Put a resale value on this, please?

punkncat

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
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Cooler Master ITX cube case that I cannot recall the model number.
R3 1200
8GB of Crucial 2133 (2x4)
ASRock AB350 ITX AC (onboard Bluetooth and WiFi) not exact model number
EVGA GTX960 2G
Corsair CX430
Crucial 64GB SSD
2x 250GB HDD
Win 10 Home (activated)

Runs perfectly well, no issues. I have had it for sale for a while at what I thought was a marketable price and had no bites at all. What is your opinion on this system's value?
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
An odd one. A decent low end system with an okay graphics card, aside from the small drives.

Considering what you are offering I would not recommend someone to buy this system, but if I had to price it to sell, $300.

R3-1200 is a fine budget processor, and you've picked out a decent motherboard if it is the one I think it is.

Memory choice is poor, Ryzen responds very well to memory speed. Hard to get an equivalent for a GTX960, but something like a 1050Ti is a decent match.

I would not place any value on the drives. 64GB for the OS is barely enough. 2x250GB is very odd when there is almost not cost difference between a pair of 250GB drives and something like a 2TB hard drive.

Overall, there are brand new options out there just under $500 that have all of this and more. At $600 you can get the aforementioned 1050Ti.

You might be better off selling the GTX960 independently and picking up a really cheap GPU to turn that into a basic computer for web browsing.

 

punkncat

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I had it listed for $250, then went to $200. A friend's mother looked at it, but her son didn't want because it's "not a laptop".

Just about the only parts I can actually value are the mobo which is a few months old, the proc a year Oct, and the OS. The rest of the parts were recycled from previous builds/left over in the closet. Everything aside from the GPU and drives are less than a couple years old.
 

punkncat

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I don't disagree with you on certain points, for sure.
The RAM choice was made at the time of release for the Ryzen. At that time there were no decent BIOS revisions and RAM selection to mobo compat was of extreme importance. It plays well with the system, and benchmarks well within it's expected parameters.

I would also add that I actually have had three video cards on this system, two of them 960's. The 4G card I had was poor and actually turned out less frames than the 2G card, so I went with it and sold the other. It actually plays like a beast with a 1080 (and different PSU).

 

DSzymborski

Illustrious
Moderator
I'd definitely sell the parts individually. The configuration as a whole isn't that appealing, but parts like the CPU and the GPU have some value.

Even if we accept for the sake of argument that the RAM choice was something for which you had few options, it doesn't change the fact that someone buying something now has to evaluate RAM they purchase compared to what is actually available now, not what was available then; you being an early adopter has no benefit to a person buying your PC right now, in 10/18.
 

punkncat

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I have a drawer slap full of laptop drives I have upgraded to SSD for friends and family over the years. The CD tray for this case presented a perfect opportunity to put two of them side by side and stripe. It's where I put the Steam library and User files.


All in all, I figure that whoever might have need of a system they can build on would have a working option till upgrade. I just haven't found that individual yet.



Thanks for the opinions, fellas.

 


thats what would concern me, considering how long its been since anyone has made a mechanical drive at 250GB i wouldn't trust a computer with drives that old. especially with an SSD drive that can barely hold a full windows install

 

punkncat

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Apr 3, 2018
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I am not sure where people get the idea that 64GB isn't enough to hold Windows. It's fine for that part. The issue is when you actually try to put your other apps and programs on that same drive. The rest of that 30 GB fills up FAST. THEN the issue becomes not having the overhead for the updates.

It's not something I would build, today, but was an option to show it operational and not something I would spend money on to turn around and sell.
I was hedging that the "operational" would trump "parts in box", but the opinion here seems to indicate otherwise.

 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Most of the issue is redundancy. Good cpu, good mobo, decent gpu, good case. It's the rest combo that kills it. I'd not have an issue with purchasing a cpu/mobo combo and get my own ram for $200, but I'd not want to spend $300 for that combo just to toss the drives and ram and case and gpu. You'd do far better selling the parts individually than the pc as a whole. Keep the windows activation, windows might be free, but that key is legit and expensive, $100 by itself.

Personally, I'd either part it out or spend $60 for a 2Tb hdd and park it in the living room as a htpc.
 
Why are you selling?

If you can sell locally, that is good; shipping cases, even ITX ones can be expensive
It is worth what a buyer will pay for it.
The problem is that you don't have a sale until someone wants the package.

You might do better listing on ebay where you will get a lot more potential buyers.
If you can find something similar in used condition, filter on completed auctions.
In green, you will see what a similar item actually sold for.

If the full pc does not sell, break it up into two parts:

cpu/mobo/ram as one package. r3-1200 by itself is in the $60-$80 range.
Sell the GTX960 as a individual item.
That card seems to sell for about $70 by itself.
 

punkncat

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I originally purchased the (same) mobo and the R3 w/ listed RAM to replace a gaming computer I needed elsewhere for the office. It was near time to upgrade that one anyway, and was of a spec that will work well in the office spot for another year or two. I bought the proc with the specific idea to: A) check out Ryzen and then B) upgrade the complete system over the next year with either better Ryzen, or an Intel swap. I liked it well enough to go R7 1700.

I then took this system and moved it into the HTPC/gaming spot. I actually got some better RAM for it and a 1080 with new PSU. It did really well and I was looking to possibly upgrade it with an on sale R5/7....then....

A guy on a cycling forum I am part of gifted me an i58600K and mobo combo with RAM and cooler. He OC'ed it a bit hard and I considered it might be bricked. I had intended to gift this to a friend, but found there were some issues that I don't want to deal with after it (possibly) breaks later. Long story short is that it will take a very mild OC, which makes it possible to run the XMP profile, but any attempt to OC it hard and troubles arise. I opted to keep it.
I offered the AMD computer to the friend, as it would still be a minor upgrade to his current rig, but he is Intel guy and doesn't want.

So, I have this computer sitting, not being used currently. It would be good to have a backup considering the sketchy nature of the other build I was given. If it doesn't go bad then it just wastes. Even if it takes a while, I probably wouldn't go this direction again since I have the other and 9th gen is due soon.
 
Keep the pc as a spare if you have room for a second.

As to the 8600K, how high are you trying to overclock?
What is the motherboard you are using?

I found that I could not oc my 8600K to it's potential until I updated my motherboard bios to currency.
How hard is hard?
Probably any 8600K should be able to reach 4.7

Intel does not warrant how high you can oc a K.
But, the chip is still under warranty so Intel might well honor a rma if you can claim some defect.

 

punkncat

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I have another thread going on the i5 'issues'. The consensus is that the cheapo "gaming" Gigabyte combo mobo got the VRM's damaged by attempts to OC over 5ghz. The fellow I got it from posted a bunch of benchmarks of his attempts.

I have been able to get it stable at 4.5 with the voltage set on auto. Any attempt to change the voltage results in a crash that requires a full re-install. Trying to turn on XMP without the OC did the same. Just running 'stock' settings and it ran some bench tests for several days and stayed stable. It basically needs a new mobo, think the CPU is fine.

My plan is to keep it until it either fails, or until the 9th gen chipsets are released to see if they are changing socket/backwards compatible and go from there.
 

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