[SOLVED] New router, higher ping??

thewalleprod

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I just switched from a Nighthawk A1750 to an Asus RT-AX3000 router. On the Nighthawk I was getting 25-30 ping when gaming. After I installed the ASUS router, I see that my ping is now 40-45 when gaming.
Any reason why this would be? I have a brand new modem from my ISP. The nighthawk was giving me WiFi issues, so I had to switch.

Anything helps.

Thanks
 
Not real likely. Again the extra delays should be in the first couple hops. Anything past that is in other ISP. No matter what you change in your house it will have no impact on routers in another ISP. If it did think what the hackers could do.

You have to think of each router in the path as a truck stop. Your data gets unloaded from one truck and loaded into another and that is then sent on the path. Since these trucks are not yours you have no control of the path they take.

I just can't see how this can happen. What you actually do when you send out a tracert command is send data to the end node but you set a value the limits the number of router hops the data is allowed to cross. You start with 1 and increase it. Each router reduces this by 1 and if it get back to zero it sends back a message. That is how you actually get the ip of the routers in the path.

I can't possibly see how your router can affect that process.
 

popatim

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I would start by disabling/withdrawing from AiProtection and seeing if the issue is actually something in that suite.

on the other hand, its 10 milliseconds; that's only 1/100ths of a second. Is it really worth looking for?
 

thewalleprod

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I would start by disabling/withdrawing from AiProtection and seeing if the issue is actually something in that suite.

on the other hand, its 10 milliseconds; that's only 1/100ths of a second. Is it really worth looking for?
Well I'm just wondering why it would go from 25-30 to 40-45 when switching to a different router. I just want to find what setting is in this router that is causing this.
 

USAFRet

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I just switched from a Nighthawk A1750 to an Asus RT-AX3000 router. On the Nighthawk I was getting 25-30 ping when gaming. After I installed the ASUS router, I see that my ping is now 40-45 when gaming.
Any reason why this would be? I have a brand new modem from my ISP. The nighthawk was giving me WiFi issues, so I had to switch.

Anything helps.

Thanks
The only "ping" that matters and you can influence is between your PC and your router.
 
You need to check the ping times between your pc and the router not in some game. Since you do not have data from before you will likely not be able to compare but in general you should see less than 10ms of ping time on wifi. Your problem is likely spikes causing the stutter.

All I can think of is your new router is using different radio channels than the old one was.

It also may depend on what you end device supports. The new router is wifi6. If the nic card supports that that is a major difference in the way the data is transmitted. In theory it should be better. If your end device is 802.11ac then the router could actually be slower. It only has 2 antenna so it only support 2x2 mimo where you old router supports 3x3. Not sure if that really matters for ping times more for bandwidth.

In any case a consistent 10ms extra should not hurt you. You need to do some careful testing to the router IP in your house to see if it is the wifi.

You could also plug a ethernet cable into the router and ping some ip like 8.8.8.8 and then plug directly in the modem and compare. In general a router adds less than 1ms of delay. If the numbers are very close it could be that something change in the path to your game about the same time you changed the router and you just noticed it.
 

thewalleprod

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You need to check the ping times between your pc and the router not in some game. Since you do not have data from before you will likely not be able to compare but in general you should see less than 10ms of ping time on wifi. Your problem is likely spikes causing the stutter.

All I can think of is your new router is using different radio channels than the old one was.

It also may depend on what you end device supports. The new router is wifi6. If the nic card supports that that is a major difference in the way the data is transmitted. In theory it should be better. If your end device is 802.11ac then the router could actually be slower. It only has 2 antenna so it only support 2x2 mimo where you old router supports 3x3. Not sure if that really matters for ping times more for bandwidth.

In any case a consistent 10ms extra should not hurt you. You need to do some careful testing to the router IP in your house to see if it is the wifi.

You could also plug a ethernet cable into the router and ping some ip like 8.8.8.8 and then plug directly in the modem and compare. In general a router adds less than 1ms of delay. If the numbers are very close it could be that something change in the path to your game about the same time you changed the router and you just noticed it.
Thank you for your response, Bill.

I still have the old router and plugged it in to see if there were any differences, and sure enough on the Netgear Nighthawk I am back to 25-30 ping in games and also do not have any stutters or lag when playing. Not sure if I should plug in the new router and try full cone NAT as it is on Symmetric atm.
 
That is a strange option, but it depends what they really mean. If I remember correctly it was something like a form of DMZ, but I am too lazy to search for it. I doubt it will have any effect

What I would do is run tracert a bunch of times and try to find where the difference it. Since you consistently get higher latency the tracert should show it, with random spikes it will many times not show the problem because it does not run long enough.

