What is NTSC 45% and NTSC 94%

Status
Not open for further replies.

Kiril1512

Honorable
Jun 4, 2014
742
7
11,365
110
Hello!
I'm going to buy a new laptop for my work and bussines... I'm watching to two models now... and MSI and ASUS ROG model.

The diference betwen them is minimal so the only diference I see is the display.

MSI display: 15.6” Full HD (1920x1080), Anti-Glare, NTSC 94%, Wide View, TN
ASUS display: 15.6", Full HD 1920x1080, TN, LED Back-lit, Ultra Slim 200nits, 16:9, Anti-Glare, NTSC: 45%

Can someone tell me what is NTSC means? and what is better 94% or 45%? I don't know if more % is better or not...

Also there is other parameters that I need to see?

ps: direct links for laptops:
msi: https://www.pcdiga.com/2/20902/Portatil-MSI-GL62-6QF-1001XPT
asus: https://www.pcdiga.com/2/20828/Portatil-Asus-15-6-FZ50VX-56C95CS1
 
NTSC is one of several gamuts used to measure colour accuracy. Each gamut has a slight variance on the primary colours red, green and blue to suit different circumstances. NTSC is a gamut for television broadcasts and is not suitable for photography as its red, green and blue values differ from those used in digital cameras. In this instance, you want the sRGB or AdobeRGB gamut.

Eizo, who manufacture professional monitors, has a good article here; http://www.eizoglobal.com/library/basics/lcd_monitor_color_gamut/.
 

Jester Maroc

Honorable
Apr 30, 2013
1,129
0
11,960
242
The higher percentage is more accurate colour reproduction.

If you plan on working on photography etc then the higher NTSC would be best. Anything below 95% is actually not recommended for photography.

I would actually recommend getting an IPS display in that case.
 
NTSC is one of several gamuts used to measure colour accuracy. Each gamut has a slight variance on the primary colours red, green and blue to suit different circumstances. NTSC is a gamut for television broadcasts and is not suitable for photography as its red, green and blue values differ from those used in digital cameras. In this instance, you want the sRGB or AdobeRGB gamut.

Eizo, who manufacture professional monitors, has a good article here; http://www.eizoglobal.com/library/basics/lcd_monitor_color_gamut/.
 

Kiril1512

Honorable
Jun 4, 2014
742
7
11,365
110




I'm not work with any foto software, i will using this for programing and word / excell work... So for me there is no diference between the screen panel on both case right?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS