Question PC desktop for CAD system that can handle 3-d rendering

Mar 3, 2020
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I would like to build a new PC desktop- First time doing so.
Hoping for some advice to see if I off base- System will be used for CAD only with 3-d colored renderings- No gaming will be used for the sytem.
This is what I was thinking- hoping for some feedback-
Not sure if I am missing anything or some of the parts may not work together
thanks
- Intel Core i9-9900K Coffee Lake 8-Core, 16-Thread, 3.6 GHz (5.0 GHz Turbo) LGA 1151 (300 Series) 95W BX80684I99900K Desktop Processor Intel UHD Graphics 630

- GPU- Quaddro P2000 5GB Graphics

- ASUS Prime Z390-A/H10 Motherboard Bundled Intel Optane Memory H10 with Solid State Storage (32GB + 512GB) LGA1151 (Intel 8th and 9th Gen) ATX DDR4 DP HDMI M.2 USB 3.1 Gen2 Gigabit LAN

- CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3600 (PC4 28800) Intel XMP 2.0 Desktop Memory Model CMK32GX4M2D3600C18

-Fractal Design Meshify C Black ATX High-Airflow Compact Dark Tint Tempered Glass Window Mid Tower Computer Case

- Seagate IronWolf Pro ST4000NE001 4TB 7200 RPM 128MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive

- SAMSUNG 860 EVO Series 2.5" 500GB SATA III V-NAND 3-bit MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-76E500B/AM

-Fractal Design Celsius+ S24 Dynamic X2 PWM Black 240mm Silent Performance Slim Radiator AIO CPU Liquid/Water Cooler

- Microsoft Windows 10 Home - Full Retail Version (USB Flash Drive)

- GIGABYTE G32QC 32" 165Hz 1440P Curved Gaming Monitor, 2560 x 1440 VA 1500R Display, 1ms (MPRT) Response Time, 94% DCI-P3, VESA Display HDR400, FreeSync Premium Pro, G-Sync Compatible Ready, 1x Display Port 1.2, 2x HDMI 2.0, 2x USB 3.0
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Are you using the 2020 versions of those programs, or an older version? If you are using an older version, are there plans to upgrade to the newer version at some point? Probably, it could make a difference, as different versions of many of these CAD and 3D programs make significant changes to what best works with them in terms of single or multiple core optimizations and whether CPU or GPU resources are best targeted for performance.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The system requirements for both of those are extremely low for a CAD or 3D modeling application or add on. You could probably get away with a significantly less capable system, although I wouldn't recommend it if you are doing this professionally.

Are you a professional, or in school to become one, or is this more of a hobbyist type usage?
 
Mar 3, 2020
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Okay, but does everything look good with regards to the compatibility of components? What about cooling? Do I need the water-cooled or can fans be enough? I don't need a flashy system as it will be tucked away, more of a professional look
I don't want to overdo it and not utilize everything. No need to over-purchase on the machine if I won't use it
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What is your actual budget for this build? What is the MOST you are willing to spend on it, and then we'll try to stay as far away from that number as possible, IF possible, while still providing plenty of compute power that will serve you for as long a time as possible until the next upgrade becomes inevitable.

And we'll also try to make sure you can do find with air. I'm not a fan of water cooling myself to be honest.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You definitely DON'T want a Quaddro workstation card as there are no Quaddro drivers for Vectorworks, and that's according to their own support personnel. Besides which, gaming cards these days are just as, and in some cases, more capable, and tend to cost less for higher performance cards.

Do you currently have a system you are using that has a valid, activated version of Windows 7, 8.1 or 10 on it, that WON'T be used by you after this system is put into service? Because if you DO, you can likely shave 100 bucks off the cost by reusing that license for the new system, by simply upgrading to Windows 10 on that system now if it is not Windows 10, and then attaching it to a Microsoft account in your name, or just attaching it, if it is already on Windows 10.

