Suggestion for new SSD

sydneyblue203

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I have 2 Sandisk 256 both have errors one i cant even use anymore. I had a HyperX savage that one i suspect was not working from when i got it. Would a M.2 drive be better for gaming than lets say a Samsung Evo ?
 

Rogue Leader

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You would notice a minor difference in load times, it would be negligible.
 

Flyfisherman

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Ok. Only one come to my mind then: MyDigitalSSD BPX 80mm (2280) M.2 PCIe Gen3 x4 NVMe SSD
http://mydigitalssd.com/pcie-m2-ngff-ssd.php
5 Year Limited Warranty
I have one myself 480GB and it is just outstanding, even faster than my Samsung 850 Pro.

Tom's actually have a test of this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/mydigitalssd-bpx-nvme-ssd,4780.html
Read the review and be amazed.
Quality along with its performance... and very seldom You will find a SSD with 5-years warranty, with its performance at this price tag.

Best regards, from Sweden
 
This is the never ending argument. If we take the position that differences don't matter, then what about getting an SSD at all. How may things that you do on a daily basis that you would notice the difference if not 'staring at the screen looking for it" ?

Typical tasks to show superiority generally include:

- Moving 500 GB of files ... ever done that on a daily basis ?
- Running MS office script that includes 123 things in a script... but when you do them, don't you have to make a keystroke between each one ? So you are the bottleneck.

Its kinda like saying you need the new $120k Porsche to get to work on time ... but if ya clock the time in the Porsche and the time in the jetta, with 55 mph speed limits and rush hour traffic, you are not getting to work any faster to the extent that it matters.

SSD Boot time = 15.6 seconds
SSHD Boot Time = 16.5 seconds
HD Boot Time = 21.2 seconds

You gonna accomplish anything in 0.9 seconds ? We tested 5 users on a desktop and a laptop for 6 weeks, switching what drive the machine booted off each morning. The were told the computer's been acting funny, let me know if ya notice anything. On only one occasion over 30 work days did anyone report "the machine seemed slow to boot today" .

We use M.2 960s ... is it resulting in any productivity increases ? Well for example, i come in turn on my PC and make coffee... either way, by time I get back to my desk, its in the same state no matter what I boot from. Outside rendering, video editing and other specialized intensive applications, it won't affect your life in any way. But if budget is there, fast us cool :)
 

Flyfisherman

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That was an interesting answer, but I beg to disagree.
If you have certain s/w and play games, the load-times is of the very different kind.

I personally don't care at all if Windows takes 20 sec. or 1 min. to load. As soon as Windows is loaded and up (bt.w. it is loaded from an Intel SSD 520 180GB) then how is it t working with applications?

For example: I have a Samsung 850 Pro 1TB (D:) where most of my programs are installed, including Adobe Photoshop, Premiere, etc. and on top of that I have 3-HDDs (E: F:K:) where I store the data (video, pictures, music). Plus my m2-SSD-drive 480GB (M:)

What impossible to write : in right-parenthesis without a dings?

Of course my SSDs make a big difference in the performance.
Now, I also play games once in a while, and I can tell: that a good performance SSD will make a difference compare to a bad one, which probably will not do much better than a HDD.

A hefty game today will have heavy load between cutscenes, thats is a fact.
A fast and reliable SSD in my opinion is the only way to go - after a good graphics card and CPU.

Best regards from Sweden
 

Rogue Leader

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I think the answers got a bit off of your question. You asked if an M.2 drive is better for gaming over a regular SSD. If you want to go by benchmarks, sure your games may load a TINY bit faster, but no its not better for gaming.

Only M.2 PCIe NVMe drives are faster, but for gaming, you'd almost never notice the difference over a regular SSD.
 

Flyfisherman

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You are right.

However TS question in the first thread was:
I have 2 Sandisk 256 both have errors one i cant even use anymore. I had a HyperX savage that one i suspect was not working from when i got it. Would a M.2 drive be better for gaming than lets say a Samsung Evo ?
Then I answered that MyDigitalSSD BPX 80mm (2280) M.2 PCIe Gen3 x4 NVMe SSD is better.
What I should have said: This SSD is better, more warranty and faster, and necessarily better in game performance than a Samsung EVO - which we all now is among the best. Well not as good as the Pro, in terms of warranty, but still 5-years for the BPX which is 2 years better than the EVO.
But I agree that a SSD of the better model (like Samsung 850x series 10- years warranty) doesn't really matter in speaking off load times in games- they are already faster than any SATA-port 6Gbit/s
Unless...
 


Actually you didn't disagree. Let's go back to the post.

"Outside rendering, video editing and other specialized intensive applications, it won't affect your life in any way."

Of course my SSDs make a big difference in the performance.
Now, I also play games once in a while, and I can tell: that a good performance SSD will make a difference compare to a bad one, which probably will not do much better than a HDD.
Then what's the explanation as to why in blind testing over 6 weeks on a desktop that boots from either, SSD, SSHD or HD .... no one... ever ... **noticed** a difference ? There's a big difference in having folks say sit and watch a movie scene and saying "watch this closely and see if you notice anything out of place". And those watching it might find the cameraman reflected in the car's side view mirror after a few rewatches. But 99.9% of the folks watching the movie never notice anything. Same thing

If you switch it up and launch the same game off different storage media each day, users will not generally notice any differences. We saw that on the 6 week desktop test, we say that on the 6 week laptop test. Played Witcher 3 off SSHD and SSD, no **observable" difference difference and i was aware of the switch.

The point is yes, if you use a stopwatch you can find differences. But people leading real lives don't notice those differences. No legal secretary ever typed an extra brief in a workday because she had an SSD. No gamer ever reached a further save point because they had an SSD.

