Question Possible overheating problem

Aug 3, 2020
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Hi there!

First of all, I have a Core 2 Quad Q6700 processor and an AMD Radeon HD 7700 graphics card and 4GB of RAM mounted on a Gigabyte GA G41MT S2PT v1.1 motherboard.

I usually play BF3 with no major issues (obviously not with high settings) but I've measured the CPU and GPU temperatures both at idle and under load: the GPU reaches 50-55° and the CPU Core 0 51° under load, and a average of 34° and 32° respectively at idle (except for the Core 0, which reaches 36°). All of these have been measured with Speedfan (Core Temp shows higher temps, at least 10° more).

I also tried to stress test both components with Prime95 and Furmark but got scared of how high they were getting (almost the max. temp of 71° in the case of the CPU) and stopped them.

So my question is, are these normal temperatures (taking into account the age of the components) or is there a problem I should take care of?

Thanks in advance.
 

kiss-method

Commendable
Oct 26, 2018
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stress test vs real use is a lot different. Both temps during USE, are very good and nothing to worry about. Stress test is of course high, as you probably know that the q6700 has an operating temperature of 71c. If you go over 71c, all it's going to do at first is lower the CPU performance to try and lower the heat, which is called thermal throttling. Yes, there is a chance of damage in those temps, but it's quite rare. I've ran a q6600 around 80c and it lived for 3 years under that setting, and even now it's just gathering dust somewhere in a closet, still functional. No worries at all.

You really just want to make sure to keep the dust bunnies out and use it as long as you have to, don't worry about it since in your gaming it's not even close to reaching max temps.

Advice, don't sure furmark with old GPUs especially, you can kill it. It's a really heavy stress tester
 
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Aug 3, 2020
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stress test vs real use is a lot different. Both temps during USE, are very good and nothing to worry about. Stress test is of course high, as you probably know that the q6700 has an operating temperature of 71c. If you go over 71c, all it's going to do at first is lower the CPU performance to try and lower the heat, which is called thermal throttling. Yes, there is a chance of damage in those temps, but it's quite rare. I've ran a q6600 around 80c and it lived for 3 years under that setting, and even now it's just gathering dust somewhere in a closet, still functional. No worries at all.

You really just want to make sure to keep the dust bunnies out and use it as long as you have to, don't worry about it since in your gaming it's not even close to reaching max temps.

Advice, don't sure furmark with old GPUs especially, you can kill it. It's a really heavy stress tester

That's reassuring, thanks a whole bunch!

What I don't understand is why CoreTemp and SpeedFan read different temperatures (according to CoreTemp, the CPU Core 0 reached up to 65° while playing), I'm not sure which one's more reliable...

And thanks for the advice, I won't stress test my GPU again, I hope I didn't mess it up though (I ran the furmark test for a really short time anyway as the temps rose so fast I decided to stop it)

btw I'm not sure if it was a coincidence, but right after stressing test the GPU I ran BF3 and it crashed in the loading screen, showing the "GetDevicedRemovedReason DXGI ERROR_DEVICE_HUNG" DirectX error, I rolled back to the previous version of the graphics card driver just in case but the error kept appearing, then after a few hours (I had shut down the computer) I tried again and the error didn't appear anymore...
 
Last edited:

kiss-method

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I don’t mean to scare you. If it persists, then you can come back to the forums to try and figure it out.

the core temps differ depending on the load and utilization of cores.

I think you’re okay for now
 
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I meant the application called CoreTemp, I've noticed it reads temperatures (idle and under load) different than the ones SpeedFan reads (at least 10° C more).

Unfortunately, the DirectX error popped up again, I've updated the graphics card driver to the most recent version available (in this case an optional one) and it has disappeared again! It looks like it's an intermittent error so I'll keep an eye on it and in case it persist I'll make a new question.

Thanks a lot for you help.
 

kiss-method

Commendable
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Sorry, your previous post's first paragraph flew over my head somehow lol

Okay! for the graphics crash, use DDU to uninstall your GPU completely and start from scratch. Install drivers normally after a complete driver wipe.

For the temp differences, I would be more trusting toward CoreTemp. You should download HWinfo64 to confirm the temps
 
Reactions: Cudero

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Cudero,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Cudero and kiss-method,

There are a few points and misconceptions we need to clear up.

As kiss-method has already mentioned, you can confidently place your trust Core Temp and HWiNFO, which are frequently updated and know to be quite accurate. However, SpeedFan has been left to wither on the vine for many years, and has known issues. SpeedFan also has a steep learning curve, so if you haven't learned how to configure it correctly, it can be very misleading.

