Useful SSD Articles - Part 2

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Jasmine23

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I found this information truly valuable and helpful in this topic. Thanks a lot for sharing.
 

chargeit

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Yea, I wouldn't do most of this. It's what's called snake oil... I'd look into disabling windows back ups, and changing virtual ram to a different drive, but, most of this is paranoid bs that will cause you to mess your system up... Good luck with all the system issues you'll end up having over the next few months because this random guy on the internet knows better than the hardware manufacturers.

Find out what your SSD manufacture suggests disabling, and do it.

*I love guides that suggest doing things such as altering reg... The hell? If you won't remember that you did this later, don't do it now.

**Windows automatically enables trim when it detects a SSD. Windows won't attempt to defrag a SSD.

**Set up your downloads to use a 2nd drive, set up your videos, music, and things like that to use a 2nd drive.

**Watch out for disabling, or rerouting things you don't understand. This can have very negative consequences in the long run.

**Get a program for managing your SSD, such as Samsung Magic, which is free, and works with any SSD from what I understand.

**Don't disable your windows logs... You'll need them later if something goes wrong.

**Don't disable indexing.

**Make sure you have AHCI enabled in bios.

I'm not sure how much extra life people think they'll get by saving a few kb here and there, but, it isn't worth it. Unless you're doing some major writing, which wont' be affected by things like freaking "LOGS", than your SSD should last long past its usefulness.
 

Isaiah4110

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Ummm... I beg to differ.

"Rerouting" the user profiles folder is ABSOLUTELY helpful for the vast majority of Windows users, basic users and gamers alike. When you consider the fact that the vast majority of SSDs in use are 128GB or less, and I'd be willing to guess that over 90% are under 256 GB, offloading the standard default storage locations to a mechanical disk is absolutely beneficial.


    If the SSD ever fails then all you lose is your OS and software installations.
    Most users are not going to take the time to keep their downloaded files out of the "Downloads" folder, their documents, pictures, music, videos, etc. out of their "My Documents/Pictures/Music/Videos" folders, and often times save things straight to the desktop. This type of behavior will very rapidly fill up a Solid State Drive.


This type of system modification does require the user enter "Audit Mode" and implement a "registry hack", but it will not damage any computer functionality for properly written programs.



I'm not exactly sure what instructions in this thread you are calling "snake oil elixir", but I absolutely recommend doing more than just ensuring your BIOS is set to AHCI storage mode. Note also that many of the articles in the OP are quite old, referencing SF1200 controllers and such. Thus this thread was originally made to account for people who were using anything from Windows XP to 7.
 

chargeit

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The tweaks for windows 7...

Windows will turn on TRIM with no input from the user.
Disabling system restore is a bad idea for most users.
Disabling drive indexing will do nothing but make it impossible to use your computers search function.
Windows won't attempt to defrag a SSD.
Fully disabling page filing is a bad idea, since there are programs which won't function correctly without it.

I simply see a bunch of information which will have the unsuspecting doing things to their system without realizing what they are doing.

Sure, don't store pictures, movies, and music on your SSD, don't hibernate it use sleep instead, and shrink down your Virtual ram, but, some of this is way too deep, and not easily reversed if you don't remember what you've done.

HOW TO SET UP YOUR SSD...

Buy a SSD
Install it
Make sure Sata is set to AHCI mode in bios
Run windows performance assessment (this will insure windows knows you've got a SSD installed now).
Download something like "Samsung Magic", use its suggested steps to improving your SSD life.
DON'T STORE LARGE FILES ON YOUR SSD IF YOU HAVE A HDD DATA DRIVE.

There you go, your ssd is now set up and ready to have a long, happy life, without you having to alter 50 obscure settings in windows.

 

Isaiah4110

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Again, I disagree.


