[SOLVED] Too scared to build my own PC!

ProPlayerGR

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Aug 7, 2016
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Hey guys. I bought a ryzen 5 2600, a b450 tomahawk and 16gb corsair ram 3000mhz and I was thinking to take my pc to a local pc shop, but they want 60 euros and I thought that it isn't worth it. However I'm too scared to build it on my own! I need some courage. I have found a youtube video, where he uses the same parts as me(only the cpu and motherboard but a similar psu as well). Here is the video:
View: https://youtu.be/mLG8U0vejfE?list=WL

The video is very good, he explains everything perfectly, but I still don't know what to do! This my first time building a pc. The problem is that right now I have an fx 9370 and I have to unplug everything, remove them from the case and place the new components. I need to ask something. I have two disks. One hdd and one ssd. I have windows 10 installed on the ssd right now. Once I put everything together, do I need to boot windows from a flash drive, format my drives and then install them again on my ssd? If so do I install windows 10 on the flash drive as in the video and then I boot windows from the drive and press that format option? Or is it not necessary to format?(Skip to 17:21 in the video, I'm talking about that format option). I've heard that a format is required when you change hardware. That's why I'm scared. Placing the parts in the case is easy and connecting the cables. But when I open my pc is the problem. What I need is courage and some instructions on how to format my drives/perform a fresh windows installation. Thanks in advance and sorry if my thread is complicated.
 
Jul 26, 2019
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I've watched my family build PCs for over 15 years. I've had my hand in 4 builds and have done two end to end by myself. Honestly everytime I go to build I still get nervous. I still wonder did I get the right parts? am I going to short something? Will something get overloaded after I get started?

Even after all these years I still make mistakes. This last build I had was a roller coaster. Trying to mix and match parts. Ended up going from simply adding parts to an existing build I had, to starting an entirely new one! And I still get frustated getting parts in and the wires just right!

I say go for it, ensure you read the instructions, use tools like PCPartPicker & you can of course consult all the lovely people here Toms Hardware!

You may run into an issue, it maybe a simple fix it may not! Regardless chances are someone else has experienced it before and can help guide you on next steps.

PC building isn't rocket science, but there can be a lot to take in. At the end I promise you will learn a lot and once its done its brings a great sense of accomplishment.

If you take your time, do your research and ask questions you should have little to no problems.
 

sdedu77

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Dec 9, 2018
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First of all, to be absolutely sure you don't fry your components (although this is unlikely if you don't do the moonwalk on the carpet with socks on before), simply touch an unpainted metal part of your case. Touch from time to time to remove any built-up static.
Back up your data before clean installing Windows!
After you put everything together, plug the stick while the computer is still off. Turn on the computer and enter in the BIOS (UEFI in this case) and make sure the usb boot drive is above your SSD; usually it should be like that by default, but it's good to check.
Once you get to the partition window, delete your partition(s) and format the unallocated space. After selecting that partition, it might appear another one (System Reserved or something like that). After this point it should get pretty intuitive.
 

ProPlayerGR

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Aug 7, 2016
440
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First of all, to be absolutely sure you don't fry your components (although this is unlikely if you don't do the moonwalk on the carpet with socks on before), simply touch an unpainted metal part of your case. Touch from time to time to remove any built-up static.
Back up your data before clean installing Windows!
After you put everything together, plug the stick while the computer is still off. Turn on the computer and enter in the BIOS (UEFI in this case) and make sure the usb boot drive is above your SSD; usually it should be like that by default, but it's good to check.
Once you get to the partition window, delete your partition(s) and format the unallocated space. After selecting that partition, it might appear another one (System Reserved or something like that). After this point it should get pretty intuitive.
When you say the partition window, you mean that window that opens at 17:21 in the video? And when you say delete the partitions what do you mean. Just selecting my two disks and pressing the format option isn't enough?
 

RLarcosPES2

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Oct 10, 2014
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It will run fine at first. But I recommend backing up the data you need from the ssd to the hdd. Then take off the hdd and install Windows to avoid partition management altogether.

Θα σου μίλαγα ελληνικά αλλά δεν επιτρέπεται.
 

ProPlayerGR

Reputable
Aug 7, 2016
440
7
4,795
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It will run fine at first. But I recommend backing up the data you need from the ssd to the hdd. Then take off the hdd and install Windows to avoid partition management altogether.

Θα σου μίλαγα ελληνικά αλλά δεν επιτρέπεται.
I don't need anything, I want to delete everything. Why should I remove the hdd? I don't think it'll be a problem.
 
Jul 26, 2019
78
9
45
1
I've watched my family build PCs for over 15 years. I've had my hand in 4 builds and have done two end to end by myself. Honestly everytime I go to build I still get nervous. I still wonder did I get the right parts? am I going to short something? Will something get overloaded after I get started?

Even after all these years I still make mistakes. This last build I had was a roller coaster. Trying to mix and match parts. Ended up going from simply adding parts to an existing build I had, to starting an entirely new one! And I still get frustated getting parts in and the wires just right!

I say go for it, ensure you read the instructions, use tools like PCPartPicker & you can of course consult all the lovely people here Toms Hardware!

You may run into an issue, it maybe a simple fix it may not! Regardless chances are someone else has experienced it before and can help guide you on next steps.

PC building isn't rocket science, but there can be a lot to take in. At the end I promise you will learn a lot and once its done its brings a great sense of accomplishment.

If you take your time, do your research and ask questions you should have little to no problems.
 
I don't need anything, I want to delete everything. Why should I remove the hdd? I don't think it'll be a problem.
From what I understand, even if you install Windows 10 on the SSD, if the HDD is installed (edit: if the HDD is connected WHILE Windows is being installed), Windows has some kind of expectation that it MUST be there. So if you ever remove the HDD later, you'll encounter problems.

I don't know how much accuracy there is to that, but when I upgraded to an SSD, I didn't take chances. I disconnected my HDD, installed and connected only the SSD, then installed Windows. After the install was completed and I booted up and logged in for the first time, then I shut down, and reconnected the hard drive.
 
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