Question Somethings wrong with my BRAND NEW gaming rig.

Dec 11, 2019
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So my new pc just arrived a couple days ago, I downloaded every driver I needed, but it keeps crashing in every game, the screen freezes, goes black and says no signal. The other one is when the audio bugs out, loops in a weird tone, then I have to turn it off, and restart it. Please help me, its a BRAND NEW pc.

Specs: Cooler Master MWE 550 W 80+ bronze psu
asus prime b450m-a mobo
ryzen 5 2600 3,4 GHz 6-core processor
patriot 16 GB viper 4 DDR4 3000 MHz ram
msi radeon rx 590 8 gb armor gpu
kingston a400 240 gb ssd
toshiba p300 1 tb hdd
 

Diddly

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Is it only in games that it crashes, what about cinebench/3dmark? Have you tried memtest86+ ? If you can try and narrow it down to RAM or GPU that would be a start. Did you build it yourself or was it built by a company? If it was through a company you should get in touch with their tech support - possibly RMA it.
 
Dec 11, 2019
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What do I need to do in cinebench?
And how do I use memtest?
ok edit : I used cinebench, it didn't crash.
 
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Dcopymope

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Aug 13, 2018
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So my new pc just arrived a couple days ago, I downloaded every driver I needed, but it keeps crashing in every game, the screen freezes, goes black and says no signal. The other one is when the audio bugs out, loops in a weird tone, then I have to turn it off, and restart it. Please help me, its a BRAND NEW pc.

Specs: Cooler Master MWE 550 W 80+ bronze psu
asus prime b450m-a mobo
ryzen 5 2600 3,4 GHz 6-core processor
patriot 16 GB viper 4 DDR4 3000 MHz ram
msi radeon rx 590 8 gb armor gpu
kingston a400 240 gb ssd
toshiba p300 1 tb hdd
Whenever an application keeps freezing and crashing, usually the first culprit is the power supply, and that's exactly what I am finding to be the problem just from looking at its wattage. Whatever company built your PC for you should have asked you what kind of applications are you intending to run it on. If you are just using it to run less demanding applications like Microsoft Office, then a 550W PSU would be just fine. But if you are running any type of application that involves rendering scenes, be it video editors like Adobe After Effects, 3DS Max, or a video game, then you need to double the wattage of whatever your GPU says is the recommended amount to power your entire PC. This is a common sense approach as it ensures you have enough room to run any application, and its also a future proofing method in case you want to upgrade to an even higher end GPU. According to the A+ course I took, your true recommended wattage is more like 1100 watts, meaning you shouldn't settle for anything less than 1,000 watts with your particular GPU. The gold rating isn't going to do anything for you if the wattage isn't there.

 
Dec 11, 2019
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Whenever an application keeps freezing and crashing, usually the first culprit is the power supply, and that's exactly what I am finding to be the problem just from looking at its wattage. Whatever company built your PC for you should have asked you what kind of applications are you intending to run it on. If you are just using it to run less demanding applications like Microsoft Office, then a 550W PSU would be just fine. But if you are running any type of application that involves rendering scenes, be it video editors like Adobe After Effects, 3DS Max, or a video game, then you need to double the wattage of whatever your GPU says is the recommended amount to power your entire PC. This is a common sense approach as it ensures you have enough room to run any application, and its also a future proofing method in case you want to upgrade to an even higher end GPU. According to the A+ course I took, your true recommended wattage is more like 1100 watts, meaning you shouldn't settle for anything less than 1,000 watts with your particular GPU. The gold rating isn't going to do anything for you if the wattage isn't there.

So what am I supposed to do now?
 

Nemesia

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Whenever an application keeps freezing and crashing, usually the first culprit is the power supply, and that's exactly what I am finding to be the problem just from looking at its wattage. Whatever company built your PC for you should have asked you what kind of applications are you intending to run it on. If you are just using it to run less demanding applications like Microsoft Office, then a 550W PSU would be just fine. But if you are running any type of application that involves rendering scenes, be it video editors like Adobe After Effects, 3DS Max, or a video game, then you need to double the wattage of whatever your GPU says is the recommended amount to power your entire PC. This is a common sense approach as it ensures you have enough room to run any application, and its also a future proofing method in case you want to upgrade to an even higher end GPU. According to the A+ course I took, your true recommended wattage is more like 1100 watts, meaning you shouldn't settle for anything less than 1,000 watts with your particular GPU. The gold rating isn't going to do anything for you if the wattage isn't there.

