Question Built a New Computer, Windows installer keeps crashing...

Sep 14, 2019
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I have recently build a new system and upon putting it together it posted. I was excited and powered it down inserted my USB stick I created with the Windows media creation tool. It loaded up no problem but after selecting my drive and starting the installer it completes the first step quickly and then crashes on "Getting files ready for installation" (around 13-16%). It generally flashes a BSOD for a split second that was too fast for my capture card to catch. I have tried using multiple USB sticks just in case and had no luck. I am pretty sure this is a hardware issue but I'm not sure exactly what part is causing my issues. I'm leaning on it being a RAM problem but I have tested multiple times in memtest86 and have come up with zero errors.

Here is a video of my problem that I recorded with my capture card.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niym-UMDOt4&feature=youtu.be


Build:
Ryzen 5 3600
Stock Wraith Stealth Cooler
ASRock B450M Steel Legend
MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z
Corsair Vengence RGB Pro 16GB 3000MHZ C15
Samsung 970 Pro NVME SSD
GIGABYTE P650B Power Supply
NZXT H500

PS: Please respond, I have had this sitting on my desk as a fancy looking brick for over a month and I am in a country where I cannot get my hands on PC parts without waiting 2 to 3 weeks for shipping.
 
Sep 14, 2019
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You need to create a ''New" partition at 1:34 before clicking "Next".
I have tried your suggestion, I am getting a little bit further in the prosses. I'm now getting to around 30 to 32% but it is still crashing. However, now the BSOD is staying up long enough to read it. I have retried is several times and have gotten 4 error codes.

IQRL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
DPC_WATCHDOG_VIOLATION
FAT_FILE_SYSTEM
APC_INDEX_MISMATCH
 
Sep 14, 2019
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First try formatting the flash drive to NTFS file system and recreate the media creation tool.
If that doesn't work, try a different flash drive.
I just tried this on two different flash drives. The first one continued to crash at around 30% and the second one made it to around 85% and produced this error "Kernel Auto Boost Lock Acquisition With Raised IRQL". The BSOD didn't stay up for long before my system hard rebooted itself.

Any further suggestions?
 
Sep 14, 2019
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Do you have another ssd/hdd available for testing? That'd be my next step. Just make sure data is backed up.
That was my first step, I thought my ssd was bad so I got a new one and the problem persisted, I originally had a Silicon Power 1TB sata ssd
 
Sep 14, 2019
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I have tried a few more time and have gotten a few more error codes,
MEMORY MANAGEMENT
KERNEL MODE HEAP CORRUPTION
KERNEL SECURITY CHECK FAILURE
ATTEMPTED TO WRITE READ ONLY MEMORY
 
Sep 14, 2019
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Did you ever find out the issue? I'm having this same exact problem with very similar hardware.
I have not to figure out the issue yet... I contacted ASRock about it and they said they would send me out a replacement motherboard. The problem with that is the fact that the online forum will not accept my DPO address because I am currently assigned overseas. I have contacted them about it but after going through multiple email exchanges the person I was talking to didn't seem to understand my problem and never responded to my last email. I thinking about just biting the bullet and ordering another motherboard, but I am worried that it could be another problem and I have already poured more money into this system then I should have.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You need to create a ''New" partition at 1:34 before clicking "Next".
No, you don't. If point of fact, you should NOT do that. You want to install to the UNALLOCATED, UNPARTITIONED, UNFORMATTED space, for future reference. Windows will create ALL necessary partitions and perform all necessary formatting, itself. Automatically. And it will do a better job than you will of determining exactly what types of partitions, file allocation tables and formatting needs to be done. It's kind of the whole point of doing a clean install, in some cases. It might also be a very real consideration as to whether you end up with a true UEFI installation or a hybrid UEFI legacy one.
 
Sep 14, 2019
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No, you don't. If point of fact, you should NOT do that. You want to install to the UNALLOCATED, UNPARTITIONED, UNFORMATTED space, for future reference. Windows will create ALL necessary partitions and perform all necessary formatting, itself. Automatically. And it will do a better job than you will of determining exactly what types of partitions, file allocation tables and formatting needs to be done. It's kind of the whole point of doing a clean install, in some cases. It might also be a very real consideration as to whether you end up with a true UEFI installation or a hybrid UEFI legacy one.
I didn't think I should but considering the fact that I have that at that point I had tried everything I could think of I tried it to see if I would get anywhere. I am still willing to try almost anything because at this point I have paid around $1200 for a fancy brick and none of the manufatures will accept my DPO address even though it is a valid US address provided by the USPS... Kinda makes want to cry, Don't want to spend any more money and find out that isn't the problem.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did your board come with a BIOS version that was higher than BIOS version 1.0 or did you flash it to a newer version yourself? If you flashed it to a newer version yourself, and did not do the AMD all in one with video driver update outlined on all the BIOS versions that are newer than version 1.0, that might be a problem. Perhaps there is a work around for it, because it seems you cannot flash back to a version prior to 2.0 after updating. If you look at the BIOS release pages for your board you will see what I am talking about. I don't know that this is relevant to THIS problem, but it could be.

If you have NOT done so already, I would highly recommend that you try performing the following procedure, and THEN try installing Windows again. Also, if that has the same result, then I would try installing Windows to a DIFFERENT storage device/drive. Some other SSD or HDD, to see if perhaps your NVME drive is the problem.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Sep 14, 2019
19
0
10
0
Did your board come with a BIOS version that was higher than BIOS version 1.0 or did you flash it to a newer version yourself? If you flashed it to a newer version yourself, and did not do the AMD all in one with video driver update outlined on all the BIOS versions that are newer than version 1.0, that might be a problem. Perhaps there is a work around for it, because it seems you cannot flash back to a version prior to 2.0 after updating. If you look at the BIOS release pages for your board you will see what I am talking about. I don't know that this is relevant to THIS problem, but it could be.

If you have NOT done so already, I would highly recommend that you try performing the following procedure, and THEN try installing Windows again. Also, if that has the same result, then I would try installing Windows to a DIFFERENT storage device/drive. Some other SSD or HDD, to see if perhaps your NVME drive is the problem.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
The board came with BIOS Version 2.30 from the manufacturer. Also, this is the second SSD I have tried it on. The first one was a Silicon Power SATA drive. I thought that was the cause and got the one I currently have.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would take it all apart and try doing it on the bench/counter/table.

Keep an eye open when you remove the motherboard for any standoffs that might be installed in the case in a location where there is no standoff hole in the motherboard or any fasteners that might have become trapped between the motherboard and the case.

Check for bent pins on the CPU. This is the #1 cause on issues like this, but not, obviously, the only one. Still, we see it happen from time to time even with seasoned builders and often with novice builders.


If you find no other problems with minimal hardware then it makes it a whole lot more probable that it is a motherboard issue.
 

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