  • Verifying that TRIM is enabled is a good idea. Maybe you don't have to turn it on, but it doesn't hurt to check.
    Disabling system restore I go back and forth on. In most cases I actually find it completely useless. I work as an IT professional and end up fixing computers for friends and family on the side, and I can't recall a single instance where System Restore either fixed or helped fix a PC.
    The purpose of indexing is to make searches faster. Turning it off doesn't prevent your computer from being able to search, and on a SSD it technically shouldn't make that big an impact. That said, I do agree that turning it off also should have a major benefit.
    Again, regardless of how Windows is supposed to behave, it never hurts to verify that defragging is disabled on your SSD. There is absolutely no harm that could come from manually disabling defragging.
    The programs that are hard-wired to check for a certain amount of page file space are few and far between. They are also usually older programs that are unlikely to still be in use. The is (again) no real harm in disabling the page file on the SSD (and doing so could be very beneficial in the long run) and enabling it on a secondary mechanical HDD.
How to set up your SSD in a desktop (especially in a new build):

    Build the computer w/ the SSD and HDD, ensuring BIOS is set to AHCI and not IDE or Legacy storage mode.
    Begin the Windows install on the SSD.
    On the screen that asks you to enter a PC name, press Ctrl+Shift+F3 to enter audit mode.
    Follow the procedure in one of the above articles to change the default location of the "Users" folder to the D: Drive (mechanical HDD).
    Reboot into the OoBE and finish the Windows install (name PC, create profile, etc.).
    Install drivers for all your hardware.
    Run the Windows Performance Assessment.
    Verify TRIM is on and defragging is off for the SSD
    Make your own decision regarding whether or not you will ever use System Restore (this actually CAN and often times DOES take up quite a bit of space)
    Disable page file on the SSD and enable it on the HDD or set page file to an incredibly small value on the SSD. NOTE: If you ever DO encounter one of those rare programs that refuses to run if it detect no page file running on the system drive then you can ALWAYS go back and re-enable page file on the SSD, this is incredibly simple and there is zero risk involved. Not a registry "hack".


Again, as I said before, most people will NOT take the time to change the save location for every single one of their files to a different drive. They will simply save to the Desktop, Music, Documents or Videos folder. In doing so, if they don't change the default location of the Users folder then they will absolutely fill up their SSD very quickly.

These are the most important things to do on a new PC build using Windows 7, 8 or 8.1. Many of the other "50 obscure settings" will apply to older PCs and SSDs but are becoming outdated and unnecessary changes now.
 

chargeit

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There is no harm in verifying that Trim is disabled.

I've never found system restore to be useful, but, I've also noticed that less experienced users tend to have problems which are easier to fix. It could be as simple as having the system remove a program, or roll back drivers.

I might of been a slightly mellow dramatic about the search indexing, but, I really don't see it saving much space.

Making sure your SSD isn't set to defrag wouldn't hurt.

Issues that come up because of page file being fully disabled might not seem large to you, or someone else that knows what it is, but, to a person less experienced, this could be a major headache that isn't so simple to fix. I've read that Photoshop for instance, won't start without Virtual ram. (I'm not sure if this is all versions, or just some.)

All of what was just mentioned above, will be handled by the program I suggested, "Samsung Magic". It gives you a nice list of things to check on, complete with shortcuts.

My issue with some of this is because users will follow these "how to guides", without knowing why, or what it is that they are really doing. Any time it is suggested to alter something at the registry level, I have to question what the writer was thinking. If you don't know to do something like that on your own, than you should leave it alone. Also, there are often less intrusive ways to go about doing the same thing.

I suggest that anyone following these guides makes sure to bookmark the pages, so that you can easily come back later and figure out what was changed.

 

nukemaster

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You both have your points. It is up to the end user to decide.

Personally I did nothing special in my one system and in 553 days it has only got a wear level count of 23. My files have always been on another drive so that helped and my browser and its cache are on a ramdrive(for speed more than anything else).

Everyone has a way they like to do things.

The reason for some recommending disabling page file and indexing is to lower overall writes(since SSD's can only do so many program erases) to the drive. I leave my page file at 4 gigabytes on all my systems with ssd's with no issues at all. Search indexing is up to you.
 

