Question Risk of system getting hacked through the internet or Wi-fi?

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Wolfshadw

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Smart Computer Use.
Password protection.
Anti-Virus.
Anti-Malware.
Secure/Encrypted WiFi.

These are all just deterrents. As I stated way back in post #2, then ONLY way to 100% secure a system is to completely disconnect it from any network.

-Wolf sends
 

USAFRet

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Add to the above - Keep the OS updated.


I've been reading this over the last few days, and I think your fears are a bit overblown. IMHO.
Be cognizant of where you go, don't download stupid junk...that prevents the vast majority of issues. AKA, Smart Computer Use.
 

emilfrederiksen

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Add to the above - Keep the OS updated.

I've been reading this over the last few days, and I think your fears are a bit overblown. IMHO.
Be cognizant of where you go, don't download stupid junk...that prevents the vast majority of issues. AKA, Smart Computer Use.
I agree, my fears are a bit exagerated. But I really appreciate the many good people on here, who give me greats answers according to my setup, setttings etc.
 

emilfrederiksen

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Smart Computer Use.
Password protection.
Anti-Virus.
Anti-Malware.
Secure/Encrypted WiFi.

These are all just deterrents. As I stated way back in post #2, then ONLY way to 100% secure a system is to completely disconnect it from any network.

-Wolf sends
I can say yes to all above, just need to be 100 % sure about the one with Password protection
 

BogdanH

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...just need to be 100 % sure about the one with Password protection
You mean, if you're the only user and you use Windows password protection.. what does this protection do?
It protects you against.. you. Majority of users aren't that computer savvy, they don't know what could be dangerous for system. They just install/run stuff, change settings they don't know much about, etc. Because of that, average user should have two password protected accounts: as administrator and as user.
 

hotaru.hino

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If my Windows user is password protected, what does it protect against?
If we dont include someone having physical access to the PC.
Other devices on my network from getting access to my system?
Against hackers from getting access to my system through the internet?
Adding a password to a user account in an OS is to make sure nobody can just masquerade as you and do things that your account has permission to do. It doesn't prevent attacks if you do something that lets an attacker in however, like clicking on a malicious link or something.

Add to the above - Keep the OS updated.
It hurts my head when people avoid OS updates like the plague.
 

BogdanH

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It hurts my head when people avoid OS updates like the plague.
:)
I'm one of those. In short, try to understand that some have reasons for that decision... and many times that decision is based on long personal experience (is not about privacy "paranoia").
But in general, yes, keeping OS up to date is always good advice.
 

emilfrederiksen

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You mean, if you're the only user and you use Windows password protection.. what does this protection do?
It protects you against.. you. Majority of users aren't that computer savvy, they don't know what could be dangerous for system. They just install/run stuff, change settings they don't know much about, etc. Because of that, average user should have two password protected accounts: as administrator and as user.
When I visited my parents, and I helped them with file-sharing between two laptops of theirs. They had to enter Windows user password, when they wanted to access a shared folder of another system on the network.

Is that the only protection, a Windows user password would have against other people / hackers on the same network, they have to enter password to access a shared folder?
And what about attacks over the internet?
 

emilfrederiksen

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Adding a password to a user account in an OS is to make sure nobody can just masquerade as you and do things that your account has permission to do. It doesn't prevent attacks if you do something that lets an attacker in however, like clicking on a malicious link or something.
But does it protect against / make it harder / another layer security, regarding attacks from another person / hacker on the same network?
And what about attacks over the internet?
 

USAFRet

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When I visited my parents, and I helped them with file-sharing between two laptops of theirs. They had to enter Windows user password, when they wanted to access a shared folder of another system on the network.

Is that the only protection, a Windows user password would have against other people / hackers on the same network, they have to enter password to access a shared folder?
And what about attacks over the internet?
'attacks over the internet' is handled by your router.
Unrequested access from outside your LAN is simply thrown away.

Every system, all over the planet, gets access requests like that all the time. Yours, mine, everyone.


Accessing a shared folder...that person needs to be attached to your actual house LAN.Presumably, you know who these people are.

Of course, NOTHING is safe if YOU download and run some malicious code.
This circles back around to 'Safe Practices'.

Like the current concept of wearing a mask in public.
 

emilfrederiksen

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'attacks over the internet' is handled by your router.
Unrequested access from outside your LAN is simply thrown away.

Every system, all over the planet, gets access requests like that all the time. Yours, mine, everyone.


Accessing a shared folder...that person needs to be attached to your actual house LAN.Presumably, you know who these people are.

Of course, NOTHING is safe if YOU download and run some malicious code.
This circles back around to 'Safe Practices'.

Like the current concept of wearing a mask in public.
So Windows user password does not help against attacks over the internet?

If the devices are on the same network, they can see shared folders. My Wi-fi has a range outside my house, and I can also see other Wi-fi / networks fron my neighbours.
 

USAFRet

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So Windows user password does not help against attacks over the internet?

If the devices are on the same network, they can see shared folders. My Wi-fi has a range outside my house, and I can also see other Wi-fi / networks fron my neighbours.
Yes, a Windows password helps against access from 'outside'.
But first, they'd have to get past the router.