Also, I don't see a power supply included in your build contents, so I'm guessing you've overlooked it or you have one already that you think might be suitable for use with the new system in which case I'd ask that it might be good to share the model/brand/series so we can determine that for sure. Being as it's THE most important piece of the puzzle, it's kind of important.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I think this is really about where you want to be, in fact, it might be a little more than you actually strictly NEED, but this should give you many years of reliable, high performance service at a very high level. It's a little more than you outlined for the budget, and I COULD bring the price down a bit, but you'd have to make a few sacrifices and all things considered, hardware is abnormally expensive right now across the board so while 2000 dollars would easily be a realistic budget for this kind of professional machine normally, right now the prices of hardware are out of whack because of the long period of Covid related manufacturing and shipping shut down by China.

We could probably drop the graphics card down to an RTX 2060 Super, and still be in fairly good shape, while reducing the budget by about 150 bucks, and we COULD go with a less expensive case, but the one I selected is an exemplary model with an excellent cooling configuration and high quality construction, as well as being large enough to accommodate a big graphics card and cooler along with a variety of storage installation options. The rest, are high quality, and very suitable for the type of build you are looking to do. This is a very solid configuration.

Also, the inclusion of an M.2 NVME drive for the OS gives you a much faster storage option than the standard SATA SSD you had selected.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($283.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright ARO-M14G 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON MAX WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard ($159.99 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 510 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate IronWolf NAS 6 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card ($609.48 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($158.99 @ B&H)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ Corsair)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($109.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-14 (Black) 68.4 CFM 140 mm Fan ($19.07 @ Amazon)
Monitor: LG 32GK650F-B 32.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor ($346.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2242.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-08-14 22:21 EDT-0400
 
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Reactions: RodroX
Mar 3, 2020
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Okay seems like I am almost there- If you have another recommendation of parts for a good system that will handle 3-d animation of the Enscape rendering software that please recommend. Also, I really want to build my own computer for the first, but would like to be aware of common pitfalls to look out for when assembling and starting up
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That build will handle pretty much any program, application, game or other usage you'd care to test it with. Scientific, graphics, gaming, entertainment, media, architecture, programming, you name it, that system will do it hands down.

As for building, this is probably about the best general instructional build video you will find, and it is in three parts.






 
Reactions: RodroX
Mar 3, 2020
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I think this is really about where you want to be, in fact, it might be a little more than you actually strictly NEED, but this should give you many years of reliable, high performance service at a very high level. It's a little more than you outlined for the budget, and I COULD bring the price down a bit, but you'd have to make a few sacrifices and all things considered, hardware is abnormally expensive right now across the board so while 2000 dollars would easily be a realistic budget for this kind of professional machine normally, right now the prices of hardware are out of whack because of the long period of Covid related manufacturing and shipping shut down by China.

We could probably drop the graphics card down to an RTX 2060 Super, and still be in fairly good shape, while reducing the budget by about 150 bucks, and we COULD go with a less expensive case, but the one I selected is an exemplary model with an excellent cooling configuration and high quality construction, as well as being large enough to accommodate a big graphics card and cooler along with a variety of storage installation options. The rest, are high quality, and very suitable for the type of build you are looking to do. This is a very solid configuration.

Also, the inclusion of an M.2 NVME drive for the OS gives you a much faster storage option than the standard SATA SSD you had selected.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($283.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright ARO-M14G 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON MAX WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard ($159.99 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 510 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($79.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate IronWolf NAS 6 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card ($609.48 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($158.99 @ B&H)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($124.99 @ Corsair)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($109.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-14 (Black) 68.4 CFM 140 mm Fan ($19.07 @ Amazon)
Monitor: LG 32GK650F-B 32.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor ($346.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2242.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-08-14 22:21 EDT-0400

Sorry just saw the above PC part picker above for recommendation- Are you recommend this might be a better option to select from given what I want to accomplish- Lastly I have an external DVD drive, will that work for this and does this monitor have a built-in camera? I feel pretty confident to build my first computer- What if I run into problems? Where can I go for help?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, a better option. Yes, the external DVD drive will work with this, if you still use optical disks. Most people don't anymore. I do, but that's only because I'm an audio and movie enthusiast and I like to have hard copy backups of everything I do plus optical disk backups of all my important stuff, just in case, because you never know.

Mostly, Windows and other stuff is all installed either by download or USB drive these days. But it's good to have an optical drive, blu ray or dvd, anyhow I think.

Monitors don't have built in cameras. Or at least, no monitor worth buying, or that I've used in the last 30 years. Laptops have them, desktop monitors do not or at least, not commonly. Some very cheap displays MIGHT include a camera, as a sort of gimmicky add on to influence the uninitiated, but you wouldn't want one. If you need a camera, buy a separate camera that you can either clip on to the top of the monitor, or part of your desk, or a dedicated stand for it. Same for microphones. If you need one, don't rely on any type of integrated one. Buy a halfway decent standalone model.

If you run into problems, you are already AT the place you would want to go for help, but if you watch those videos I posted, a few times, all the way through, and maybe jump on youtube and watch a few other "build a PC" videos, or "install a motherboard", "install a power supply" and "install a CPU" as well as specific installation videos for the hardware you buy such as whatever CPU cooler you go with, you should have a pretty good idea of what to do. It's really not rocket science and any problem you run into most ASSUREDLY has a video showing how to go about doing it correctly, on Youtube. Here, and Youtube, are where you go for help, in most cases.
 
Mar 3, 2020
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Okay got it ASome last-minute details, I will probably need some type of speakers - What do you recommend? Also you mentioned if I do web meetings, I should probably look at an external plug and play webcam with mic.
Any final item for my set up? Seems there is no price for the Fractal design fans? What about the placement of these products- Is is self-explained- Lastly is there an order of what to install first from the list you provided me- Thanks so much for your help!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the age of Covid 19. The fans are out of stock currently. Don't be surprised to see that happen with ANY of the listed hardware, or any other hardware you might be looking at.

This is what happens when China shuts down manufacturing and stops sending container ships full of hardware for four months straight. Now we are limited to what arrives piecemeal like, and if it's something somewhat popular it will run out fairly quickly and you just have to keep an eye on the listings and pull the trigger on it as soon as you see it is back in stock.

If you don't mind spending another hundred bucks or so, and if having a truly quiet system is something that is important to you, simply replacing the fans that come with the case AND adding another one or two to them, with Noctua or Thermalright (NOT Thermaltake) fans would significantly move the noise levels in the right direction compared to any fans you'll find coming preinstalled in any cases. A thought anyhow. Otherwise, this would be a much better option than the Fractal fan I included, which I only included so that it would match the rest of the fans that come with the case, instead.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07655KF5C?tag=pcpapi-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1

If you watch the videos, the order to install stuff will be self explanatory, but generally you install any fans that need installed into the case first, then install the motherboard, then the CPU, then the memory, then the CPU cooler (Although in SOME cases you might want to install the CPU cooler while the motherboard is still out of the case. I prefer installing it AFTER the motherboard is installed however.), then any storage drives, then the graphics card and finally the power supply. Or something along those lines anyhow.
 
Mar 3, 2020
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Welcome to the age of Covid 19. The fans are out of stock currently. Don't be surprised to see that happen with ANY of the listed hardware, or any other hardware you might be looking at.

This is what happens when China shuts down manufacturing and stops sending container ships full of hardware for four months straight. Now we are limited to what arrives piecemeal like, and if it's something somewhat popular it will run out fairly quickly and you just have to keep an eye on the listings and pull the trigger on it as soon as you see it is back in stock.

If you don't mind spending another hundred bucks or so, and if having a truly quiet system is something that is important to you, simply replacing the fans that come with the case AND adding another one or two to them, with Noctua or Thermalright (NOT Thermaltake) fans would significantly move the noise levels in the right direction compared to any fans you'll find coming preinstalled in any cases. A thought anyhow. Otherwise, this would be a much better option than the Fractal fan I included, which I only included so that it would match the rest of the fans that come with the case, instead.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07655KF5C?tag=pcpapi-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1

If you watch the videos, the order to install stuff will be self explanatory, but generally you install any fans that need installed into the case first, then install the motherboard, then the CPU, then the memory, then the CPU cooler (Although in SOME cases you might want to install the CPU cooler while the motherboard is still out of the case. I prefer installing it AFTER the motherboard is installed however.), then any storage drives, then the graphics card and finally the power supply. Or something along those lines anyhow.
thanks!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, I mean, that's up to you. That case comes with three fans already, but they are not nearly as good as the Noctua I linked to. If you want to swap out all the fans in the case for these highly recommended (They are ALL I run in my main and secondary systems) then get four of them. If you just want to supplement the fans that the case comes with, then get only one. Totally up to you. It will be much quieter with four of those Noctua NF-A14 fans, but that's also another hundred bucks that isn't, strictly speaking, an essential necessity since the case does come with three halfway decent fans out of the box.

I'd say, maybe get one for now, and then replace the other three IF it turns out you are unsatisfied with the noise level of the case fans it comes with. Make the decision based on the result in front of you instead of just my opinion. You might be ok with the stock fans. For me, I have yet to hear a fan that came with a case except maybe one or two of the very large, very slow, 200mm fans that have come with cases like the Enthoo Pro and Cooler Master Storm enforcer, that were quiet enough that I was like "ok, that works". Normally, I'm like "Nope, those gotta go". But I'm also very sensitive to noise levels and particular types of harmonics.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, I can. How much do you want to spend on them? Because, with mouse and keyboard you don't always get what you pay for and you want features that are very specific to what you do or something that is particularly well designed for a variety of general uses.

For me, the Logitech MX Master 3 is by FAR and away the best mouse out there, but it's not terribly cheap either. For keyboards, I like ergonomics, and I've been using a Microsoft Natural 4000 ergonomic keyboard for years and years and years. I can type MUCH faster on it than on regular keyboards, about 25-35 wpm faster, and everything is simply in better reach due to the design. Then again, I don't have particularly long fingers either, so that's helpful.
 
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Keyboard & mouse are not critical( am not a gamer)- Something affordable and the keyboard should have a low profile with a number pad, the mouse doesn't need to be fancy but I would like both the keyboard and mouse to be wireless.
Also on a side question- i the cpu cooler you recommended(Thermalright ) replacing what CPU comes with? Or is there not cpu cooler thus I need this- Thanks again for guidance through this
Lastly, I see when adding all these computer parts into my basket it asks me if I want insurance- Should I have insurance on some of the parts?
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You don't want ANY of the stock CPU coolers, that come with ANY of the more capable CPUs. Unless you have a small four core CPU, the stock cooler shouldn't even be an option you entertain unless you have absolutely no choice in the matter. The noise alone will drive you up the fracking wall. Trust me, you want a decent CPU cooler. Yes, to the uninitiated these aftermarket coolers SEEM to be HUGE, MASSIVE, completely unnecessary cumbersome contraptions, but I assure you, the performance that the cooling capability brings, or even the reduction in noise level and annoying harmonics alone, more than makes them worth the loss of real estate inside the case.

Insurance. I'm sorry, but LOL. No. Everything has a warranty. Usually, a 30-90 day return period from the retailer depending on state laws and then whatever warranty, usually somewhere between one and ten years, depending on the part and the model, from the manufacturer. The shipper themselves has to insure the parts anyhow, and if you get something that is damaged it just goes right back to the shipper. This is one BIG reason for choosing Amazon over most other retailers because generally if you GET the part damaged, they will pay to ship it back and to ship you the new part. Others, hit or miss on that.

Keyboard and mouse.

These might be a good thing to create another thread for, although I'm certainly willing to help you choose them, but getting input from people who use the specific applications IN the same industry that you work in, might be better suited for making recommendations on these items since they'll know exactly what does and does not work well or what is desirable to have in terms of specialized features for these devices in order to maximize productivity and workflow.

I happen to know somebody who uses some of these applications professionally and I'll ask them for some input as well, to pass along to you. For me, I find it hard to imagine there being a better non-gaming mouse than the Logitech MX master 3, which is NOT a gaming mouse.
 

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