Isaiah4110

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Oh I would definitely second these recommendations. The worst situations, from an IT Support standpoint, that I have walked into are the ones in which the person had "a friend who knew computers" who came in and "fixed my computer and/or made it faster/better" and ones in which the person in general started messing around when they didn't fully understand what the results of their actions would be. I ALWAYS recommend that no one mess with ANYTHING on a computer unless they KNOW what it is they are doing. This is not something I would expect a grandma buying her first PC to try to attempt.

In my experience, if a person is confident enough to build their own PC (which is where I've targeted my recommendations) then they will/should have enough knowledge to understand page file, defrag, etc. settings.

I also absolutely recommend bookmarking this list if you use any of the recommendations contained herein in case you forget what you did to your PC. You have to be able to remember how to undo something in the off chance that something goes wrong and you have to fix it.

I only took issue with the idea that none of these recommendation are helpful and/or useful and should never be used.
 

chargeit

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Yea, I should of been clearer. It's not that everything is a bad idea, but, the fact that it should be filtered. Of course there is a lot useful information, and suggestions. The issue is, some people might not be able to distinguish between the two.

 

zenobialewis87

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Thanks alot sir! I have been searching for relevant information on SSD I think I got a lot of idea with this.
 

AlpineKid

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To das_stig(Viola) -- I tried this,

1. Once setup and at the desktop, don't bother doing any customization, but start up Computer Management via Control Panel, Administrative Tools, double click on Computer Management, click on Local Users and Groups.
Two items show, Users & Groups.
Click on Users, info shows up in right pane (there should be three items, Administrator, a User name and Guest).
I could not find anything like "\System and Security\".

2. Click on Administrator, click on Properties & box opens, unCheck "Account is disabled" and enable the account.
Click Apply & OK. Close all.

3. Reboot.

4. Logon as Administrator, no password. Go back into "User" account in Computer Management (see above) and delete the account name that was created during setup and any and all files. (I could not find any other files).
A User and Groups box opens with warning about each account has a unique identifier... Are you sure? then 2nd box opens because the "user" has Administrator rights.

5. Startup Regedit and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList
In Profile List there is a number of items. Look in each until the "Users" name is found. Right click on ProfileImagePath, click on Modify, change the drive letter & delete name.

6. Change the ProfilesDirectory from %SystemDrive%\Users to, for example, D:\Users. Do you have to put something about "Users" on the HD that you are going too?

7. Close down regedit and reboot.
*** Now screen is showing two boxes, one with flower picture & Administrator under it. The other is blank with Other user under it. Click on Administrator and I get "Your account has been disabled. Please see your system administrator, which is me. Click on Other user and two boxes open wanting User name and Password. I have entered different info and nothing works. Now I have a computer that is unusable.***

8. Logon as Administrator and create a user account with admin privileges.

9. Logoff and logon using new account and let system create profile, which is now on your D: drive which of course now the default location for all your personal files.

10. Start up Computer Management via Control Panel\System and Security\Administrative Tools.

11. Local Users and Groups\Users, select Administrator and disable the account. Leaving this enabled is a big security risk!!!

karenchimai had this problem. Do you know if it got fixed?
I am blocked in Step 9. When I logon to the new account, I have an error: "The User Profile Service service failed the logon".
And now, I change the D:\Users back to %SystemDrive%\User and it not works anymore.

To> > das_stig(Viola),
Did anybody get this to work?? If I remember right you said you used this all the time.
Can you fix the places that I went wrong? By the time you read this I will have re-installed to get computer back to square one.

Thank you
 

Alex32

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Hi, Have learn much and thanks for your sharing.

just happen to know a wonderful activity for portable native USB 3.0 SSD. Maybe useful to you as well.

they are giving away 256GB SSD drives to celebrate National Day of the PRC, see the link http://goo.gl/o9we1A
 

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