So let me get this straight. You just recommended that someone with a RX 590 buys a 1000+ Watt PSU? Please stop recommending PSU to people. There is no such thing as getting double the Watts that your GPU recommends. I cannot believe you said that. Every experienced PC Builder in this forum would tell you that document is pure garbage. If your GPU recommends a 500W. You get a good quality 550-600 PSU. You won't ever need a 1000W if you're not using 2 GPU in SLI.

I don't know what was that A+ course you took but you probably didn't understand something if you really believe what you just said.
 
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Dec 11, 2019
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So let me get this straight. You just recommended that someone with a RX 590 buys a 1000+ Watt PSU? Please stop recommending PSU to people. There is no such thing as getting double the Watts that your GPU recommends. I cannot believe you said that. Every experienced PC Builder in this forum would tell you that document is pure garbage. If your GPU recommends a 500W. You get a good quality 550-600 PSU. You won't ever need a 1000W if you're not using 2 GPU in SLI.

I don't know what was that A+ course you took but you probably didn't understand something if you really believe what you just said.
I was thinking the same thing. Everywhere I watched tech youtubers, not randoms, they always said its more than enough to get a 500-600 W psu for a system like this. But then what's the problem? I ran cinebench, it didn't crash.
 

Nemesia

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I was thinking the same thing. Everywhere I watched tech youtubers, not randoms, they always said its more than enough to get a 500-600 W psu for a system like this. But then what's the problem? I ran cinebench, it didn't crash.
That cooler master power supply is not really good. That's a tier C PSU in the PSU tier list.
Tier C - Recommended for entry level desktops, low profile HTPCs, Office desktops, preferably GPUs with no external PCI-e power connection.

Your problem could be your PSU. It could be the RAM. It could be overheating problems on the CPU or GPU. Please try memtest86+ to rule out the RAM as the problem. Give us your temperatures at idle and load.

I would def change that power supply for a good quality one. Can you call the company that built your PC? Do you have any warranty with them? Don't start changing stuff in the PC if you can get it repaired / changed from them.
 
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g-unit1111

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I was thinking the same thing. Everywhere I watched tech youtubers, not randoms, they always said its more than enough to get a 500-600 W psu for a system like this. But then what's the problem? I ran cinebench, it didn't crash.
Cinebench is just a synthetic benchmark application that tests how the CPU renders video applications, it's not a hard stress on the CPU itself. So of course they would recommend the 500W - 600W PSU without thinking about it, because that is the bare minimum needed to run a GPU like an RX-590.

But when you run games or other real world applications like rendering / editing apps, then that will put some real world stress on the CPU which will cause it to crash. And that's why your PSU is struggling to keep up with the system itslef. When you buy a PSU like that, always focus on quality, not necessarily the quantity. That PSU is likely causing the problems your system is having. A GPU like an RX 590 needs a steady, constant stream of power delivered to it in order to function properly. Inadequate power can and most likely will cause inadvertent shut downs.
 
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Nemesia

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Cinebench is just a synthetic benchmark application that tests how the CPU renders video applications, it's not a hard stress on the CPU itself. So of course they would recommend the 500W - 600W PSU without thinking about it, because that is the bare minimum needed to run a GPU like an RX-590.

But when you run games or other real world applications like rendering / editing apps, then that will put some real world stress on the CPU which will cause it to crash. And that's why your PSU is struggling to keep up with the system itslef. When you buy a PSU like that, always focus on quality, not necessarily the quantity. That PSU is likely causing the problems your system is having. A GPU like an RX 590 needs a steady, constant stream of power delivered to it in order to function properly. Inadequate power can and most likely will cause inadvertent shut downs.
Considering that PSU is not really good it's probably that.
 
Dec 9, 2019
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First, install new drivers for gpu, update bios and get new chipset drivers ( all toutorials on youtube )
Next stop all overclocks if you are doing any.
Lastly if neither of those work try finding a program that it always crashes on.. Try runing something demanding and as you are doing that look into task manager if either cpu or ram are using all resources also check the pemps of both cpu and gpu while that is happening. You can narrow down the problem to a specific component.
 
