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I am planning a system overhaul. Does it count as the same system if the only thing not swapped from my original setup is the motherboard? Thanks, AM4 backward compatibility.

I may try a rpi screen. I think a pi zero w should be enough to run a small LCD like that and its only $10
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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I am planning a system overhaul. Does it count as the same system if the only thing not swapped from my original setup is the motherboard? Thanks, AM4 backward compatibility.

I may try a rpi screen. I think a pi zero w should be enough to run a small LCD like that and its only $10
"same system" for Windows licensing considerations?
'Probably' is the same. Beyond the motherboard, there are "some number" of parts or IDs that would need to be changed for it to present as a "new PC".

If keeping the same motherboard, you're probably OK.
 

snakej

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Jul 18, 2008
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Put this together recently.
AMD Ryzen 3600 @ 4.2ghz 1.4v W/ temps of 47-77 cooled by NZXT X52 Kraken
16gb GSkill Aegis DDR4 3000 running@ 3200mhz
Asrock B550 phantom gaming 4
Gigabyte GTX 1070 G1
Ocz 750 ssd 120gb
Western digital black 750gb
Evga 750 watt
Lian li 205 tempered glass
Pretty happy with the performance and value.



 

Saga Lout

Olde English
Moderator
I've been running onesuch for over four years in spite all the naysayers. It's on in my office from seven in the morning to nine at night seven days a week.

On the other hand, records show that two spinnies were worn out over a similar period before I got the OCZ.

Even better, I got it free - thanks Tom's. The Forum sent another Mod and me to a lunch freebie on WD.
 
Jul 14, 2020
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First time poster here, and I thought I'd share my new developing build.

I built my first PC back in 2007. I think it was i7 something. It was not great but did its job for supporting triple monitors for iRacing back then. Fast forward to 2020, that PC has not seen the light of the day in more than five years, and while I had extra time while stuck at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, I wanted to try to build a new gaming PC.

So, I put together the following build, which went relatively smoothly all things considered.

  1. CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 4.2Ghz
  2. GPU: Gigabyte RTX2070 Super
  3. PSU: Corsair RM850x
  4. MB: MSI MPG X570 Gaming PRO Carbon Wifi
  5. RAM: G. Skill Trident Z Neo 16GB 3600
  6. Case: NZXT H510 Elite
  7. Drive: WD Blue 250GB M.2
  8. Samsung 860 EVO 1TB M.2
  9. Cooling: Corsair H115i AIO
  10. Case fans: 140mm x 2 intake
  11. 120mm x 2 exhaust
I was content with the build for a short time. I was not satisfied with the GPU temps, so I upgraded to NZXT Kraken G12 and Corsair 120mm AIO. I then realize that Corsair updated their pump, so it was no longer compatible with the G12. So I ended up getting a third AIO, EVGA unit.

I kept watching Youtube videos on PC builds and wanted more performance. So, I may have lost some self-control and decided on the following upgrades:

  1. CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 3950x (4.2Ghz all core)
  2. GPU: RTX 2080 Ti FE (no OC)
  3. RAM: G Skill Trident Z Neo 32GB 3600
  4. Cooling: Corsair Hydro X XC7 CPU Water Block
  5. Corsair Hydro X XG7 GPU Water Block
  6. Corsair Hydro X XD3 Pump/Reservoir
  7. Corsair Hydro X XR5 280mm Radiator
  8. XSPC EX120 120mm Radiator
  9. Corsair fittings
  10. Soft tube
I was happy with the performance but temps of the system concerned me. CPU temps reaching low 70s C with water temp in the high 40s *C. So I decided that a modular external cooling solution was needed, so I ended up with a Thermaltake 480mm thick radiator and 400mm cylindrical reservoir. The external unit is connected to the system with quick disconnect fitting so it can be detached and the system run with only internal cooling. The CPU temps barely break 60C under hours of gaming, GPU temps are stable at around 10C cooler than the CPU. Water temps also hover around 40C under gaming load.

So all in all, I am very happy with the system I ended up with despite the fact that I overspent beyond any budget I initially planned on and have enough core parts left over to build another system.





 
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Jul 14, 2020
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Not that, but how you made use of the H510's space for a custom loop. Had me crying tears of joy...
It's a good case, but misunderstood. Many of the H500 builds just tend to do it backwards.
Thanks for the kind words. I really liked the case when i first saw a build on Youtube. I think it was Optimum Tech and he did a custom loop in the case which looked amazing. I just wish NZXT came out with a mesh option for the front of the case. I think intake flow really suffers from having only vents at the bottom and one side.
 
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Phaaze88

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Thanks for the kind words. I really liked the case when i first saw a build on Youtube. I think it was Optimum Tech and he did a custom loop in the case which looked amazing. I just wish NZXT came out with a mesh option for the front of the case. I think intake flow really suffers from having only vents at the bottom and one side.
It was intended with a negative pressure fan setup in mind - if only air cooling. With liquid cooling in play, this doesn't matter as much, relying more on the thermal capability of the liquid.
That, and some people don't realize that liquid cooling is just a hybrid of air.
 

TK31

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Hi Guys

Made an account years and years ago but never really posted so i thought i'd get into it.

Built this recently because I'm home a lot more often, as I'm sure most are, and decided to go "all out" as much as I can, as I usually built mid-range systems in the past.

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
GPU: Asus RTX 2070 Super Turbo Evo 8GB
MB: Gigabyte Aorus Elite B450M
RAM: Kingston HyperX DDR4 16GB 3200
Case: CoolerMaster Q300P
SSD: WD Blue 500GB M.2 Nvme
Cooling: DeepCool Gammaxx GT
PSU: Antec EA650G 650W
Coolermaster MasterFan 120R x 6 (4 intake 2 exhaust)




Bought a micro ATX case because its easy to carry if I have to.

Had a good go at trying to figure out case airflow, but whether it is effective or not, can't really tell from the temps.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I only see one exhaust, which makes it an even bigger problem. Those two top fans should be exhaust, not intake, and in truth, although I know it sort of puts a damper on your aesthetic, it would probably cool better WITHOUT the top-front fan "stealing" airflow from the intake stream that is trying to go to the CPU cooler but is getting sucked directly back out the top instead of flowing from the front top fan to the CPU cooler and is instead going directly from the front top fan directly to the top front fan, and out the case, without doing anything at all other than making noise, and MAYBE cooling down a drive or two if they are in the air path.
 

TK31

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I only see one exhaust, which makes it an even bigger problem. Those two top fans should be exhaust, not intake, and in truth, although I know it sort of puts a damper on your aesthetic, it would probably cool better WITHOUT the top-front fan "stealing" airflow from the intake stream that is trying to go to the CPU cooler but is getting sucked directly back out the top instead of flowing from the front top fan to the CPU cooler and is instead going directly from the front top fan directly to the top front fan, and out the case, without doing anything at all other than making noise, and MAYBE cooling down a drive or two if they are in the air path.
There's one fan firing downwards at the bottom behind the PSU, which isnt plugged into lighting, so it isnt visible. Though, good pointers for sure. Would consider removing the top fans 100%.

@TK31
That is a problem. There's 4 intakes and 2 exhausts and I can't really see where this chassis draws in air from..?
Theres inlets at the top and bottom of the front perspex windows front and top. The case actually has pretty shocking airflow. But i guess i mainly got it for the size and aesthetics

 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
I only see one exhaust
Look at the first image again. It's pretty hard to see, but that's the psu fan facing upwards.

Theres inlets at the top and bottom of the front perspex windows front and top. The case actually has pretty shocking airflow. But i guess i mainly got it for the size and aesthetics
Wow, that's small... but if you say thermals are fine, I'll take your word for it.
Thermal concerns aside, it still looks nice.
 

TK31

Distinguished
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There's one fan firing downwards at the bottom behind the PSU, which isnt plugged into lighting, so it isnt visible. Though, good pointers for sure. Would consider removing the top fans 100%.



Theres inlets at the top and bottom of the front perspex windows front and top. The case actually has pretty shocking airflow. But i guess i mainly got it for the size and aesthetics

Yeah its around 37 degrees idle and 73 running Prime95 in the current setup
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Look at the first image again. It's pretty hard to see, but that's the psu fan facing upwards.
And that is 100% wrong, unless that case has no PSU intake grill in the bottom of it and can't have the intake fan faced down. There is NO configuration where having the power supply intake fan facing into the case is desirable unless it's a top mounted power supply or a case that has no PSU fan grill in the bottom, and I'm not aware of any cases for a long time that were bottom mounted PSU designs and didn't have an intake vent there.
 

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
And that is 100% wrong, unless that case has no PSU intake grill in the bottom of it and can't have the intake fan faced down. There is NO configuration where having the power supply intake fan facing into the case is desirable unless it's a top mounted power supply or a case that has no PSU fan grill in the bottom, and I'm not aware of any cases for a long time that were bottom mounted PSU designs and didn't have an intake vent there.
Remember I have my Seasonic Prime that way. Seasonic specifically tells you to run it in this fashion if you use the PSU in hybrid mode, as it allows the heat to naturally release upwards when the fan is not running.
 

Phaaze88

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Remember I have my Seasonic Prime that way. Seasonic specifically tells you to run it in this fashion if you use the PSU in hybrid mode, as it allows the heat to naturally release upwards when the fan is not running.
:homer:
I TOTALLY forgot about that! And not that long ago I found out that my psu has it's switch for Hybrid and Always On modes operating in reverse...
 

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