psychpath

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Feb 18, 2009
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I’m building a new gaming rig and am going to use the Intel Core i7 920 but looking on the Intel website there is a table of specifications that lists DDR3 as 1066MHz so would getting RAM higher than 1066MHz still work at the speed the RAM says it has been tested as.
 

xthekidx

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Dec 24, 2008
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Yes you just have to change the RAM multiplier to match the speed the modules are rated for. At stock settings, your system won't run the ram any faster, but changing that option in the BIOS takes 20 seconds.

Do you want help with your build? Post the items you are getting and we can help you chose better ones, or confirm that they are good choices.
 

psychpath

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Feb 18, 2009
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thanks it just that Intel confused me by listing RAM speeds on the specifications of the processor but if the processor wont slow down the ram than I can stretch my budget a bit further to get 1600MHz RAM instead of the 1066MHz version.
 

JDocs

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Apr 2, 2008
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Also I've read that its 1066mhz when using 6 chips or 1333mhz when using 3 chips. Not 100% sure about this but it might be worth looking into.
 

xthekidx

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Some motherboards have a hard time handling 6 modules of ram and so you have to slow down the speeds to make the system stable. Not all boards do this though, mostly just the cheaper ones. You should be able to run 6 modules at higher speeds if you buy a good mobo. Go to the manufacturer's website to see what kind of issues arise with more ram.
 

xthekidx

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Dec 24, 2008
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Yes it's the board. I own an i7, you can run them higher than 1333mhz or 1066mhz, look at my signature. Why do you think manufacturers are making 2000mhz DDR3 ram if there wasn't a platform that could run it?
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
A DDR3 P45 platform can run DDR3-2000. I never said i7 couldn't run it either. You said the board might not be stable with that number of ram sticks, I think its the CPU. The memory controller for the i7 is on the CPU, not the board.
 

xthekidx

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Dec 24, 2008
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The memory controller isn't the issue, there are many i7 systems that you can find on enthusiast websites that use 12 sticks of DDR3 ram at 1600mhz. The limitation is the board and if it can handle the amount of power to run that many modules at that frequency.