Example:

A. I finish up some work, and am ready for some "me time". I launch game, log in and it takes 20 seconds for my character to be able to move when launched off my SSD.

B. I finish up some work, and am ready for some "me time". I launch game, log in and it takes 22 seconds for my character to be able to move when launched off my SSHD.

1. Monday, I launched the game and ran downstairs to grab "a cup a cawfee" ... took 1:25

2. Tuesday, I launched game, opened browser and pout the 3 web sites on browser tans w/ maps and other data I use while playing ... having finished a mission last night, I go about looking at the maps to where I remember next mission lead.

3. Wednesday, I launch the game and while it's loading, I take the wireless headphones off the wall , open the ear piece cover, take out the wireless dongle, plug it in, put earphones on my head, open discord, send a message to my mates and after 45 seconds I'm ready to play.

As in the analogy given it doesn't matter that my Porsche tops out at 185 mph ... because we are not on a test track with nothing to interfere in how fast the car reached the finish line. This is 'real life" where the user does not res[pond as fast as the machine is capable and which is why "in blind testing" where folks are going about their every day lives, no one notices.

When SSDs firt came out I was approached by a technical assistant to put an SSD in his machine because it "would make him more productive". I said "show me', which threw him off his game and asked how. Since his job was to hep me make infrastructure decisions by data collection, I said do a cost analysis. So ee did so.

His argument was that he would ave 15 seconds of boot time every day and gave me:

260 work days x 15 seconds x 3 years = 3.25 hours

Well... that didn't cut it cause "in real live" it's 230 work days because vacation, sick and holidays.
It also didn't cut it cause it's not 15 seconds, it's about a third of that (5.6 seconds)

So we talking 1.2 hours and at his pay rate and associated overhead $36 wasn't enough to pay for an SSD. Then he came back with savings in opening and closing AutoCAD files ... So we took my personal machine and opened up a really large ACAD file, one about 8 times as large as any we had on our server.

SSD took 38 seconds
SSHD took 38 seconds
HD took 38 seconds

But the more important thing was this .... when he arrived in the office, he'd take off his jacket and undertake one or more of the following:

a) walk over to coffee machine and make coffee
b) eat his b'fast picked up from the deli on his way in
c) Talk w/ "the girls" about the the radio host's "catch a cheater show" that they all listen to on way to work
d) Water cooler chatter

When I arrive, I start the PC and then spend 10-20 minutes returning phone calls, checking my inbox.

So how fast the machine boots, in real life" is really of no consequence. You can use that time staring at the screen or using a stopwatch to reaffirm how fast your SSD is, or you can utilize that time to do something productive. I can stare at the screen and marvel that my game loaded 2 seconds faster or I can get my web sites loaded, my headphones on, and be actually ready to play by the time the game loads.

On top of that ... most folks don't have 2 TB of SSD space and if the game isn't on it, then you are not realizing any benefit from having one. So if like most, you have that 250 GB SSD, you can only fit 232 GB of files. Leaving the recommended free space, you're under 200 GB. Windows and applications are going to eat 100 - 150 GB, leaving 50 to 100 GB of game space. GTAV eats 95 GB ... Witcher 3 eats 40 GB. So with the typical user's game library, not that much actually gets to take advantage of that SSD.

I have been playing a game for some years now and it is self contained ... requires no install. All the files exist in the game folder, no files in windows and no entries in user directory or registry entries. So I can basically copy / paste the game folder on any storage device, double click and launch the game. The time it takes to get to the point where I can move my character if the same on any device because the handshaking with server takes longer than loading the game files.

I played Witcher 3 twice w/ different character builds ... I have two accounts on my desktop, one install was on SSD by user "jack" and other with user JackN on SSHD. There was no noticeable difference on either toon. Even if doing video editing ... with Windows and applications on a 250 GB SSD, you really need that 2nd SSD for a scratch drive if you want to speed that up. As we saw with AutoCAD there is no advantage, but if I was rendering, i certainly would have that 2nd SSD for that purpose because then I could realize a actual increase in productivity

In short, the same drive to work analogy applies ... no one would argue that my SUV is capable of driving 30 miles as fast as my old Porsche, but, because of other factors, no matter which I drive, I get to work at the same time. Traffic and speed limits get in the way of realizing the Porsche's advantage, real life gets in the way of the SSD.

 

Flyfisherman

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Ha, You are right, part, what I did disagree about was that when I first read (to fast) Your comment on testing of how fast different SSD are in startup-time, then I thought: Ok so that is the important factor - 180degr. from my point of view.

Well I see now after I reread your post that I can say: Yes I apologize sir.
Best regards from Sweden :)


 
M.2 is a size format.
It comes in sata and nvme flavors.
The nvme has faster sequential performance, depending on the connection, X2 vs X4.
Really though, the benefit of a ssd comes from low latency and fast small random I/O.
A Nvme ssd will rip through a virus scan noticeably faster.

You have had bad luck in reliability from several bargain ssd devices.

Today, I think Samsung is tops in that regard, and perhaps a touch faster too.
It is one of the few that offers a 5 year warranty.

You will find that a 500gb replacement will be a bit faster than 2 250gb devices and the space will be easier to manage.

The Samsung PRO devices may not be worth it. They offer longer endurance, but for normal desktop operations with an EVO you will never run out of updates. More so with larger devices.
 

Rogue Leader

Titan
Moderator


Take a look at the original post. How in the world does this college term paper help anybody?

This is your warning. Please stick to answering the questions asked by the user, and avoid taking threads off on a tangent that helps no one at all. Other peoples questions are not your forum for selling folks on whatever it is you're trying to convince them of in that wall of text.
 

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