Question Pc crashed and won’t boot

Jun 23, 2019
4
0
10
0
Hello, just a quick question my pc crashed during a game of overwatch and now when I click the power button all the RGB and Fans start spining for 1-2 seconds then there’s a loud click and the pc crashes. I narrowed it down to the power supply or cpu.
Things I have tried-
  1. Resetting the cmos (Didn’t work)
  2. Moving the ram into different slots (didn’twork)
  3. 3.reseating the mobo,cpu,GPU Power connectors (didn’t work)
4. looked for stray screws lose wires that could have caused the crash (found nothing)

This has happened before, just a random crash during gaming or high intensity programs but it work normally work after the crash this time it’s not booting. I have no spare psu to test it and I don’t want to go buy a new one to just find out that it’s not the problem. I would love if anyone could ensure me that it’s the psu so I can go out and buy a new one :)
Pc specs
Cpu: Ryzen 7 2700x
Cpu cooler: deepcool captain 240ex liquid cooler
Mobo: msi b450 mortar titanium
Ram: G Skill - Trident Z 16gb 2x8 3200
Storage: Samsung 970evo 500gb m.2 drive
GPU: asus Radeon Vega 64
PSU: Gigabyte - 750w 80+ gold semi modular ATX

Sorry about the bad writing/ formatting I’m writing this on my phone :/

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Duplicate text/paragraphs removed by Moderator
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
Question: is this PC prebuilt PC or did you pick the components out by yourself and assembled your PC by yourself? If it's the latter, i'd really like to know why you went with that Gigabyte PSU.

As far as what's wrong with your PC goes, what you're currently looking at, at bare minimum, is dead PSU and MoBo. At worst case scenario, everything that was connected to that low quality PSU is also fried.

Next step would be buying a new, good quality PSU. Since your Vega 64 is 295W GPU, i'd be comfortable using any Seasonic unit in 800W range, e.g: Focus+ 850 (80+ Gold), Focus+ 850 (80+ Platinum), PRIME AirTouch 850 (80+ Gold) or PRIME Ultra 850 (80+ Titanium),
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/jWFXsY,P638TW,nyQG3C,6Qx2FT/

Warranty wise:
Focus+: 10 years
PRIME: 12 years (includes all PRIME models: regular, Fanless, AirTouch, SnowSilent, Ultra)

All my 3 PCs: Skylake, Haswell and AMD are also powered by Seasonic. Full specs with pics in my sig.

However, there is very high chance that your MoBo is also dead and new PSU doesn't fix that. Only MoBo replacement fixes dead MoBo.
So, i'd 1st get new PSU and if you still can't POST, i'd be getting new MoBo as well. It is also possible that your GPU, RAM, CPU etc got fried as well. Without 2nd PC to test the components out, it's impossible to tell what survived and what didn't.
Here, either use the process of elimination, or if you don't want to do that by yourself, bring your PC to any PC repair shop. Techs there can check your PC and replace dead components but it will cost you more compared to when you do it yourself.
 
Jun 23, 2019
4
0
10
0
Question: is this PC prebuilt PC or did you pick the components out by yourself and assembled your PC by yourself? If it's the latter, i'd really like to know why you went with that Gigabyte PSU.

As far as what's wrong with your PC goes, what you're currently looking at, at bare minimum, is dead PSU and MoBo. At worst case scenario, everything that was connected to that low quality PSU is also fried.

Next step would be buying a new, good quality PSU. Since your Vega 64 is 295W GPU, i'd be comfortable using any Seasonic unit in 800W range, e.g: Focus+ 850 (80+ Gold), Focus+ 850 (80+ Platinum), PRIME AirTouch 850 (80+ Gold) or PRIME Ultra 850 (80+ Titanium),
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/jWFXsY,P638TW,nyQG3C,6Qx2FT/

Warranty wise:
Focus+: 10 years
PRIME: 12 years (includes all PRIME models: regular, Fanless, AirTouch, SnowSilent, Ultra)

All my 3 PCs: Skylake, Haswell and AMD are also powered by Seasonic. Full specs with pics in my sig.

However, there is very high chance that your MoBo is also dead and new PSU doesn't fix that. Only MoBo replacement fixes dead MoBo.
So, i'd 1st get new PSU and if you still can't POST, i'd be getting new MoBo as well. It is also possible that your GPU, RAM, CPU etc got fried as well. Without 2nd PC to test the components out, it's impossible to tell what survived and what didn't.
Here, either use the process of elimination, or if you don't want to do that by yourself, bring your PC to any PC repair shop. Techs there can check your PC and replace dead components but it will cost you more compared to when you do it yourself.
I Fixed THIS problem, I reseated the cpu again and for some reason the pc decided to stay on this time fans spinning rgb on etc. but now I’m stuck because the pc won’t display anything to my monitor and the cpu debug light on my motherboard is shining.
I also put my cpu and gpu into my brothers Ryzen build and they worked fine so cpu+GPU have not been fried I can’t say the same for the motherboard. At this time I believe the mobo is the reason for my problems but not sure. Any help is appreciated thanks in advance :) and yes I did build this pc.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
Care to also explain your reasoning behind selecting that Gigabyte PSU?

