Question New-ish 18-Core Xeon Build is slow....anyone have some advice?

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13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
That doesn't look too bad. Your single core, if you press click to compare, is on a par with a mobile part from a newer generation. Which given your clock speeds is about right. Your multicore is a little slower than a similar processor.

In my opinion this rules out hardware. So you are looking at a software problem. I doubt its a perception problem as the mobile part would be snappy enough.

Screen shot of what's running in taskmaster? And the startup sequence?
 

wirefire

Distinguished
Oct 1, 2006
10
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18,510
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This should not be particularly relevant but why are you using a Xeon CPU in an X99 motherboard with non-ECC ram? It may be "supported" but even ASUS lists that the X99 chipset in conjunction with a Xeon class CPU may lead to some features being "unsupported" The spectre mitigations can screw with how the CPU performs under multithreaded loads too. You could try disabling Hyperthreading (just to see if it has any impact). but really if you feel there is a loss of response... try disconnecting all of your mechanical hard drives and just boot the system with the SSD ( I am assuming the NVMe is the boot disk) and see if one of the mechanical drives / raid controller is overloading the IO bus with retries or some other nonsense.
 
Aug 14, 2019
23
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10
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This should not be particularly relevant but why are you using a Xeon CPU in an X99 motherboard with non-ECC ram? It may be "supported" but even ASUS lists that the X99 chipset in conjunction with a Xeon class CPU may lead to some features being "unsupported" The spectre mitigations can screw with how the CPU performs under multithreaded loads too. You could try disabling Hyperthreading (just to see if it has any impact). but really if you feel there is a loss of response... try disconnecting all of your mechanical hard drives and just boot the system with the SSD ( I am assuming the NVMe is the boot disk) and see if one of the mechanical drives / raid controller is overloading the IO bus with retries or some other nonsense.
I likely did the xeon because some twit said it would be great for video compiling and such and I looked for a board that was "compatible."

I have the feeling that a 6 core I7 would have been a better choice.
 

13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
It depends on parallelism of your software, 18 slow cores would beat 6 faster cores if you can use all 18 cores... I think the very high core counts are more for virtualisation servers.

You might just want to try a windows resintall on a spare disk to see if it behaves similarly, before you beat yourself up too hard.
 
Aug 14, 2019
23
0
10
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It depends on parallelism of your software, 18 slow cores would beat 6 faster cores if you can use all 18 cores... I think the very high core counts are more for virtualisation servers.

You might just want to try a windows resintall on a spare disk to see if it behaves similarly, before you beat yourself up too hard.
Hahah! Agreed...tried the reinstall route already. It's not unbearably slow, it's just noticeably slower on running things and booting than my 3+year old gaming pc which is by no means super specced out.
 

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