When referring to temperatures in SpeedFan, you need to be specific and differentiate between "CPU" temperature (rarely accurate) and "Core" temperatures. For certain processor / motherboard combinations, SpeedFan has a 15° offset "bug" where Core temperatures will be either too low or too high, which is no doubt what you're seeing and why you're confused. However, CPU temperature and Core temperatures can all be individually calibrated in the settings ... if you know where to look and how to do it.
... as you probably know that the q6700 has an operating temperature of 71c. If you go over 71c, all it's going to do at first is lower the CPU performance to try and lower the heat, which is called thermal throttling. Yes, there is a chance of damage in those temps, but it's quite rare. I've ran a q6600 around 80c and it lived for 3 years under that settings ...
From 65 nanometer Core 2 processors first launched in the 3rd quarter of 2006 through today's 14 nanometer 10th generation Core i processors, all Intel desktop processors have not just one, but two thermal specifications. The "operating temperature of 71°C" to which you referred is called the "Tcase" thermal specification, while the other is called the "Tjunction" thermal specification.

Both thermal specifications are shown on Intel's "Datasheets" which are very detailed technical documents, but only one specification is shown on Intel's Product Specifications website, which is just for quick reference. The processor's "family" determines which of the two Thermal Specifications is shown on the website. For Core i 7th generation and later processors, the website shows "Tjunction", while for 6th generation and earlier it's "Tcase", which includes Core 2 Quad processors such as the Q6600 and Q6700.

Tcase is a highly misleading specification that's been confusing users since 2006, because Tcase is NOT Core temperature. Tcase is a factory only temperature that's measured on laboratory engineering samples using a "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. The CPUs in our computers do not have this sensor, so users can not monitor IHS temperature. Moreover, since the cooler in a laptop is mounted directly on the silicon Die, there's no IHS, which is why there's no Tcase specification. Therefore, Tcase is irrelevant.

For desktop processors, Intel's intended purpose for providing a Tcase specification is primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions. And just so you know, the Tcase values currently shown on Intel's website for the Q6600 and Q6700 both have mistakes. There were 2 variants of the Q6600; the original 105 Watt B3 stepping revision and the later 95 Watt G0. The Q6700 was launched only as a 95 Watt G0 stepping revision. Regardless, for either variant, their respective Tcase values are still irrelevant and can simply be disregarded.

The other thermal specification, Tjunction, is where you need to focus your attention. In the datasheets, which use proper terminology, Tjunction is instead call "Tj Max" (Temperature Junction Maximum) which is also known as "Throttle" temperature. As with the vast majority of Intel processors, Throttle temperature (Tj Max)for the Q6600 G0 as well as the Q6700 is 100°C, which is your thermal limit. Tj Max is shown in utilities such as Core Temp and HWiNFO.



Although most processors Throttle at 100°C, it's not recommended to run them that hot. The consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders, expert overclockers and Intel Engineers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International Standard for "normal" is 22°C or 72°F.

All of this information is located in a "Sticky" that you should read; it's at the top of the CPUs forum:

Intel Temperature Guide

Once again, welcome aboard Cudero!

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: Cudero
Aug 3, 2020
7
0
10
0
Cudero,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Cudero and kiss-method,

There are a few points and misconceptions we need to clear up.

As kiss-method has already mentioned, you can place your trust Core Temp and HWiNFO, which are frequently updated and know to be quite accurate. However, SpeedFan has been left to wither on the vine for many years, and has known issues. SpeedFan also has a steep learning curve, so if you haven't learned how to configure it correctly, it can be very misleading.

When referring to temperatures in SpeedFan, you need to be specific and differentiate between "CPU" temperature (rarely accurate) and "Core" temperatures. For certain processor / motherboard combinations, SpeedFan has a 15° offset "bug" where Core temperatures will be either too low or too high, which is no doubt what you're seeing and why you're confused. However, CPU temperature and Core temperatures can all be individually calibrated in the settings ... if you know where to look and how to do it.

From 65 nanometer Core 2 processors first launched in the 3rd quarter of 2006 through today's 14 nanometer 10th generation Core i processors, all Intel desktop processors have not just one, but two thermal specifications. The "operating temperature of 71°C" to which you referred is called the "Tcase" thermal specification, while the other is called the "Tjunction" thermal specification.

Both thermal specifications are shown on Intel's "Datasheets" which are very detailed technical documents, but only one specification is shown on Intel's Product Specifications website, which is just for quick reference. The processor's "family" determines which of the two Thermal Specifications is shown on the website. For Core i 7th and later processors, the website shows "Tjunction", while for 6th generation and earlier it's "Tcase", which includes Core 2 Quad processors such as the Q6600 and Q6700.