You had plenty of signs showing that your PSU can't handle powering your PC during heavy load since when your PC reboots during heavy load (e.g gaming), it's the PSU's fault who can't deliver either enough wattage or stable enough voltage for your PC.
Since you disregarded those signs, PSU eventually blew up, taking at least MoBo with it.

Life lesson: do not buy cheap PSUs. If you don't know which PSU to buy, come here to Tom's Hardware forums and ask it. We have plenty of PSU experts here who can say which PSUs are safe to use and which ones to avoid.

Like i said above, next step would be new PSU and after that, new MoBo as well.
 
Jun 23, 2019
4
0
10
0
Care to also explain your reasoning behind selecting that Gigabyte PSU?

You had plenty of signs showing that your PSU can't handle powering your PC during heavy load since when your PC reboots during heavy load (e.g gaming), it's the PSU's fault who can't deliver either enough wattage or stable enough voltage for your PC.
Since you disregarded those signs, PSU eventually blew up, taking at least MoBo with it.

Life lesson: do not buy cheap PSUs. If you don't know which PSU to buy, come here to Tom's Hardware forums and ask it. We have plenty of PSU experts here who can say which PSUs are safe to use and which ones to avoid.

Like i said above, next step would be new PSU and after that, new MoBo as well.
Well firstly it wasnt cheap lol it was average price about the same maybe 25$ more expensive then my bros psu who has the same nearly the same build as me.
Secondly it passed all my tests
  1. Its a named brand (Gigabyte is a named brand is it not?)
  2. It had enough watts for my build, I watched multiple YouTube videos explaining that 750watts was enough for most builds and if you weren’t sure just hop on over to pc part picker and look at the recommended wattage and +100 (which is what my bro did he got a 650 watt psu powering Basically the exact same pc as me and he hasn’t crashed yet) so saying that 750 wasn’t enough to power my pc i refuse to believe that.
  3. It was semi modular
Those are the reasons I picked this psu I think I chose correctly maybe not but at the time (about 6 month ago) when I built my the pc it looked like the logical choice.
Sorry again for bad spelling and formatting I’m typing this on my phone during work so I kinda rushed it :/
Edit: also my PC has only crashed maybe 1-3 times in the past 6 months so I’m not sure if the psu really was the cause but :/ We are yet to see
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
Yes, Gigabyte is known brand if you want to buy their MoBo, GPU, PC case, mice etc but they don't do well with PSUs. Same with MSI. MSI MoBos, GPUs, monitors etc are one of the best out there but when MSI tried their luck in PSU market, they failed miserably.

Also, when it comes to the PSUs, you can go wrong even with known PSU brands. For example: Corsair VS, CX series or EVGA non-Supernova series, e.g 500B. Despite those PSUs having known brand name slapped on them, e.g Corsair VS650, doesn't instantly mean the PSU is of good quality.

Same with wattage, just because PSU label shows it having more than enough wattage (e.g 750W), in reality, the 750W may be peak wattage and not continuous wattage. I've seen several low quality PSUs where the label reads e.g 500W but during testing, PSU blows when the load on it is around 375W. That "500W" unit is effectively only 350W unit.
Here, i also think that your Gigabyte unit has it's wattage marketed higher than the PSU can actually deliver. Either that, or PSU +12V rails operate out of ATX PSU standard specs.

According to the ATX PSU standard, safe voltage ranges are:
+12V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +11.40V to +12.60V
+5V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V
+3.3V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +3.14V to +3.47V
-12V DC rail - tolerance ±10% ; -10.80V to -13.20V
+5V SB rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V

Anything lower or higher than that aren't safe for PC components. Lower voltage can cause data corruption while higher voltage can fry components.

Lastly, PSU modularity plays 0 role in how good build quality PSU is. Best example here would be Seasonic S12II series which is fully wired. Despite the S12II series being 8 years old, it's the best group-regulated PSU ever made and Seasonic still produces the S12II series. My AMD build was also powered by Seasonic S12II-520 PSU for years before i bought Seasonic Focus+ 550 (80+ Platinum) for it.

In the end, if you want to know how good/bad the PSU is, you need to read reputable reviews. E.g Tom's Hardware, JonnyGuru, AnandTech, Hardware Secrets, PC Perspective, [H]ardOCP, KitGuru are some of the reputable reviewers. While there are a lot of review sites there, including youtube video reviews, many of them only show unboxing and/or overview, without any real testing.

Since there are so many PSUs out there and if you can't find a reputable review of said unit, chances are the PSU is best to be avoided. For example, the single review i found of your Gigabyte G750H unit is from Russian review site;
link: https://i2hard.ru/publications/21996/

After reading that review, i can say that it's biased review. For example, the reviewer claims the Gigabyte PSU to have "all" the protections (OVP, UVP, OPP, SCP) while in fact, it doesn't have OCP (Over Current Protection) and OTP (Over Temperature Protection).
The Seasonic units i suggested above do have all 6x protections in them. Also, PRIME Ultra 850 (80+ Titanium) is the best 850W PSU money can buy at current date,
review 01: http://www.jonnyguru.com/blog/2018/05/21/seasonic-prime-ultra-850-titanium-power-supply/
review 02: https://pcper.com/2017/12/seasonic-prime-ultra-850w-titanium-power-supply/

In the end, different persons have different standards (some have higher standards while others have lower standards) and it's up to every person to decide how good of a build quality components are safe to use in their PC. But keep in mind that PSU is the most important component inside the PC since it powers everything.
 
