Page file being used with free memory

suprcharg

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I can't figure out why the ctrl+alt+del performance monitor is showing me using 150-350 megs of my page file when I have 400+ megs of ram free?
anyone got that one?
Thanks
James
 

sturm

Splendid
Windows will always use the pagefile if its available. Besides you want as much free memory as you can get. Windows will put stuff thats not being used in the pagefile giving youmore memory for your programs.
 

suprcharg

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With having only 1 gig of memory I suppose that's ok, but I just ordered 2 gigs for my new build. I wouldn't want my swap file being used at all. (at least in XP)
Thx for the reply.
 
It's better to have a pagefile than not to have one. Disabling it with 2+ GBs of RAM won't give you any noticable increase in performance... and depending on the programs you're running, you may start experiencing out of memory errors.
 

Nilpo

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Disabling the page file is an all around bad idea. The NT kernel was designed to run from a page file. Period.
 

Nilpo

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Last two posts = not true for Windows XP.

http://www.tweakxp.com/article37016.aspx

Explains how to set up XP to stop paging information to the hard drive. Very simple trick, and it does give a noticeable boost (even if it is only a slightly noticeable boost).
I have to completely disagree with you. Yes, it is easy to disable it, but that doesn't make it smart. It's also easy to disable AV software, but I wouldn't recommend that either.
 

Boristhetech

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Are you disagreeing because I'm challenging your knowledge, or because you have a technical reason? If you care to give me more than "I disagree" then please, do so. Thus far you haven't proven your point. I've been using this particular tweak for 2 years now and have yet to have a single problem with it. "The NT Kernel was designed to run from a page file" is your only technical information. The NT kernel was designed almost 10 years ago. Do you not think that there have been some advancements in that time period? Previous versions of Windows have required page files because RAM used to be expensive and very limited. RAM limitations are nowhere NEAR what they used to be now, and I do believe that Microsoft has made adjustments to the Kernel that allow it to operate perfectly without a page file.
 
From XP Myths:

Myth - "Disabling the Paging File improves performance."

Reality - "You gain no performance improvement by turning off the Paging File. When certain applications start, they allocate a huge amount of memory (hundreds of megabytes typically set aside in virtual memory) even though they might not use it. If no paging file (pagefile.sys) is present, a memory-hogging application can quickly use a large chunk of RAM. Even worse, just a few such programs can bring a machine loaded with memory to a halt. Some applications (e.g., Adobe Photoshop) will display warnings on startup if no paging file is present."

"In modern operating systems, including Windows, application programs and many system processes always reference memory using virtual memory addresses which are automatically translated to real (RAM) addresses by the hardware. Only core parts of the operating system kernel bypass this address translation and use real memory addresses directly. All processes (e.g. application executables) running under 32 bit Windows gets virtual memory addresses (a Virtual Address Space) going from 0 to 4,294,967,295 (2*32-1 = 4 GB), no matter how much RAM is actually installed on the computer. In the default Windows OS configuration, 2 GB of this virtual address space are designated for each process' private use and the other 2 GB are shared between all processes and the operating system. RAM is a limited resource, whereas virtual memory is, for most practical purposes, unlimited. There can be a large number of processes each with its own 2 GB of private virtual address space. When the memory in use by all the existing processes exceeds the amount of RAM available, the operating system will move pages (4 KB pieces) of one or more virtual address spaces to the computer's hard disk, thus freeing that RAM frame for other uses. In Windows systems, these "paged out" pages are stored in one or more files called pagefile.sys in the root of a partition. Virtual Memory is always in use, even when the memory required by all running processes does not exceed the amount of RAM installed on the system."

Some programs REQUIRE a pagefile... and will give you a warning if one isn't present. If you want to increase performance, install another physical hard drive and move the pagefile to that drive. Any other pagefile "tweak" is NOT effective in increasing performance.
 

Nilpo

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Thank you, Zoron.....and boris, you are correct....I will post back with some links for you to read...let me put them together.