Question Router placement

Sep 10, 2018
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Hi everyone.
Right now I have an ADSL router on the first floor, inside my room. I have WiFi on the first floor at the top of the desk (good signal), however not on the second one. The signal becomes way too weak and sometimes it doesn't detect it at all.

I am soon getting a Speed Booster, HA-35, it basically uses 4G + ADSL. That's to increase speed, considering I can't get VDSL or even FTTH where I live. It will be placed on the second floor however since that's where I have good 4G+ signal (I wish I could put it somewhere in the middle but I won't have good 4G if I do). The current router I have will be gone, I am not allowed to keep it.

My question is:

Considering with this ADSL router I don't have WiFi upstairs, does that mean I won't have WiFi downstairs once I put the new router upstairs? My goal is to have WiFi on both. I don't care that much of the signal, if it's half (downstairs) I will be happy, but if it's 1/4 or even nothing at all then there is going to be an issue.
Last but not least, is there a way to strengthen wifi signal from settings without having to purchase things like extenders etc?

''Finally, wireless signals tend to be stronger below the router than above it, so when placing the router, the higher the better.
If you plan to use the same one upstairs and downstairs, consider placing the modem/router upstairs, if possible.
''

I read this somewhere. Is it true?

P.S Sorry for the lack of knowledge.
Comment
 
The antenna on most routers are designed to concentrate the power horizontally. The signal comes out the sides of most antenna rather than the top and bottom. If the device has external antenna you could try to reposition them. You could also try to tilt the router if they are internal. Very hit and miss hot much this helps. Floor/ceiling absorb a lot of radio energy. The other issue is it is not just the router your end device also has to send its signal back.

The long term solution likely will be something like powerline networks to get the signal between the floor. A ethenet cable of course would be much better. You would place a AP on the far end to create a source of radio signals. There are powerline units with AP built into the remote end.
 
Sep 10, 2018
53
0
530
0
The antenna on most routers are designed to concentrate the power horizontally. The signal comes out the sides of most antenna rather than the top and bottom. If the device has external antenna you could try to reposition them. You could also try to tilt the router if they are internal. Very hit and miss hot much this helps. Floor/ceiling absorb a lot of radio energy. The other issue is it is not just the router your end device also has to send its signal back.

The long term solution likely will be something like powerline networks to get the signal between the floor. A ethenet cable of course would be much better. You would place a AP on the far end to create a source of radio signals. There are powerline units with AP built into the remote end.
My PC will be connected via an ethernet cable. Basically it will be right next to the router. However, I would like to have wifi on the first floor too where we chill with devices like tablet, mobile phones etc. The antennas in both routers are internal by the way.

I am at said house right now, and I placed my old router in the place where I am going to put the new one (upstairs, right above living room). I tested wifi downstairs and it was pretty decent, half full signal and could access pages and stuff with no issues. Hopefully new router is not any worse.
 
If it is you can always turn off the radios on the new router and use the old router as a AP. In effect you put the old routers radios into the new router. I suspect they will be more or less the same. The router manufactures have figured out how to transmit at maximum legal levels even on pretty much all routers. There is not huge difference in most cases.

The signal levels actually are not the most important factor many times. The interference from outside sources tend to be the problem. A very weak signal with no interference will actually perform better than a very strong signal where there is also a very strong source of interference.
 

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