Jun 23, 2019
4
0
10
0
Yes, Gigabyte is known brand if you want to buy their MoBo, GPU, PC case, mice etc but they don't do well with PSUs. Same with MSI. MSI MoBos, GPUs, monitors etc are one of the best out there but when MSI tried their luck in PSU market, they failed miserably.

Also, when it comes to the PSUs, you can go wrong even with known PSU brands. For example: Corsair VS, CX series or EVGA non-Supernova series, e.g 500B. Despite those PSUs having known brand name slapped on them, e.g Corsair VS650, doesn't instantly mean the PSU is of good quality.

Same with wattage, just because PSU label shows it having more than enough wattage (e.g 750W), in reality, the 750W may be peak wattage and not continuous wattage. I've seen several low quality PSUs where the label reads e.g 500W but during testing, PSU blows when the load on it is around 375W. That "500W" unit is effectively only 350W unit.
Here, i also think that your Gigabyte unit has it's wattage marketed higher than the PSU can actually deliver. Either that, or PSU +12V rails operate out of ATX PSU standard specs.

Lastly, PSU modularity plays 0 role in how good build quality PSU is. Best example here would be Seasonic S12II series which is fully wired. Despite the S12II series being 8 years old, it's the best group-regulated PSU ever made and Seasonic still produces the S12II series. My AMD build was also powered by Seasonic S12II-520 PSU for years before i bought Seasonic Focus+ 550 (80+ Platinum) for it.

In the end, if you want to know how good/bad the PSU is, you need to read reputable reviews. E.g Tom's Hardware, JonnyGuru, AnandTech, Hardware Secrets, PC Perspective, [H]ardOCP, KitGuru are some of the reputable reviewers. While there are a lot of review sites there, including youtube video reviews, many of them only show unboxing and/or overview, without any real testing.

Since there are so many PSUs out there and if you can't find a reputable review of said unit, chances are the PSU is best to be avoided. For example, the single review i found of your Gigabyte G750H unit is from Russian review site;
link: https://i2hard.ru/publications/21996/

After reading that review, i can say that it's biased review. For example, the reviewer claims the Gigabyte PSU to have "all" the protections (OVP, UVP, OPP, SCP) while in fact, it doesn't have OCP (Over Current Protection) and OTP (Over Temperature Protection).
The Seasonic units i suggested above do have all 6x protections in them. Also, PRIME Ultra 850 (80+ Titanium) is the best 850W PSU money can buy at current date,
review 01: http://www.jonnyguru.com/blog/2018/05/21/seasonic-prime-ultra-850-titanium-power-supply/
review 02: https://pcper.com/2017/12/seasonic-prime-ultra-850w-titanium-power-supply/

In the end, different persons have different standards (some have higher standards while others have lower standards) and it's up to every person to decide how good of a build quality components are safe to use in their PC. But keep in mind that PSU is the most important component inside the PC since it powers everything.
Oh ok, that makes a lot more sense. But would you mind helping me with my current problem? The entire pc is being powered and all the fans and lights are working but for some reason I’m not getting any signal? What does this mean? I looked around google,reddit etc and most people find it to be there MoBo or CPU. Mine can’t be the cpu since I tested it in my bros pc so should I look at finding a new MoBo? But then if I go and buy a new MoBo and it turns out it wasn’t the mobo I’ll be even more upset ;( I just want a clear answer for the reasoning of the problem before I go ahead and buy anything. Also if the psu fried my MoBo can’t i claim that under the psu’s warranty or something? I’ve only had the psu for 6ish months and I do remember getting a sheet for warranty and stuff? Any way I’m gonna get some sleep hope to hear from someone when I wake up would be nice :) thanks in advance
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Herald
I've said it twice now and i'll say it again: no display signal, despite PC powering on, points towards either: dead CPU, dead MoBo, dead RAM or dead GPU. Since you've tested your CPU and GPU in the 2nd PC successfully, these two aren't the issue. Leaving RAM and MoBo.

You can test the RAM in 2nd PC as well and if your RAM works in 2nd PC without issues, that leaves only MoBo. Also, MoBo is usually 1st to go when PSU blows up.

While your can RMA your PSU under warranty and get a replacement unit. The PSU warranty does not cover the replacement of any other component PSU fried. Meaning that you still need to buy a new MoBo.

If i'd be in your place, i'd buy new Seasonic PSU and new MoBo as well. While you can get "new" Gigabyte PSU from RMA, the fact is that one Gigabyte PSU fried your MoBo and who's there to say that another same Gigabyte PSU doesn't fry your new MoBo as well? I wouldn't risk the new MoBo with same Gigabyte G750H PSU since MoBos aren't cheap and it's very tedious to replace a MoBo.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS