Question buy a new power supply

robinmishra

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Hello everyone.
Last year I upgrade my PC but I didn't change my Power Supply, right now I am using Corsair TX 750W Bronze non modular (almost 8 to 9 years old) mostly cables are not useful, so do I need to change it or not?
Motherboard Asus Prime Delux II
CPU : core I7 9800X
RAM : G.SKILL Trident Z RGB 3200MHz DDR4 M 16 GB
GPU : GTX 960 2 GB (I will upgrade with RTX 3070)
M.2 SSD : adata xpg sx8200 pro 512 GB
SSD : two corsair force 3 480GB and intel 120GB
Keyborad & Mouse : mid gamming rgb

USB : seagate backup plus hub 4tb desktop hard disk
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, that unit right now is about four years past it's warranty date, which doesn't automatically make it faulty or useless, but if this is your primary system and you value the hardware in it, plus if you want to avoid any downtime from unexpected PSU failures or damage to any hardware if any of the protections fail to work due to age when the PSU does fail, then it would be a very good idea to replace it now, before that happens.

Bottom line, yes, that unit is REALLY old now and it's a good idea to replace it with something more modern.
 

robinmishra

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So, that unit right now is about four years past it's warranty date, which doesn't automatically make it faulty or useless, but if this is your primary system and you value the hardware in it, plus if you want to avoid any downtime from unexpected PSU failures or damage to any hardware if any of the protections fail to work due to age when the PSU does fail, then it would be a very good idea to replace it now before that happens.

Bottom line, yes, that unit is REALLY old now and it's a good idea to replace it with something more modern.
Thanks for the reply back!
I want to know that Corsair TX 750W Bronze old so does it performance reduce or something like that or it makes an effect on the PC other components performance? and what do you suggest Bronze or Gold; does Gold make any Significant effect on PC performance and reduce power consumption?
Actually, I am a Graphic Designer and I work almost 10 to 12 hrs. (but not continuously) so what would you suggest 750W or 850W and
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What CAPACITY of power supply you should get will completely be dependent upon what model of RTX 3070 you get. Some models will probably require the ability to supply a higher amperage/wattage than other models. Depends on whether it's a founders edition (Reference design) card, a base aftermarket model or an overclocked aftermarket model. However, it is very likely that a 650w model, if it is a quality unit, will be plenty for any RTX 3070 and if you plan to do a little CPU or GPU overclocking, or simply wish to have a bit of extra headroom in order to keep the PSU operating in the middle of it's highest efficiency and performance envelope, then a 750w unit is not a bad idea.

You don't need anything more than that unless you plan to go with a higher tiered RTX 30 series model though.

Yes, it's age can have an effect on the performance of other components. Not only can it have an effect, but if it fails badly, it could potentially even cause harm.

From worst to best, any of these would be good to excellent options.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹10586.00 @ Amazon India)
Total: ₹10586.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:56 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair RMi 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹14999.00 @ Amazon India)
Total: ₹14999.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:56 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹16562.18 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹16562.18
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair HX Platinum 850 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹22244.62 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹22244.62
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: SeaSonic PRIME Ultra Titanium 750 W 80+ Titanium Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹22660.70 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹22660.70
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530
 

robinmishra

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Jul 4, 2012
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What CAPACITY of power supply you should get will completely be dependent upon what model of RTX 3070 you get. Some models will probably require the ability to supply a higher amperage/wattage than other models. Depends on whether it's a founder's edition (Reference design) card, a base aftermarket model or an overclocked aftermarket model. However, it is very likely that a 650w model, if it is a quality unit, will be plenty for any RTX 3070 and if you plan to do a little CPU or GPU overclocking, or simply wish to have a bit of extra headroom in order to keep the PSU operating in the middle of it's highest efficiency and performance envelope, then a 750w unit is not a bad idea.

You don't need anything more than that unless you plan to go with a higher tiered RTX 30 series model though.

Yes, it's age can have an effect on the performance of other components. Not only can it have an effect, but if it fails badly, it could potentially even cause harm.