Tcase is a highly misleading specification that's been confusing users since 2006, because Tcase is NOT Core temperature. Tcase is a factory only temperature that's measured on laboratory engineering samples using a "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. The CPUs in our computers do not have this sensor, so users can not monitor IHS temperature. Moreover, since the cooler in a laptop is mounted directly on the silicon Die, there's no IHS, which is why there's no Tcase specification. Therefore, Tcase is irrelevant.

For desktop processors, Intel's intended purpose for providing a Tcase specification is primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions. And just so you know, the Tcase values currently shown on Intel's website for the Q6600 and Q6700 both have mistakes. There were 2 variants of the Q6600; the original 105 Watt B3 stepping revision and the later 95 Watt G0. The Q6700 was launched only as a 95 Watt G0 stepping revision. Regardless, for either variant, their respective Tcase values are still irrelevant and can simply be disregarded.

The other thermal specification, Tjunction, is where you need to focus your attention. In the datasheets, which use proper terminology, Tjunction is instead call "Tj Max" (Temperature Junction Maximum) which is also known as "Throttle" temperature. As with the vast majority of Intel processors, Throttle temperature (Tj Max)for the Q6600 G0 as well as the Q6700 is 100°C, which is your thermal limit. Tj Max is shown in utilities such as Core Temp and HWiNFO.



The consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders, expert overclockers and Intel engineers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International Standard for "normal" is 22°C or 72°F.

All of this information is located in a "Sticky" that you should read; it's at the top of the CPUs forum:

Intel Temperature Guide

Once again, welcome aboard Cudero!

CT :sol:

Thanks a bunch to you too, CT! That's definitely such valuable information and a really good explanation.

I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to hardware (only some notions) and I learn as the problems come out, so I'll have to digest all this information first, then I'll come back with a reply.

So far, what I think I've understood is my temps are fine as long as they don't go over 80° C, am I right?

Like I've told you, I'll read all of this more carefully and then I might post a couple of screencaps of CoreTemp/HWiINFO so you can get an idea of my real temps (measured with the aforementioned applications instead of with SpeedFan).

Thanks again!
 

kiss-method

Commendable
Oct 26, 2018
401
19
1,365
104
Cudero,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Cudero and kiss-method,

There are a few points and misconceptions we need to clear up.

As kiss-method has already mentioned, you can confidently place your trust Core Temp and HWiNFO, which are frequently updated and know to be quite accurate. However, SpeedFan has been left to wither on the vine for many years, and has known issues. SpeedFan also has a steep learning curve, so if you haven't learned how to configure it correctly, it can be very misleading.

When referring to temperatures in SpeedFan, you need to be specific and differentiate between "CPU" temperature (rarely accurate) and "Core" temperatures. For certain processor / motherboard combinations, SpeedFan has a 15° offset "bug" where Core temperatures will be either too low or too high, which is no doubt what you're seeing and why you're confused. However, CPU temperature and Core temperatures can all be individually calibrated in the settings ... if you know where to look and how to do it.

From 65 nanometer Core 2 processors first launched in the 3rd quarter of 2006 through today's 14 nanometer 10th generation Core i processors, all Intel desktop processors have not just one, but two thermal specifications. The "operating temperature of 71°C" to which you referred is called the "Tcase" thermal specification, while the other is called the "Tjunction" thermal specification.

Both thermal specifications are shown on Intel's "Datasheets" which are very detailed technical documents, but only one specification is shown on Intel's Product Specifications website, which is just for quick reference. The processor's "family" determines which of the two Thermal Specifications is shown on the website. For Core i 7th and later processors, the website shows "Tjunction", while for 6th generation and earlier it's "Tcase", which includes Core 2 Quad processors such as the Q6600 and Q6700.

Tcase is a highly misleading specification that's been confusing users since 2006, because Tcase is NOT Core temperature. Tcase is a factory only temperature that's measured on laboratory engineering samples using a "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. The CPUs in our computers do not have this sensor, so users can not monitor IHS temperature. Moreover, since the cooler in a laptop is mounted directly on the silicon Die, there's no IHS, which is why there's no Tcase specification. Therefore, Tcase is irrelevant.

For desktop processors, Intel's intended purpose for providing a Tcase specification is primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions. And just so you know, the Tcase values currently shown on Intel's website for the Q6600 and Q6700 both have mistakes. There were 2 variants of the Q6600; the original 105 Watt B3 stepping revision and the later 95 Watt G0. The Q6700 was launched only as a 95 Watt G0 stepping revision. Regardless, for either variant, their respective Tcase values are still irrelevant and can simply be disregarded.