Yes, you can see all the WiFi from your neighbors. You can't access any of those, can you?
This is where a strong WiFi password comes in.
 

hotaru.hino

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:)
I'm one of those. In short, try to understand that some have reasons for that decision... and many times that decision is based on long personal experience (is not about privacy "paranoia").
But in general, yes, keeping OS up to date is always good advice.
I understand why they do it, because OS updates can sometimes screw things up. I just don't understand why they take it to the extreme. Like I don't always jump on the latest and greatest update. I usually give it a week or two or whenever Windows really starts to complain before updating and that's been a good "dust settling" time. While I don't believe that's the only thing, I do believe this is one of the things that apparently allows me to experience something that people think is impossible: I don't have problems with Windows updates.

But does it protect against / make it harder / another layer security, regarding attacks from another person / hacker on the same network?
And what about attacks over the internet?
I'll throw in a practical example. Let's say you have a shared folder over the network that requires some sort of login credential. If you didn't have a password, if I'm on your network and I see this folder being shared, I can just walk in if I know just your username. If there is a password, then I have to know that too. Getting your username is much easier than getting your password.
 

USAFRet

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I understand why they do it, because OS updates can sometimes screw things up. I just don't understand why they take it to the extreme. Like I don't always jump on the latest and greatest update. I usually give it a week or two or whenever Windows really starts to complain before updating and that's been a good "dust settling" time. While I don't believe that's the only thing, I do believe this is one of the things that apparently allows me to experience something that people think is impossible: I don't have problems with Windows updates.
I use one or two of my lesser, easily recoverable systems first.
A VM, and then the ancient laptop, and on up.
My main system is generally the last in the house to get the updates.

But that is only a week or two.

"I've disabled Windows Updates completely!" is false security.
And objectively dangerous.
 

emilfrederiksen

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Yes, a Windows password helps against access from 'outside'.
But first, they'd have to get past the router.

Yes, you can see all the WiFi from your neighbors. You can't access any of those, can you?
This is where a strong WiFi password comes in.
'outside'
Over the internet?
Or if they hack / breach my router, and get access to my network?
 

USAFRet

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'outside'
Over the internet?
Or if they hack / breach my router, and get access to my network?
'outside' = External to your LAN.

If someone is within WiFi range, AND they know your WiFi password, they have access
If your have port forwarding open on your router for something, they might be able to gain access.
If someone sneaks into your house, and connects an ethernet cable to your router, they can have access.
 

emilfrederiksen

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I'll throw in a practical example. Let's say you have a shared folder over the network that requires some sort of login credential. If you didn't have a password, if I'm on your network and I see this folder being shared, I can just walk in if I know just your username. If there is a password, then I have to know that too. Getting your username is much easier than getting your password.
No file or folder sharing enabled
Network discovery is turned off
File and printer sharing is turned off

I run a net share command
And i got the same result as this


1.
Are those default shared folders? The screenshot

2.
Can they see any of my shared folders / do I have any shared folders?
 

emilfrederiksen

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If someone is within WiFi range, AND they know your WiFi password, they have access
If your have port forwarding open on your router for something, they might be able to gain access.
If someone sneaks into your house, and connects an ethernet cable to your router, they can have access.
I don't have port forwarding

I just want to be sure about what you exactly mean.

1
If they access my network via Wi-fi password or cable, they would still have to know my Windows user password, to be able to access my system?

2
If they don't have access to my network, they would still have to know my Windows user password, to be able to access my system?

3
You wrote earlier:
"But first, they'd have to get past the router."
Router firewall?
Or router passwords for Wi-fi?

Thank you for your many replies, much appreciated
 

emilfrederiksen

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Anyone that can help with this?

No file or folder sharing enabled
Network discovery is turned off
File and printer sharing is turned off

I run a net share command
And i got the same result as this


1.
Are those default shared folders? The screenshot

2.
Can they see any of my shared folders / do I have any shared folders?
 

emilfrederiksen

Commendable
Jul 6, 2018
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You mean, if you're the only user and you use Windows password protection.. what does this protection do?
It protects you against.. you. Majority of users aren't that computer savvy, they don't know what could be dangerous for system. They just install/run stuff, change settings they don't know much about, etc. Because of that, average user should have two password protected accounts: as administrator and as user.
Just would like to know / get some source, if somone wanted to access my PC via the network or via the internet, they would be blocked / having to enter my Windows user password. Like I experienced, when I wanted to access a shared folder on my parents network.
 

emilfrederiksen

Commendable
Jul 6, 2018
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'outside' = External to your LAN.

If someone is within WiFi range, AND they know your WiFi password, they have access
If your have port forwarding open on your router for something, they might be able to gain access.
If someone sneaks into your house, and connects an ethernet cable to your router, they can have access.
I would really much like if you could answer my questions above

Thank you!
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Just would like to know / get some source, if somone wanted to access my PC via the network or via the internet, they would be blocked / having to enter my Windows user password. Like I experienced, when I wanted to access a shared folder on my parents network.
If a resource needs a password to access it, then it needs a password.
Shared folder, router log in, whatever...
 

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