Strange Computer Problem - Could it be an Electricity Problem?

breadslapper

Commendable
Jun 12, 2016
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Hello everyone. I have a REALLY strange computer problem. So let me explain.

I have recently bought TWO new computers (specs below). Now the problem is, that when I turn on the UPS and press the computer switch, they just do not work as if there is no power or something, but the UPS has power. It gets stranger. I tried to diagnose the problem and here is what I did/found.

DIAGNOSING PROBLEM STEPS

1. At first I thought it was the power supply so I switched it with a brand new computer (since I bought two), and same result.
2. I eliminated the UPS and plugged the computer power supply directly. Still the same problem.
3. So then I just plugged the plug in another outlet and it worked. The computer switched on and stayed on without any problem.

The next day, I went to switch on the computer and the same thing happened again. I switched the outlet and worked. This has been happening most of each day (when I turn the computer on in the morning). But now, one of the computers is not turning on (changed outlet and everything). Some time one computer does it, and other times the other computer does it. There is no pattern.

Yesterday I plugged in another computer in another room and it worked just fine. This morning, the same thing happened to that computer. I don't know what to think. Maybe there is some kind of computer ghost.

Any suggestions? I'm thinking its a power problem (electricity). An if its an electricity problem, how would I go about to solve the issue? Any suggestions on that?

SPECS

Intel Processor i5 4460
Asrock Z97 Pro3
Nvidia GTX 960 4GB DDR5
NOX HUMMER PSU 750W
16GB DDR3 RAM
 
The high efficiency power supplies are more sensitive to power. If you plug them into a UPS, it needs to be a UPS with sinusoidal output for them to work properly.

That the computer is sometimes not working when plugged directly into the wall outlet does suggest a power problem. Unfortunately, most UPSes simply pass-through electricity unless there's a power failure. So the sinusoidal output UPS won't help when you have power, only when there's a power failure.

I would take the computers to a different location (not in the same neighborhood) and test them there. If they don't work there as well, then the problem is probably in the computer. If they work fine, then yeah you've most likely got a power problem. You can do a little investigation of your building's power with a multimeter, but any thorough investigation and repair will have to be done by a licensed electrician. AC power is a lot more complicated than DC power, so your ability to diagnose problems with just a multimeter is severely limited.
 
The high efficiency power supplies are more sensitive to power. If you plug them into a UPS, it needs to be a UPS with sinusoidal output for them to work properly.

That the computer is sometimes not working when plugged directly into the wall outlet does suggest a power problem. Unfortunately, most UPSes simply pass-through electricity unless there's a power failure. So the sinusoidal output UPS won't help when you have power, only when there's a power failure.

I would take the computers to a different location (not in the same neighborhood) and test them there. If they don't work there as well, then the problem is probably in the computer. If they work fine, then yeah you've most likely got a power problem. You can do a little investigation of your building's power with a multimeter, but any thorough investigation and repair will have to be done by a licensed electrician. AC power is a lot more complicated than DC power, so your ability to diagnose problems with just a multimeter is severely limited.
 

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