Question Question electrolytic capacitor

Dec 11, 2020
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I have electronic devices from 1990 and I know that these devices that have not been used for a long time cause faults and depolarization in the electrolytic capacitors, is it necessary to use these devices in the interval of 1x a month to preserve the electrolytic capacitors from failing due to disuse? are used electrolytic capacitors manufactured since 1990 and assembled in electronic circuit
 
No, the caps are going to die whenever they are going to die, using the device or not will not change that, maybe in theory it will but not in practice.

What you could do is to replace all the capacitors as long as the device still works normally, before a cap blows out which could cause problems on the board.
But even that is not really necessary.
 
Modern caps like that just depolarize and lose capacitance until they are reformed. When you go to use the device again just power it up and don't expect it to work for awhile until they do. The bigger issue is the electrolyte in some could've dried out and then it still won't work until those are replaced

Now, with vintage pre-WW2 era paper caps you'll probably want to remove them from the device and gradually reform them starting with lower voltages, because applying full voltage right away to those could cause them to explode.
 
Electrolytic caps of that vintage should not fail even if they do depolarize and full voltage is applied, so what use is preventing it? They lose capacitance and fail because they are filled with water and have only a rubber seal. No seal is perfect.

Tantalum caps on the other hand may catch on fire so reduced initial voltage is suggested after long disuse, especially if stored at very high temperatures or rated >25v.
 
Dec 11, 2020
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to use the electronics of 1990 that have electrolytic capacitors every month? otherwise they lose capacitance, depolarize and have failures?
 
Is this proven? Is this rule only for new and off-the-shelf electrolytic capacitors or also for used electrolytic capacitors from 1990 and assembled in electronic circuits?
Used or not, the problem is the same. There's a chemical reaction between the aluminum oxide film and the electrolyte that causes the film to weaken. When this material is weakened, the dissipation of the electrolyte causes a decrease in ESR and leakage current and an increase in capacitance.

I suggest an ESR meter. You can also "reform" the capacitors. Google it.
 
Googling for variations of this question leads me to believe this is a bot spamming forums across the internet because the same question is posed over and over with apparently no comprehension of the answers, only repeating the same question if there are any replies.

I especially like the guy who told them to stop worrying about the lifespan of their SNES
 
Googling for variations of this question leads me to believe this is a bot spamming forums across the internet because the same question is posed over and over with apparently no comprehension of the answers, only repeating the same question if there are any replies.

I especially like the guy who told them to stop worrying about the lifespan of their SNES
Except OP has 30 other posts here completely unrelated to this subject. :D
 
Dec 11, 2020
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What is your recommendation for my case where the electrolytic capacitors used are mounted on an electronic device from 1990? I know that the chemical reaction occurs but what is the maximum interval without use allowed to avoid damage to the electrolytic capacitors?
 
What is your recommendation for my case where the electrolytic capacitors used are mounted on an electronic device from 1990? I know that the chemical reaction occurs but what is the maximum interval without use allowed to avoid damage to the electrolytic capacitors?
There's no fixed interval. It depends on the actual capacitor and the environment that it's been stored in.

Get/borrow/rent an ESR meter or a DMM with a capacitive measurement function.
 
Dec 11, 2020
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My goal is to keep some old electronics from 1990 that I own but my friend said that if I don't use them every month, their electrolytic capacitors will depolarize and lose capacitance and fail due to disuse
 
Googling for variations of this question leads me to believe this is a bot spamming forums across the internet because the same question is posed over and over with apparently no comprehension of the answers, only repeating the same question if there are any replies.

I especially like the guy who told them to stop worrying about the lifespan of their SNES
Actually... I do see that a different variation of "cloudff" has posted this same question on a dozen other forums over the past year. How strange.
 
Dec 11, 2020
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Do you have any concrete information for the storage time of electrolytic capacitors in electronic circuits and manufactured since 1990? 1 month, 1 year, 2 years etc

I don't mean new and spare electrolytic capacitors?
 
There are a lot of other things to consider when attempting to store electronic devices for long durations. You are over 30 years now. If you are attempting to store them for another 30 years you should also consider environmental factors. Things deteriorate and there isn't a thing you can do about it. Neutrinos are subatomic particles that pass through everything, including the planet. Billions of them pass through every cubic centimeter of matter every second. They rarely interact with matter but "rarely" does not mean "never" so they are bombarding your electronic devices constantly and sooner or later damage will occur and there is nothing you can do to prevent it.
 

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