You are either going to see differences in the first hop with is going to be related to the wifi or your will see a increase in the second hop which many times is your ISP but it also includes the router. It is very rare for a router to add more than say 1ms so if you see difference in hop 2 but not in hop 1 then it could be some issue with the router firmware.
 

thewalleprod

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That is a strange option, but it depends what they really mean. If I remember correctly it was something like a form of DMZ, but I am too lazy to search for it. I doubt it will have any effect

What I would do is run tracert a bunch of times and try to find where the difference it. Since you consistently get higher latency the tracert should show it, with random spikes it will many times not show the problem because it does not run long enough.

You are either going to see differences in the first hop with is going to be related to the wifi or your will see a increase in the second hop which many times is your ISP but it also includes the router. It is very rare for a router to add more than say 1ms so if you see difference in hop 2 but not in hop 1 then it could be some issue with the router firmware.
Tracert shows nothing. It just shows an average of 40-45ms.. The problem is, is when online gaming, I am seeing severe stutters every 5-10 seconds even if i am ALT-tabbed out and I know this is due to the connection because when I went back to my old router, I did not see this issue anymore.
 
That doesn't make much sense. So you are saying the hops say 1-9 are the same but then the hop 10 is higher on one router than the other.

Not sure how that can ever happen. Your routers only option is to send and receive data from the ISP router. It has no idea how the data is handed off after that....why would it when it only has 1 option. The connections between routers on the internet although it can change from time to time it tends to be very consistent and the latency between 2 ISP routers can not actually be affected by anything you do.

All I can think of is the router somehow is contaminating the test results.

If you have not tried newer firmware I would try that. If you are on the latest firmware try the merlin firmware. This is indirectly supported by asus, I tend to like the merlin firmware better anyway. It is extremely stable mostly because it has far few feature than third party firmware like dd-wrt.
 

thewalleprod

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That doesn't make much sense. So you are saying the hops say 1-9 are the same but then the hop 10 is higher on one router than the other.

Not sure how that can ever happen. Your routers only option is to send and receive data from the ISP router. It has no idea how the data is handed off after that....why would it when it only has 1 option. The connections between routers on the internet although it can change from time to time it tends to be very consistent and the latency between 2 ISP routers can not actually be affected by anything you do.

All I can think of is the router somehow is contaminating the test results.

If you have not tried newer firmware I would try that. If you are on the latest firmware try the merlin firmware. This is indirectly supported by asus, I tend to like the merlin firmware better anyway. It is extremely stable mostly because it has far few feature than third party firmware like dd-wrt.
Yes, this is why i am so confused.. Only on the Nighthawk AC1750 am I getting low ping (25-30ms) and no issues while online gaming. I returned the ASUS AX3000 and got a Netgear AC1900 Modem/router combo to see if it would make a difference, and it did not. I was on 40-45ms ping and severe stuttering while online gaming. I have run out of options at this point lol.
 

thewalleprod

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Feb 28, 2016
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That doesn't make much sense. So you are saying the hops say 1-9 are the same but then the hop 10 is higher on one router than the other.

Not sure how that can ever happen. Your routers only option is to send and receive data from the ISP router. It has no idea how the data is handed off after that....why would it when it only has 1 option. The connections between routers on the internet although it can change from time to time it tends to be very consistent and the latency between 2 ISP routers can not actually be affected by anything you do.

All I can think of is the router somehow is contaminating the test results.

If you have not tried newer firmware I would try that. If you are on the latest firmware try the merlin firmware. This is indirectly supported by asus, I tend to like the merlin firmware better anyway. It is extremely stable mostly because it has far few feature than third party firmware like dd-wrt.
What I did realize though, is that when plugged into the new router/modem, I have a different public IP than when I plugged it into the Nighthawk AC1750... Could this be the reasoning?
 
Not real likely. Again the extra delays should be in the first couple hops. Anything past that is in other ISP. No matter what you change in your house it will have no impact on routers in another ISP. If it did think what the hackers could do.

You have to think of each router in the path as a truck stop. Your data gets unloaded from one truck and loaded into another and that is then sent on the path. Since these trucks are not yours you have no control of the path they take.

I just can't see how this can happen. What you actually do when you send out a tracert command is send data to the end node but you set a value the limits the number of router hops the data is allowed to cross. You start with 1 and increase it. Each router reduces this by 1 and if it get back to zero it sends back a message. That is how you actually get the ip of the routers in the path.

I can't possibly see how your router can affect that process.
 

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