The other thermal specification, Tjunction, is where you need to focus your attention. In the datasheets, which use proper terminology, Tjunction is instead call "Tj Max" (Temperature Junction Maximum) which is also known as "Throttle" temperature. As with the vast majority of Intel processors, Throttle temperature (Tj Max)for the Q6600 G0 as well as the Q6700 is 100°C, which is your thermal limit. Tj Max is shown in utilities such as Core Temp and HWiNFO.



The consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders, expert overclockers and Intel Engineers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International Standard for "normal" is 22°C or 72°F.

All of this information is located in a "Sticky" that you should read; it's at the top of the CPUs forum:

Intel Temperature Guide

Once again, welcome aboard Cudero!

CT :sol:
Wow thanks for that information. It did seem rather weird to me, because I remember running the chip 80~83c without issues, and it was weird to find such a low tolerance.

well noted :)
 
Aug 3, 2020
7
0
10
0
Cudero,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Cudero and kiss-method,

There are a few points and misconceptions we need to clear up.

As kiss-method has already mentioned, you can confidently place your trust Core Temp and HWiNFO, which are frequently updated and know to be quite accurate. However, SpeedFan has been left to wither on the vine for many years, and has known issues. SpeedFan also has a steep learning curve, so if you haven't learned how to configure it correctly, it can be very misleading.

When referring to temperatures in SpeedFan, you need to be specific and differentiate between "CPU" temperature (rarely accurate) and "Core" temperatures. For certain processor / motherboard combinations, SpeedFan has a 15° offset "bug" where Core temperatures will be either too low or too high, which is no doubt what you're seeing and why you're confused. However, CPU temperature and Core temperatures can all be individually calibrated in the settings ... if you know where to look and how to do it.

From 65 nanometer Core 2 processors first launched in the 3rd quarter of 2006 through today's 14 nanometer 10th generation Core i processors, all Intel desktop processors have not just one, but two thermal specifications. The "operating temperature of 71°C" to which you referred is called the "Tcase" thermal specification, while the other is called the "Tjunction" thermal specification.

Both thermal specifications are shown on Intel's "Datasheets" which are very detailed technical documents, but only one specification is shown on Intel's Product Specifications website, which is just for quick reference. The processor's "family" determines which of the two Thermal Specifications is shown on the website. For Core i 7th generation and later processors, the website shows "Tjunction", while for 6th generation and earlier it's "Tcase", which includes Core 2 Quad processors such as the Q6600 and Q6700.

Tcase is a highly misleading specification that's been confusing users since 2006, because Tcase is NOT Core temperature. Tcase is a factory only temperature that's measured on laboratory engineering samples using a "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. The CPUs in our computers do not have this sensor, so users can not monitor IHS temperature. Moreover, since the cooler in a laptop is mounted directly on the silicon Die, there's no IHS, which is why there's no Tcase specification. Therefore, Tcase is irrelevant.

For desktop processors, Intel's intended purpose for providing a Tcase specification is primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions. And just so you know, the Tcase values currently shown on Intel's website for the Q6600 and Q6700 both have mistakes. There were 2 variants of the Q6600; the original 105 Watt B3 stepping revision and the later 95 Watt G0. The Q6700 was launched only as a 95 Watt G0 stepping revision. Regardless, for either variant, their respective Tcase values are still irrelevant and can simply be disregarded.

The other thermal specification, Tjunction, is where you need to focus your attention. In the datasheets, which use proper terminology, Tjunction is instead call "Tj Max" (Temperature Junction Maximum) which is also known as "Throttle" temperature. As with the vast majority of Intel processors, Throttle temperature (Tj Max)for the Q6600 G0 as well as the Q6700 is 100°C, which is your thermal limit. Tj Max is shown in utilities such as Core Temp and HWiNFO.



The consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders, expert overclockers and Intel Engineers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International Standard for "normal" is 22°C or 72°F.

All of this information is located in a "Sticky" that you should read; it's at the top of the CPUs forum:

Intel Temperature Guide

Once again, welcome aboard Cudero!

CT :sol:
Alright, so just to make sure and mark this as solved, I'll make a couple screenshots of the temps measured with HWiNFO this time both under load and at idle and post them here for confirmation (as far as I know thanks to CompuTronix's explanation, they should be okay).

I'll be a bit busy as I have to make a backup of my HDD so I'll get back here with the screenshots as soon as I've finished.
Once again, thanks for you kindness and I hope to keep learning with you guys :)
 
Last edited:
Aug 3, 2020
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Yes, that's correct.
Here are the temps! They look fine to me:

CPU and GPU while playing BF3:




Idle:





I made both idle screenshots right after closing the game, that probably explains the MAX temps at that moment (I didn't close the HWiNFO).

Anyway, if you need more info or new measurements just let me know :)
 

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