Question Bad performance after PC wipe

mkolsen

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Sep 5, 2017
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So I most recently wiped my PC, because i started having stutters in all the games I played.

After I got my pc up n running again i installed my most played games first, wow, csgo and valorant.

Valorant worked without issues.
World of Warcraft worked without issues.
Csgo DIDNT

So when I join a csgo DM or match I start off by having a couple minutes with heavy stutters, unplayable ones... After 5 min tops they start to diminish, which means going from the bad ones to not so bad to almost gone within 10 minutes. So I have 15 minutes of gameplay that is really frustrating.

Not to mention I was at 200-350 fps before the reset of the PC, now i'm around 80-180..

To be fair before I go into the rant of things i have done, my PC is not running as good as it did before. It's overheating (fixed that) and its running lower FPS than before the reset

CPU: I7 7700K
GPU: 1080
MOBO: Z170
RAM: 16GB 3000mhz
Windows 10

I have updated all the drivers I know of, that can have influence on my computers performance.

I have removed every overlay from programs such as discord and xbox.

I have changed my powerplan to high performance.

I have reinstalled csgo multiple times.

I feel like i have done everything I could, but my CSGO is running so low FPS and annoying stutters yet, which is super annoying seeing as I have a 240hz monitor xd



I bet the fix is right in front of my eyes, but they are closed atm, can someone help me open them?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 

mkolsen

Reputable
Sep 5, 2017
27
0
4,530
0
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.


Graphics card driver CLEAN install guide using the Wagnard tools DDU



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
I will try all this, THANKS! Holy solutions
 

mkolsen

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Sep 5, 2017
27
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So I'm either really stupid, or else ASUS is the stupid ones, because finding drivers for my BIOS prooved impossible.

Z170 PRO GAMING mobo, no drivers to be found for BIOS.

Tried clean installs, did nothing
Activated my XMP profile, it did nothing and my memory was running as it should otherwise according to my BIOS information.

No luck so far :S still running CS like my computer was made of wood
 

mkolsen

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Sep 5, 2017
27
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what do you mean drivers for bios? they provide a BIOS version for your particular hardware. There are no drivers for it. Those are for Windows and such

the website is down for me right now
Oh, then I dont know what he meant by newest version of my bios. My BIOS-version is 2016 :eek:
 

mkolsen

Reputable
Sep 5, 2017
27
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if everything is working then the BIOS isn't the issue. You just need your motherboard and chipset drivers from them for Windows to install
Alright, another thing to cross off my list i guess :D I'm still wondering tho why my csgo is running so <Mod Edit> after the wipe of my pc and fresh windows install..

And yes, graphic drivers are updated
 
Last edited by a moderator:

mkolsen

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Sep 5, 2017
27
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So I added +mat_queue_mode 2 and cl_forcepreload 1 in my csgo launch options, it prolly increased my fps with 150-200, placing me on a solid 300 average FPS.

Now I'm wondering how I transfer those launch options to other games.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
if everything is working then the BIOS isn't the issue. You just need your motherboard and chipset drivers from them for Windows to install
Eh, I don't believe this to be entirely accurate. Certainly having the most up to date driver versions as indicated on the motherboard product page is important, but to say "if everything is working then the BIOS isn't the issue" is really not correct.

LOTS of systems "work" but have problems that are only resolved through a newer BIOS version that addresses those problems. ANY problem that happens on an otherwise working system can be down to something in the BIOS that either doesn't afford compatibility for something, or hampers performance or doesn't directly contain the necessary code to support the drivers that that piece of hardware requires because the BIOS version was created BEFORE that hardware ever existed and it needs something specific to correctly support it to be included in the CMOS instructions or microcode.

You can find your BIOS version by typing msinfo32.exe into the run or search box on the start menu and then looking next to 'BIOS version/date" on the System summary. Then compare that to what is available on the motherboard product page under BIOS releases.
 

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