From worst to best, any of these would be good to excellent options.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹10586.00 @ Amazon India)
Total: ₹10586.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:56 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair RMi 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹14999.00 @ Amazon India)
Total: ₹14999.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:56 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹16562.18 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹16562.18
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair HX Platinum 850 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹22244.62 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹22244.62
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: SeaSonic PRIME Ultra Titanium 750 W 80+ Titanium Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply (₹22660.70 @ Newegg India)
Total: ₹22660.70
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-10-12 03:57 IST+0530
Thanks again for a reply back, and I thought that your information really helps full. few things more about overclocking so I never overclock my PC or GPU so I thought that 750W would be sufficient. about the GPU so I am not a very hardcore gamer and the more important things are BUDGET because of recently buy data xpg sx8200 pro 512 GB M.2 but after the installation, it if realize that my P.C performance does not Increase that much that I thought (so I realize that not only M.2 make good performance other hardware also makes a difference too) that is why I am thinking about the change the PSU. about GPU so I say budget also important so I can wait for RTX3060 (I thought that would be also enough for me.?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, the RTX 3060, if and when they come, should be a very capable card. More than enough for 1080p or 1440p ultra gaming. And should need a lower capacity power supply as well. Probably a 650w unit will be plenty for one of them BUT if you think that is what you might want to do then it would probably enough to simply get a very good 650w unit, since you don't plan to overclock.
 

robinmishra

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Yes, the RTX 3060, if and when they come, should be a very capable card. More than enough for 1080p or 1440p ultra gaming. And should need a lower capacity power supply as well. Probably a 650w unit will be plenty for one of them BUT if you think that is what you might want to do then it would probably enough to simply get a very good 650w unit, since you don't plan to overclock.
Thanks, but I will go 750W or Above. what do you think about https://www.gigabyte.com/Power-Supply/GP-P750GM#kf it is in under budget.
 
Some 9 years ago, you invested in a quality psu that has worked well for you over the years.
750w is sufficient power for anything you might want to do. Even 650w will be sufficient.
3070 looks to need an 8 pin connector supplying 150w.
That plus 75w from the pcie slot still leaves plenty of power left for the processor.
You need not change it out as a pre-emptive measure unless you have some doubts.

If you are inclined to change out your psu, buy a top quality unit with a 10 year warrant like a 650/750w seasonic focus gold:
https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-focus-plus-650-gold-ssr-650fx-650w/p/N82E16817151186
 

robinmishra

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Some 9 years ago, you invested in a quality psu that has worked well for you over the years.
750w is sufficient power for anything you might want to do. Even 650w will be sufficient.
3070 looks to need an 8 pin connector supplying 150w.
That plus 75w from the pcie slot still leaves plenty of power left for the processor.
You need not change it out as a pre-emptive measure unless you have some doubts.

If you are inclined to change out your psu, buy a top quality unit with a 10 year warrant like a 650/750w seasonic focus gold:
https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-focus-plus-650-gold-ssr-650fx-650w/p/N82E16817151186
Thanks for the reply, actually I thought this too. because I never found any issue or problem with my pc (old and new one) because I use APC PSU backup too, and sometimes power fluctuation but my PC Never re-start or off, but This is when the APC battery became old.
Anyway in Short you are saying that I don't need to change it. but I want to know that Corsair TX 750W Bronze old so does it performance reduce or something like that or it makes an effect on the PC other components performance?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
And I, happen to disagree. I would absolutely change it out as a preemptive measure. Once something happens, then it too damn late to second guess the decision to leave a 9 year old power supply in there with your new, and expensive hardware. I really doubt that Geofelt would leave a 9 year old PSU, especially a 9 year old PSU from 9 years ago (Maybe not one of the CURRENT generation units with a 10-12 year warranty, which are BUILT to last that long) back when there WEREN'T any power supplies with 10 year warranties. The best power supplies from 8-10 years ago had only five year warranties.

If the manufacturer believes the unit is only solidly reliable for five years, I'm not going to argue with that. Yes, I might use it still, with LESS important hardware, but I'm not going to continue using it with my primary system, especially if my primary system is one I just built recently with expensive parts and a new PSU only costs a fraction of what those parts cost.

 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I am no expert either. No more than you are really.

Mostly that is just my opinion based on my experiences and beliefs, as well as some pretty sound advice from some people who ARE experts, along the way.

But there are also a few other good reasons as well. One of them is the fact that most newer models will likely have not only some protections not in place on that older unit, but also some very real improvements over the existing protections that it does have. Better, more efficient platforms. Better cooling through more thoughtful component placement internally. Quieter operation. Longer lifespan. Better efficiency at most price points.

But I think the most important consideration here, with a 9 year old unit, is simply reliability and the potential for failure. Failure that with a 9 year old unit could also mean a failure in a critical protection, which could potentially mean something more than just the power supply stops working. That would be my biggest fear. I mean, if a guy can spend nearly (Or more than) a thousand dollars on new hardware, spending another 100 dollars to make sure it is well taken care of doesn't seem like much of a stretch to me.
 

robinmishra

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I am no expert either. No more than you are really.

Mostly that is just my opinion based on my experiences and beliefs, as well as some pretty sound advice from some people who ARE experts, along the way.

But there are also a few other good reasons as well. One of them is the fact that most newer models will likely have not only some protections not in place on that older unit, but also some very real improvements over the existing protections that it does have. Better, more efficient platforms. Better cooling through more thoughtful component placement internally. Quieter operation. Longer lifespan. Better efficiency at most price points.

But I think the most important consideration here, with a 9 year old unit, is simply reliability and the potential for failure. Failure that with a 9 year old unit could also mean a failure in a critical protection, which could potentially mean something more than just the power supply stops working. That would be my biggest fear. I mean, if a guy can spend nearly (Or more than) a thousand dollars on new hardware, spending another 100 dollars to make sure it is well taken care of doesn't seem like much of a stretch to me.
 

robinmishra

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Thanks again reply, look I will definitely change my power supply, and the main reason will be the change of extra wires and more power efficiency. about the warranty so tell CPU, GPU, MB, RAM these have three to five-year warranty so don't mean that you have to change them after warrant out, this performance depends on the OS, Software updations. that is why I buy Intel Extreme processor (there life 7 to 10 years which mean that they can handle the software's update long time. ) you can see now these days PSU has a 7 to 10 years warranty.

My main concern about the performance of PC: before M.2 SSD : adata xpg sx8200 pro 512 GB I use corsair force 3 480GB for OS, and M.2 almost 6 times faster or maybe more but still I didn't feel that my PC performance has improved (most probably I have to change GPU next month RTX 3070 launch) and that is why I thought that PSU is old and it might affect little bit PC performance.
otherwise, I update my pc last year in August, and still, I used this old PSU, but thank guys I will change my PSU next month.
which one you suggest
Antec hcg750W 80 plus gold (a little bit over my budget) 10 years
gigabyte p750gm 80 plus gold (under my budget) 7 years
I am thinking about corsair but it's expensive
 
Reasons to change out PSU:

1) The capacitors age and no longer filter properly. DC 12v ---- be like ~~~~. The dielectric evaporates over time. There's no way to avoid that. More heat tolerant caps last longer, and warranty period reflects what the manufacturer thinks about that duration. Unfiltered ripple from the PSU will then shorten the lifetime of the caps on your graphics card and motherboard as it makes them work harder and hotter until things just start crashing due to failed clock cycles.

2) New ATX standards for sleep states, Pstates, ect. Modern platforms (new CPUs/motherboards) will be limited on older PSUs that do not support the new settings. This affects efficiency, but is not as important as #1.
 
On the ssd:

1. m.2 is a size standard, not a performance indicator.
M.2 can be sata or pcie.

