[SOLVED] ryzen 3 2200u temp question

packersfan036

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i have a dell laptop i just bought its a inspiron 15 3000 series. it has a ryzen 3 2200u apu. the apu tdp is 95c the temps have gotten higher than that for only a sec. so i repasted the apu, and bumped down the apu power to 99%. seems to have made it better. so my question is this ryzen apu suppose to run warm/hot??
 

Phaaze88

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That's normal for laptops - no kidding.
It is the nature of the beast; a con of cramming cpus and gpus in such confined spaces.

In order for newer laptops to support higher core/thread count cpus, manufacturer's are going to have to make them(coolers) bigger.
And who's going to want to haul around an over 20lb/9kg laptop?
 
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Phaaze88

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Laptop parts - notably the cpu and gpu, normally run hotter than their desktop counterparts, even though they have far lower power limits - not sure if you knew that or not, but thought I'd state it anyway.
Temps in the 90s isn't unheard of for a laptop cpu; not the case for it's desktop cousin that gets to enjoy far more spacious 'room and board'.
Paste application has a minor impact compared to power settings and the cooler/heatsink itself.

The laptop's being used on a flat surface, and not your lap(ironically), that might block the exhaust vents?
Running the balanced power plan instead of the high performance one, which is just going to increase power use = higher temps?
Already using a cooling pad?
 
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packersfan036

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Laptop parts - notably the cpu and gpu, normally run hotter than their desktop counterparts, even though they have far lower power limits - not sure if you knew that or not, but thought I'd state it anyway.
Temps in the 90s isn't unheard of for a laptop cpu; not the case for it's desktop cousin that gets to enjoy far more spacious 'room and board'.
Paste application has a minor impact compared to power settings and the cooler/heatsink itself.

The laptop's being used on a flat surface, and not your lap(ironically), that might block the exhaust vents?
Running the balanced power plan instead of the high performance one, which is just going to increase power use = higher temps?
Already using a cooling pad?
thanks for the advice i appreciate it, the power plan im using is the ryzen balanced plan, yes im using a laptop cooler, should i switch the power plan to windows balanced? or leave it on the ryzen balanced plan? i have also lowered the apu power to 99% which seems to help.
 

packersfan036

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The paste brand and application play a very minor role in cooling - assuming the manufacturer of the laptop didn't do a crap job applying it in the first place...
Heatsink>Fan(s)>Paste application>Paste Brand.
i used corsair thermal paste, the laptop has one fan, the laptop model is a dell inspiron 3585 just bought it. the dell paste job was ok, they over pasted it, and i heard dell uses crappy paste. my re-paste has seemed to help.
 
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Phaaze88

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This backs up my suspicion that the cooler is crap:
https://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-of-the-Dell-Inspiron-15-3585-Locked-In-Office-Ryzen.424262.0.html
Temperature
Unlike the HP and both Acer notebooks the Inspiron did not remain particularly cool under load despite its massive thermal throttling. Even when idle the surfaces warmed up to 31 °C and maxed out at 47 °C under load at the bottom. Using the Inspiron on your lap under load is thus not advisable.
Fan vent behind the display hinge
The hot spot was located in the center towards the rear near the fan vents. To make matters worse the vents are half-way covered by the display hinge heating up the bottom portion of the display and causing a significant accumulation of heat.
AMD’s CPUs are very obviously not as optimized and efficient as Intel’s counterparts. However, that is only half the truth. The other half is Dell’s poor and thoughtless cooling solution that we already criticized when reviewing the similarly restricted Inspiron 15 5575.
...
Our attempt to run our standard stress test of Prime95 and FurMark simultaneously for at least one hour was cut short after just a few minutes. The device crashed and rebooted, further confirming our suspicion that the cooling solution is simply inadequate for AMD’s Ryzen. Basically, the device shut off in order to protect the CPU and GPU from further damage. A second attempt with a smaller FurMark window was successful.
Clock speeds rarely exceeded 550 MHz from the very start of the test. The CPU was thus throttling severely in order to keep cool. Compare this intolerable frequency to the Ryzen 3 2300U's base clock speed of 2 GHz! The GPU ran at around 400 MHz and thus far below the Vega 6’s theoretical maximum of up to 1.1 GHz. Temperatures and clock speeds settled after less than 10 minutes. The GPU ran at around 55 °C, just like during our gaming tests, and the CPU at no more than 350 MHz (!) on all four cores and a temperature of around 80 °C.
 
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packersfan036

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This backs up my suspicion that the cooler is crap:
https://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-of-the-Dell-Inspiron-15-3585-Locked-In-Office-Ryzen.424262.0.html
Temperature
Unlike the HP and both Acer notebooks the Inspiron did not remain particularly cool under load despite its massive thermal throttling. Even when idle the surfaces warmed up to 31 °C and maxed out at 47 °C under load at the bottom. Using the Inspiron on your lap under load is thus not advisable.
Fan vent behind the display hinge
The hot spot was located in the center towards the rear near the fan vents. To make matters worse the vents are half-way covered by the display hinge heating up the bottom portion of the display and causing a significant accumulation of heat.
AMD’s CPUs are very obviously not as optimized and efficient as Intel’s counterparts. However, that is only half the truth. The other half is Dell’s poor and thoughtless cooling solution that we already criticized when reviewing the similarly restricted Inspiron 15 5575.
...
Our attempt to run our standard stress test of Prime95 and FurMark simultaneously for at least one hour was cut short after just a few minutes. The device crashed and rebooted, further confirming our suspicion that the cooling solution is simply inadequate for AMD’s Ryzen. Basically, the device shut off in order to protect the CPU and GPU from further damage. A second attempt with a smaller FurMark window was successful.
Clock speeds rarely exceeded 550 MHz from the very start of the test. The CPU was thus throttling severely in order to keep cool. Compare this intolerable frequency to the Ryzen 3 2300U's base clock speed of 2 GHz! The GPU ran at around 400 MHz and thus far below the Vega 6’s theoretical maximum of up to 1.1 GHz. Temperatures and clock speeds settled after less than 10 minutes. The GPU ran at around 55 °C, just like during our gaming tests, and the CPU at no more than 350 MHz (!) on all four cores and a temperature of around 80 °C.
I agree, it is a single and very thin heatsink, and only one fan, it is what is is!!!
 
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packersfan036

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The paste brand and application play a very minor role in cooling - assuming the manufacturer of the laptop didn't do a crap job applying it in the first place...
Heatsink>Fan(s)>Paste application>Paste Brand.
the temps still get up to the 90s under a load. i guess its just the nature of the beast, what do you think?
 

Phaaze88

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That's normal for laptops - no kidding.
It is the nature of the beast; a con of cramming cpus and gpus in such confined spaces.

In order for newer laptops to support higher core/thread count cpus, manufacturer's are going to have to make them(coolers) bigger.
And who's going to want to haul around an over 20lb/9kg laptop?
 
Reactions: packersfan036

packersfan036

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May 27, 2015
1,628
23
5,795
2
That's normal for laptops - no kidding.
It is the nature of the beast; a con of cramming cpus and gpus in such confined spaces.

In order for newer laptops to support higher core/thread count cpus, manufacturer's are going to have to make them(coolers) bigger.
And who's going to want to haul around an over 20lb/9kg laptop?
lol very true, i read the notebook check article you posted on here and it makes perfect sense. thanks for all your help, i really appreciate it, take care.
 

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