Question Anyone else slightly disappointed by the new Ryzen?

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reviews are out....

It seems the gaming expectations might have been a tad over exaggerated....most reviews I see show 9700K and 9900K very clearly and firmly still on top...(not worth their price premiums, however, and, each is now worth $70-$100 less almost instantly, IMO; an 8% performance premium certainly not worth 25% more, etc..)
 
I'm happy with the line up and how it stands. I still find the Ry3900X and Ry3950X hard sells for me (price and core count wise), but I'm sure they'll find plenty of enthusiasts that need them and can make good use of them without having extra PCIe nor memory channels.

The Ry3700X is the real sweety in the line up IMO. I'd even argue it eclipses the 3600(X) a bit, as it looks to be the best price/value.

Cheers!
 
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Dec 10, 2018
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I'm happy with it but they coulda completely fucked Intels cpus for few yrs by having 3600(x) as 8/16. But the 3700x is said to have then highest headroom for overclocking
 

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Titan
Moderator
For those of you that were "dissapointed by the new Ryzen", are you still post release? If so or if not why?
I was disappointed that AMD didn't push more aggressively as it could have to catch up with how far behind the price-performance gain curve we've fallen over the past 10 or so years. AMD knows Intel is kind of f'd for the better part of the next two years so we get to pay the price for lack of credible competition.
 
Yeah, how can there be a Zen 2+ when these Ryzen 3000s are already maxed out of the box?
Replacing the stock cooler with a high end one doesn't really do anything for performance, save for lower noise.
They'd be pulling an Intel at that point.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Isn't 3000 the last of the AM4 lineup?
Ryzen 4000(?) is going to be on AM5(?)
AMD is supposed to support AM4 until 2020, so there may be a 4th-gen on it. On the other hand, given the repeated issues with backward compatibility and how AMD had to make a significantly more complex substrate to maintain socket compatibility after the chiplet transition, I wouldn't be surprised if AMD decided to go AM5 to optimize the socket pin-out for chiplet-based designs which should allow substrate simplifications.

I'd personally prefer the clean slate approach.
 
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AMD knows Intel is kind of f'd for the better part of the next two years so we get to pay the price for lack of credible competition.
Supposedly Intel may be leaving Hyperthreading enabled for all of their "10th gen" Core processors and filling the i9 level with a 10-core model, and if that's the case, they will likely be back in the game around the end of the year. Power consumption and heat output will likely be relatively high with all threads loaded, and aftermarket coolers will probably be needed to get the most out of them, but that's not much different from their current lineup. Once Intel is matching the same number of cores and threads as AMD at relatively similar price points, their products should be a lot more competitive.

Yeah, how can there be a Zen 2+ when these Ryzen 3000s are already maxed out of the box?
Replacing the stock cooler with a high end one doesn't really do anything for performance, save for lower noise.
They'd be pulling an Intel at that point.
Zen+ was more than just raising the stock clocks on existing processors. What enabled those higher clocks was the move to an updated manufacturing node, and likewise we should see clock rates go at least a bit higher for the 4000-series processors as well. Zen+ also incorporated some changes that enabled improvements to memory latency, among other things, and similar changes will likely improve IPC a bit for the 4000-series as well. I doubt the 4000-series will provide as large a jump in performance as the 3000-series, but there should be room for some improvements.

As for AM4 support, I suspect next year's processors will likely continue to support existing motherboards, at least the 500 chipset boards. My best guess is that there will be new boards to support DDR5 in 2021, assuming that RAM is readily available at reasonable prices by then.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Supposedly Intel may be leaving Hyperthreading enabled for all of their "10th gen" Core processors and filling the i9 level with a 10-core model, and if that's the case, they will likely be back in the game around the end of the year.
I don't think I'd call being six cores behind, however many watts higher and quite likely still quite abit more expensive for a given amount of performance being "back in the game", more like narrowly avoiding obsolescence across the product stack.
 

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