2. pcie allows for considerably faster sequential data transfer compared to sata. Perhaps 5x faster.
But the most common and important performance metric is single thread latency. For that, all ssd devices are remarkably similar. pcie 4.0 will allow even faster transfers, and there are already some ssd devices that support pcie 4.0. But, the reality is that you will likely not notice the difference.
For a fast antivirus scan, perhaps.

3. Do not be much swayed by vendor synthetic SSD benchmarks.
They are done with apps that push the SSD to it's maximum using queue lengths of 30 or so.
Most desktop users will do one or two things at a time, so they will see queue lengths of one or two.
What really counts is the response times, particularly for small random I/O. That is what the os does most

4. Performance of a ssd can differ, depending on the usage.
For a bit of insight and comparison between ssd devices, go to the Anandtech ssd Bench app.
You can enter two ssd devices to compare:
https://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/2389?vs=2432
 

robinmishra

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On the ssd:

1. m.2 is a size standard, not a performance indicator.
M.2 can be sata or pcie.

2. pcie allows for considerably faster sequential data transfer compared to sata. Perhaps 5x faster.
But the most common and important performance metric is single thread latency. For that, all ssd devices are remarkably similar. pcie 4.0 will allow even faster transfers, and there are already some ssd devices that support pcie 4.0. But, the reality is that you will likely not notice the difference.
For a fast antivirus scan, perhaps.

3. Do not be much swayed by vendor synthetic SSD benchmarks.
They are done with apps that push the SSD to it's maximum using queue lengths of 30 or so.
Most desktop users will do one or two things at a time, so they will see queue lengths of one or two.
What really counts is the response times, particularly for small random I/O. That is what the os does most

4. Performance of a ssd can differ, depending on the usage.
For a bit of insight and comparison between ssd devices, go to the Anandtech ssd Bench app.
You can enter two ssd devices to compare:
https://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/2389?vs=2432
Thanks for the reply back, it really helps full, and other people are also given good advice, I will definitely change the power supply. right now I am checking which I should buy.
 

robinmishra

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On the ssd:

1. m.2 is a size standard, not a performance indicator.
M.2 can be sata or pcie.

2. pcie allows for considerably faster sequential data transfer compared to sata. Perhaps 5x faster.
But the most common and important performance metric is single thread latency. For that, all ssd devices are remarkably similar. pcie 4.0 will allow even faster transfers, and there are already some ssd devices that support pcie 4.0. But, the reality is that you will likely not notice the difference.
For a fast antivirus scan, perhaps.

3. Do not be much swayed by vendor synthetic SSD benchmarks.
They are done with apps that push the SSD to it's maximum using queue lengths of 30 or so.
Most desktop users will do one or two things at a time, so they will see queue lengths of one or two.
What really counts is the response times, particularly for small random I/O. That is what the os does most

4. Performance of a ssd can differ, depending on the usage.
For a bit of insight and comparison between ssd devices, go to the Anandtech ssd Bench app.
You can enter two ssd devices to compare:
https://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/2389?vs=2432
Thanks for your advice, it really helps full .
 

robinmishra

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Reasons to change out PSU:

1) The capacitors age and no longer filter properly. DC 12v ---- be like ~~~~. The dielectric evaporates over time. There's no way to avoid that. More heat tolerant caps last longer, and warranty period reflects what the manufacturer thinks about that duration. Unfiltered ripple from the PSU will then shorten the lifetime of the caps on your graphics card and motherboard as it makes them work harder and hotter until things just start crashing due to failed clock cycles.

2) New ATX standards for sleep states, Pstates, ect. Modern platforms (new CPUs/motherboards) will be limited on older PSUs that do not support the new settings. This affects efficiency, but is not as important as #1.
Thanks!
 

robinmishra

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I have the last question which one PSU I should buy: In Gold
Corsair RM750i
Corsair RM750
Antec EARTHWATTS GOLD PRO 750W (Sami Modular)
Antec HCG 750 Gold

Gigabyte P750GM 80 Plus Gold
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
One is higher quality than the other, and the 750i has features not found on the RM750.


But the RM is a good unit as well. It's just not AS good. Either of those units is better than any of the others you listed though.
 

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