Graphics Card, CPU Overclocking and Need for Additional CPU Cooling?

Mar 24, 2019
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Hey,

So my system has been a bit overdue for a hardware upgrade, and after researching different gpus on the market, I set myself on replacing my current GTX 650 ti with the GTX 1660 ti (quite the performance boost, ik). However, with my processor being an intel core i5-2500k, I was beginning to think about ways to overclock my cpu to help make up for possible bottlenecking issues between the cpu and new graphics card, especially in regards to playing a game like The Witcher 3. Right now, I can play the game relatively smoothly on Med settings, but my goal is to get the game to play on high settings with 60+ fps no problem. So my question is, how much overclocking (if any, whether it has to be manual or not) would I need to do, and if it is required for when playing W3, then would I need to get an aftermarket cpu cooler to help cool it while overclocking, or would I be fine to push it just a little bit while still keeping the existing stock cooler?

Thanks
 
Mar 24, 2019
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In reality no matter how much you overclock, to get to those frames, you're looking at a new platform.
You mean new platform of cpus? Or an entirely new pc? Bc either way I disagree strongly. I've already seen countless vidoes of the 1660ti playing W3 on that frame rate with my kind of build no problem. And like King_V said, games like Witcher 3 are more gpu intensive than cpu, which would make up for any performance rifts between the two to some degree.

Also, if you're curious, here is the specs (mostly) of my pc:

Motherboard
ASUS P8Z77-V LX LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

https://www.amazon.com/ASUS-P8Z77-V-LX-Intel-Motherboard/dp/B007MKGF82

CPU
Intel Core i5-2500k Quadcore processor

https://www.amazon.com/INTEL-Core-i5-2500K-Processor-BX80623i52500K/dp/B004FA8NX2/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_3?hvadid=177308009445&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9052045&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=5922163530290810061&hvtargid=aud-647006051489:kwd-29913063083&keywords=intel+core+i5-2500k+processor&qid=1553465110&s=gateway&sr=8-3-fkmrnull

Graphics Card
MSI Geforce GTX 650 ti

https://www.amazon.com/MSI-GeForce-Graphics-N650Ti-1GD5-OC/dp/B009WIW87E

Power Supply Unit (PSU)
Corsair CX750M (750 Watts)

https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Bronze-Certified-Modular-CP-9020061-NA/dp/B00ALK3KEM/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?hvadid=177319818126&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9052045&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=4602500332941362171&hvtargid=aud-647006051489:kwd-55947916075&keywords=corsair+cx750m&qid=1553465175&s=gateway&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

RAM
CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B

PC Case (Tower)
NZXT Guardian 921RB 921RB-001-BL Blue LED SECC Steel / ABS Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146070
-Case Dimensions (H x W x D): 18.07” x 8.11” x 20.55 in
 
Mar 24, 2019
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What have your results been so far with the 1660Ti? I thought that turning up the details only put load on the video card, not the CPU.
I still haven't actually gotten the 1660 ti, but from what I've been hearing from others, (especially for games like W3) you are right about resolution having more of an effect on GPU rather than CPU. It's bc of that fact that I'm hoping I may not need to even manually overclock at all, maybe choose choose a slightly higher GHz usage for my cpu with its stock boosting technology as it is.
 
I think maybe it's best thus far not to worry about it until you actually get the 1660Ti and try it out.

If anything seems funny, jittery, etc., you can then run monitoring software (I think a lot of people here use HWInfo), to plot CPU, GPU, RAM, etc utilization over time.

Brief spikes would be fine, but if any particular part spends a lot of time at 100% utilization, then that is your weak point for that game. Other games will likely behave differently.

For the time being, don't even worry about the need to overclock. Cross that bridge when/if you get to it.
 
Mar 24, 2019
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I think maybe it's best thus far not to worry about it until you actually get the 1660Ti and try it out.

If anything seems funny, jittery, etc., you can then run monitoring software (I think a lot of people here use HWInfo), to plot CPU, GPU, RAM, etc utilization over time.

Brief spikes would be fine, but if any particular part spends a lot of time at 100% utilization, then that is your weak point for that game. Other games will likely behave differently.

For the time being, don't even worry about the need to overclock. Cross that bridge when/if you get to it.
That sounds smart; I only started to think about cpu overclocking bc of the things I was hearing from others about my current cpu not matching up to the 1660ti, but I'll just find out for myself once it's actually setup and all ready to go. As for that HWInfo software you mentioned earlier for monitoring CPU, RAM etc. usage, is that the same one as what I see in a lot of those testing hardware videos on YT where they have a game running and there is an interface running over the game showing all the different usages of the pc hardware? If so, I'll make sure to get that now so I can use it in games when I get the GPU upgrade.
 
The thing is that so-called "mismatches" between a CPU and GPU are really thinking about this the wrong way.... unless it's something blatant like an old Dual Core Intel with a modern mid-to-high-end GPU.

Mostly, it's a matter of the game being the "mismatch" to the CPU or GPU (requiring way more CPU or GPU than you have), or the monitor (too high a resolution and/or refresh rate for a GPU), or someone getting a high-end GPU while having a monitor that's only 1920x1080 @ max 60Hz refresh.

I can't say much about HWInfo - other than seeing it mentioned in these forums, as I generally don't watch YouTube videos to get performance information. In a weird twist of irony, I've never actually used HWInfo, but it seems to be highly regarded.
 
Mar 24, 2019
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The thing is that so-called "mismatches" between a CPU and GPU are really thinking about this the wrong way.... unless it's something blatant like an old Dual Core Intel with a modern mid-to-high-end GPU.

Mostly, it's a matter of the game being the "mismatch" to the CPU or GPU (requiring way more CPU or GPU than you have), or the monitor (too high a resolution and/or refresh rate for a GPU), or someone getting a high-end GPU while having a monitor that's only 1920x1080 @ max 60Hz refresh.

I can't say much about HWInfo - other than seeing it mentioned in these forums, as I generally don't watch YouTube videos to get performance information. In a weird twist of irony, I've never actually used HWInfo, but it seems to be highly regarded.
Thanks a bunch for the advice; you've been a big help for my plans with all of this. :D
 
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