[SOLVED] PSU has 2x6-Pin Connectors and GPU has 1x6 and 1x8 Connector, are adaptors an option?

Feb 28, 2019
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Hi,

I am frankensteining a PC together. I have an Enermax ELT620AWT PSU (this one, looks the same, can't find it on the official site) and I am trying to pair it with a Palit GTX 770 Jetstream. This card has a 6 pin and an 8 pin power connector, as standard, and the PSU only has 2x6 pins outs for graphics.

I've heard bad things about convertors and it being better to buy a PSU, but that seems a little excessive. Are the horror stories true.

Given the PSU is 620W and is Crossfire & SLI certified it seems hard to believe it can't reliably power one card in a pretty bare-bones system.

Should I be looking for a PSU, or can I get away with something like this?

These are old parts, but I still don't want to build a brick.

Thanks,
Noki
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
It was a really good PSU when it came out, but it was nearly 15 years ago. It's an old, group-regulated design that uses 85 degree capacitors, and while you theoretically have enough power on the +12V rail that the PCIE cables use (it's a faux dual-rail, like most dual rails not in the very high-end because of the old ATX rules on rails), it's not something I want to gamble on with such an old power supply.

Now, add in the fact that you'd be using an adapter. This is a very common source of fires as these types of adapters are very cheaply made.

Given the age and the fact you'll regularly have a pretty strong crossload, I would not do this at all. Now, it's not as dangerous as some of the PSUs we see around here which are literal garbage, but the benefits aren't worth the risk to me.
 
Feb 28, 2019
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Just plain no :( OK, I guess it's not worth the risk. Just seems crazy that it this PSU can't give the goods.

I guess the way it's designed to delivery stable power is just incompatible. Thanks for the speedy reply.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
It was a really good PSU when it came out, but it was nearly 15 years ago. It's an old, group-regulated design that uses 85 degree capacitors, and while you theoretically have enough power on the +12V rail that the PCIE cables use (it's a faux dual-rail, like most dual rails not in the very high-end because of the old ATX rules on rails), it's not something I want to gamble on with such an old power supply.

Now, add in the fact that you'd be using an adapter. This is a very common source of fires as these types of adapters are very cheaply made.

Given the age and the fact you'll regularly have a pretty strong crossload, I would not do this at all. Now, it's not as dangerous as some of the PSUs we see around here which are literal garbage, but the benefits aren't worth the risk to me.
 
Feb 28, 2019
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OK Thanks for the detailed answer. I'll probably stick this in my dad's PC (to replace his un-branded PSU) so it least it see's some use. Looking into new PSU's today that can handle the load properly.

Thanks again.
 

edwjohn3

Commendable
Jul 22, 2017
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DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
There are adapters you can use to convert a 6 pin pcie power cable to an 8 pin connector. I powered an AMD Radeon HD 7950 with a Corsair HX 620w power supply for 5 years with zero issues using this 6 pin to 8 pin adapter:

https://www.amazon.com/StarTech-com-Express-Power-Adapter-Cable/dp/B001TK3TJY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?crid=1YJ2GVZYAKG7N&keywords=startech+pci+express+6+pin+to+8+pin+power+adapter+cable&qid=1551747484&s=gateway&sprefix=startech+pci&sr=8-1
Not every drunk driver wraps their car around a tree or a school bus. Doesn't make it safe or a good idea.
 

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