Question Risk of system getting hacked through the internet or Wi-fi?

emilfrederiksen

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Jul 6, 2018
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Dear everyone



I am not a high profile person or anything like that. I just dislike the idea, that someone with bad intentions could access my personal files, documents, photos etc. (personal diary, baby pictures of my children etc.)

I am not worried about anyone getting a look at my internet traffic / man-in-the-middle attack etc. I am only concerned about, that someone with bad intentions being able to access my personal files.

I assume, that it is not impossible to “hack” my system and get access to my files, but “how hard” would it be for someone commited to the task?

Is the only way to access my files, if they planted malware on my system?

Or if they accessed screen share?


My questions concerns both:

If the person accessed / hacked my wi-fi / home network

Or

Only through the internet


Settings:

Microsoft Windows 10 Home

Windows login password protected

Windows Defender firewall

No file or folder sharing enabled

Network discovery is turned off

File and printer sharing is turned off

AVG registers threats in real-time

All software drivers etc. fully updated



Wi-fi is password protected

Network / Wi-fi profile: Private

Router security WPA2-Personal



I become uneasy, when I read posts like this, which makes it sound “easy”:

https://www.quora.com/Can-a-hacker-control-my-computer-through-Wi-Fi-connection-only/answer/Aaron-Shbeeb

https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-hack-a-computer-on-same-network/answer/Harshit-Dangwal



Please let me know, if I shall add more info concerning the above.

Thanks in advance for replying


Best regards
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
The only way to 100% secure a computer is to completely disconnect it from any network. As for how difficult, unless you're doing something you shouldn't be doing (visiting unsavory web sites, clicking links in e-mails from unknowns, downloading software from questionable sources, running an unprotected PC/Network), unless someone has a real grudge against you, it's not worth their time.

-Wolf sends
 

hotaru.hino

Respectable
It's difficult to say how hard something is, because it depends entirely on the skill level, tools, or any exploits that may be lingering around.

However, if you do want to close up as many holes as possible, I recommend running a Nessus scan on your network. It'll make note of anything that could be easily exploited.
 
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emilfrederiksen

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It's difficult to say how hard something is, because it depends entirely on the skill level, tools, or any exploits that may be lingering around.

However, if you do want to close up as many holes as possible, I recommend running a Nessus scan on your network. It'll make note of anything that could be easily exploited.
The Nessus scan, does it only check the network, or also the connected devices to the network?
 

emilfrederiksen

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visiting unsavory web sites, clicking links in e-mails from unknowns, downloading software from questionable sources, running an unprotected PC/Network
The only ways a hacker could access my personal files through the internet, is if I:
visiting unsavory web sites, clicking links in e-mails from unknowns, downloading software from questionable sources?

"running an unprotected PC/Network"

Could you please elaborate this?
 

emilfrederiksen

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Just to be clear.

If you are carrying a mobile phone in your pocket, and like most folks is the primary way in which you take pictures, surf, communicate....your PC is the LEAST of your worries.
I never leave my phone out of sight. I rarely travel or stay populated places. I have all my photos etc. copied to my PC.

Could you please explain what you mean exactly?
 
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Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
The only ways a hacker could access my personal files through the internet, is if I:
visiting unsavory web sites, clicking links in e-mails from unknowns, downloading software from questionable sources?

"running an unprotected PC/Network"

Could you please elaborate this?
Does each user account on your devices require a password to login?
Is your WiFi network encrypted (WPA2)?
Is a password required to access your WiFi network?

If the answer to any of these questions is, "No", then you are running an unprotected PC/Network and you are more vulnerable than most.

-Wolf sends
 
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BogdanH

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Even everything said above is technically true, there's no reason for "average dude" to become paranoid.
Usual precautions, like password protected router and properly firewalled (inbound + outbound) PC already make good enough protection from outside. The rest is up to user (web content, eMails, software being installed/used, etc.). In most cases data breach happens from inside -especially if you're not the only one using PC.
And finally, it depends on how "hot target" you are... if someone has big enough interest on your data, there's always a way.. sooner or later.
 
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emilfrederiksen

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Does each user account on your devices require a password to login?
I only have 1 user on my system. I assume it is password protected, when i Windows button + L, and need to enter password get access again. But whenever I turn on my PC (from shutdown), I am not being asked to enter password, only when i Restart - is it still password protected then?
 

emilfrederiksen

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^ This is to say that you aren't aware of the data that Google/Apple are collecting on you while carrying a mobile device around with you all day?
Your mobile carrier?
(the government?)
Thank you for elbarorating.

Regarding that, I have a "hope" / being "naive", that these big cooperations handle my / our data with respect, and not any malicious intent. But this is a big topic indeed aswell.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
I only have 1 user on my system. I assume it is password protected, when i Windows button + L, and need to enter password get access again. But whenever I turn on my PC (from shutdown), I am not being asked to enter password, only when i Restart - is it still password protected then?
It's only password protected if you actually have to enter a password to access the system.
 

emilfrederiksen

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It's only password protected if you actually have to enter a password to access the system.
When i Restart or Windows + L, I have to enter password.
When I Shutdown and turn on PC, I don't have to enter password.

So is it password protected or not, in the sense what your wrote earlier:
"Does each user account on your devices require a password to login? "
?
 

emilfrederiksen

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Then it's not password protected. Don't know why you have to enter it after a restart and not after a shutdown.

-Wolf sends
My mistake. I only have to enter password when i Log off, not when Shutdown and Restart.

In Optins - Setting for logon - Password
When I press change, it shows my user profile and asks for Current password

So would you still say, that my local user is not password protected?
 

emilfrederiksen

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If at any time you can access your system without entering a password, it's vulnerable.

-Wolf sends
If some hacker would try to get access to my system, when would that person be met with having to enter my password for my user?

I can't figure out, wether my system is password protected or not, given the how I explained it above.
 

BogdanH

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You SHOULD be requested each time you power up or restart your system.
Depends... (I have home PC in mind).
If more than one person has access to (or uses) particular PC, then creating multiple accounts is always good advice. It increases system overview (starting with personal settings, etc.) and prevents whole system (Windows) to become messy.
But if we have security/ privacy in mind, then password protected OS alone, means nothing. If files aren't encrypted, then anyone (who has physical access to PC) can read/copy/modify/destroy files on drive without even entering Windows. Me personally, I'm not really a fan of encrypted files... because if something goes wrong, then it can happen we loose all data (because we can't simply "recover").
Other option (to prevent unauthorized access) would be password protected BIOS, where we also disable all bootable devices except our C drive (OS). Sounds nice at first sight.. but if someone has bootable Windows drive in his pocket, he can replace two cables (SATA assumed), and use his drive as C drive and reading data from other drives in PC becomes trivial.
But at the end, if someone is really that keen on our data, he can simply steal whole drive.. and so, encryption is still the best as it seems.

As usual, just sharing my thoughts
 

sonofjesse

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Jul 27, 2016
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Turn off all wireless cards, wired cards, BT etc on your PC, and quit carrying your cell phone. Carry a pen and paper.

They can still hack and steal your identify if you do this........

Can't live in fear......just got to be wise and keep things patched.
 
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emilfrederiksen

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If my Windows user is password protected, what does it protect against?
If we dont include someone having physical access to the PC.
Other devices on my network from getting access to my system?
Against hackers from getting access to my system through the internet?
 

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