Reactions: Teemsan
Dec 11, 2019
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First, install new drivers for gpu, update bios and get new chipset drivers ( all toutorials on youtube )
Next stop all overclocks if you are doing any.
Lastly if neither of those work try finding a program that it always crashes on.. Try runing something demanding and as you are doing that look into task manager if either cpu or ram are using all resources also check the pemps of both cpu and gpu while that is happening. You can narrow down the problem to a specific component.
All of the drivers are new, and fresh. Im not overclocking anything.
 

Dcopymope

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So let me get this straight. You just recommended that someone with a RX 590 buys a 1000+ Watt PSU? Please stop recommending PSU to people. There is no such thing as getting double the Watts that your GPU recommends. I cannot believe you said that. Every experienced PC Builder in this forum would tell you that document is pure garbage. If your GPU recommends a 500W. You get a good quality 550-600 PSU. You won't ever need a 1000W if you're not using 2 GPU in SLI.

I don't know what was that A+ course you took but you probably didn't understand something if you really believe what you just said.
That document came from the book my school used for the A+ certification course, meaning its written by actual I.T professionals, people who actually know what the hell they are talking about. I don't care what every so called experienced PC builder claims is "enough". I'm going by what I was taught by instructors with loads more industry experience than anyone on sites like this. And god help you if you use YouTube as a primary source of information. You all keep telling people to go by what is allegedly "enough" to run a video game, and yet they keep coming back with the exact same damn complaint, and in almost every case, its the same issue I see with the power supply.

So what am I supposed to do now?
Assuming your PSU is the issue, I would start by simply getting a better one. By my own experience with games randomly crashed and freezing with my old 500 PSU, I'm willing to bet money that this is your issue. I haven't had this issue ever since I upgraded to a 1250 watt platinum PSU, and never mind the efficiency rating, because like I said, it ain't gonna matter if you aren't giving your components plenty of wattage to work with. You can run all the tests you wish and it will all come back clean. I don't know why all these people are telling you otherwise, and even the people that work in the service department will claim the same thing. Maybe its because of company policy to justify their existence, so that people keep coming back with issues that could have been easily avoided to begin with, or it could be based on what they were taught by whoever.
 
CoolerMaster's PSUs are pretty lousy, so that would be the first thing I suspect.

But, ignore the recommendation for an 1100+ watt PSU - that is outright insanity, and absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

You need a high quality PSU - not based on the advertised wattage, not based on bronze/gold/etc 80+ efficiency certification, because lousy PSUs can have that, but based on known quality build and components.

With a good PSU, 550W would be sufficient, and 650W would give you extra headroom. - even with occasional power draw spikes from the graphics card, I don't think your system would EVER exceed 500W draw, and that would only be very brief spikes - I think running everything flat out at 100% utilization would probably draw no more than 450W... and generally, you don't want your draw to be more than approximately 80% of total capacity... so, by that math, you'd need a 562.5 Watt (quality) PSU. 550W is fine, but generally 650W PSUs don't go for much more, and, give you some headroom for upgrades. Sometimes the same brand/model of PSU is the same price, or even slightly cheaper, than their 550W counterpart.

See the first link in my sig for recommended vs avoid-at-all-costs PSUs. I can't say I approve of the builder's PSU choice.
 

Dcopymope

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CoolerMaster's PSUs are pretty lousy, so that would be the first thing I suspect.

But, ignore the recommendation for an 1100+ watt PSU - that is outright insanity, and absolutely HORRIBLE advice.

You need a high quality PSU - not based on the advertised wattage, not based on bronze/gold/etc 80+ efficiency certification, because lousy PSUs can have that, but based on known quality build and components.

With a good PSU, 550W would be sufficient, and 650W would give you extra headroom. - even with occasional power draw spikes from the graphics card, I don't think your system would EVER exceed 500W draw, and that would only be very brief spikes - I think running everything flat out at 100% utilization would probably be no more than 450W.
:rolleyes: "Horrible advice" according to what exactly? By what you claim is "sufficient" to run a demanding application? FOH


@Nemesia

Go by your own common sense. You don't need anything else to tell you to NOT settle for anything less than 1,000 watts. As cheap as 1,000 watt PSU's can be, you really have no excuse. Here, I'll help you in your search to get you started.

Link: CORSAIR RMx Series, RM1000x,
 
Yes, going by what I can do the math for in terms of component power draw, and the experience of numerous people on these forums, some of whom are experts in dealing with PSUs.

As opposed to, what? The CompTIA A+ Certification course? The "doubling" recommendation is a joke, and even THAT paragraph that you highlighted talks about allowing for adding components to the system. When the hell was that guideline even written? A decade ago? It doesn't even make mention of the amount of power rated vs the amount of power available on the 12V rail. Is it expecting, say, a second, high-powered video card to be added in the future?

CompTIA is, at best, baseline stuff - If what you posted is any indication, I wouldn't put much stock in it.


But even if we go with that joke of a guideline, let's look at this:
Rynen 2600 - 65W
RX 590 - 225W
MB, RAM, disks, etc - under 100W

So, 400 watts - which, by that guideline you're relying on, means get an 800W power supply.
 

Dcopymope

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Yes, going by what I can do the math for in terms of component power draw, and the experience of numerous people on these forums, some of whom are experts in dealing with PSUs.

As opposed to, what? The CompTIA A+ Certification course? The "doubling" recommendation is a joke, and even THAT paragraph that you highlighted talks about allowing for adding components to the system. When the hell was that guideline even written? A decade ago? It doesn't even make mention of the amount of power rated vs the amount of power available on the 12V rail. Is it expecting, say, a second, high-powered video card to be added in the future?

CompTIA is, at best, baseline stuff - If what you posted is any indication, I wouldn't put much stock in it.


But even if we go with that joke of a guideline, let's look at this:
Rynen 2600 - 65W
RX 590 - 225W
MB, RAM, disks, etc - under 100W

So, 400 watts - which, by that guideline you're relying on, means get an 800W power supply.
Its funny how you had to fudge the numbers for an RX 590 for it to make sense. Meanwhile, I keep it simple by basing it off what the manufacturer reccomends, which is 550 watts, not 225w, to power the entire PC and doubling it based on the simple rule of common sense. Doing what you people suggest is the very definition of insanity, since you are always expecting a different result. What is reccomended on the box is really the minimum you need to run simple applications, not the true reccomended wattage to run a video game that is anything but simple.
 
Its funny how you had to fudge the numbers for an RX 590 for it to make sense. Meanwhile, I keep it simple by basing it off what the manufacturer reccomends, which is 550 watts, not 225w, to power the entire PC and doubling it based on the simple rule of common sense. Doing what you people suggest is the very definition of insanity, since you are always expecting a different result. What is reccomended on the box is really the minimum you need to run simple applications, not the true reccomended wattage to run a video game that is anything but simple.
You're the one who's doing the fudging, here.

The manufacturer recommends a 550W PSU with that card because they have no idea if the user is running an Athlon 200GE, or an overclocked Intel 9900KS. They don't know how many drives, expansion cards, etc., the user may have, etc. Therefore, they play it safe, shooting a bit high to account for most of the possible situations for any given user. By your own logic, the manufacturer's estimate is wrong.

The 225W number is the TDP of an RX 590.


Stop fighting for the "right" to give terrible advice, based on a single, very basic certification that, frankly, is of questionable use, judging by that minimalist paragraph you're using as a reference.
 

Dcopymope

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You're the one who's doing the fudging, here.

The manufacturer recommends a 550W PSU with that card because they have no idea if the user is running an Athlon 200GE, or an overclocked Intel 9900KS. They don't know how many drives, expansion cards, etc., the user may have, etc. Therefore, they play it safe, shooting a bit high to account for most of the possible situations for any given user. By your own logic, the manufacturer's estimate is wrong.

The 225W number is the TDP of an RX 590.


Stop insisting on giving terrible advice, based on a single, very basic certification that, frankly, is of questionable use.
Yeah I know about the TDP, never cared for it. I go solely by what is claimed to be the "recommended" wattage to power the computer because that's all that matters in the end. Based on your explanation, just gives one all the more reason to double the wattage. The situation they clearly don't account for is the application the user intends to run. That's what matters the most more than anything you mentioned. And the A+ certification is one of the most sought after in the field. Its what employers often look for, so quite frankly, it is obviously very useful.
 

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