Question Does hardware (GPU-CPU) start wearing out if running over 40*c?

Oct 9, 2020
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Search up the temp limits for your hardware. For the most part gpu's can take up to around 82° and the cpu around 100°. Of course you don't want them at that temperature but they've been designed to handle it. I'd say nothing abouv 85-90° on a top of the line cpu and 75° on a top of the line gpu as they tend to run hotter anyway.
 
Search up the temp limits for your hardware. For the most part gpu's can take up to around 82° and the cpu around 100°. Of course you don't want them at that temperature but they've been designed to handle it. I'd say nothing abouv 85-90° on a top of the line cpu and 75° on a top of the line gpu as they tend to run hotter anyway.
I'd say something about a CPU operating at 85-90°. I'd say you have a major cooling problem and your CPU is throttling.
 
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I'd say something about a CPU operating at 85-90°. I'd say you have a major cooling problem and your CPU is throttling.
My GPU is 48 sometimes 50c at 100% load and cpu wont exceed 65c at 100% load, someone just told me my cooling is bad and 50c is high, then he is wrong, thanks for answers
 
The short answer is 'yes'. Anytime it's powered it is degrading, that's just the way electron migration works.

The long answer to the question: how long until it wears out? That depends entirely on how well it was designed, but the phrase "over 40C" encompasses a huge territory that includes something above 95C, the usual Tjmax spec for modern CPU's, in which case it won't last long. But if somewhere 'around' 40C, a modern CPU or GPU should last a pretty long time I'd imagine.
 
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I'd say something about a CPU operating at 85-90°. I'd say you have a major cooling problem and your CPU is throttling.
well yes but it's a safe operating temperature. If you have something like an i5, i7, ryzen 5 or a ryzen 7 then yeh that's way hotter than it should be but if you've got an i9 10900k at 5.3ghz on all cores or something then 90° would be fine.
 

hotaru.hino

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Simply using the electronics is wearing it out. Running the component hotter will wear it out faster by a rate of 2x for every 10C (this is a rule of thumb I've heard, so take it with a grain of salt). However the problem is this: we don't really know how long electronics are supposed to last. We've got people who've been running Core 2 based systems as their daily drivers or at least seeing a lot of use. Systems that are up to 15 years old.

Keeping the part cooler is a good idea, but lifespan is nothing you really need to worry about.

EDIT: Someone actually did an article about that rule of thumb https://www.electronics-cooling.com/2017/08/10c-increase-temperature-really-reduce-life-electronics-half/

tl;dr, it actually only applies in very specific situations. So it likely doesn't apply to consumer computers.
 

Nigel Spike

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I bought a Compaq with a 486DX CPU in 1994 and it didn't have the best cooling. Most people then did not really care about cooling then. The PC died in 2016 from a broken hard drive. The CPU was still fine.
 

Karadjgne

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The “10°C increase = half life” rule is based on applying the Arrhenius equation, which relates the rate of chemical reactions, R, to temperature, to failure mechanisms that occur in electronics.
A cpu doesn't operate under chemical reactions, whereas other componentry such as electrolytic capacitors do.

The average (ish) physical lifespan of a cpu not directly abused by over-voltage, electro migration, burnouts etc, is well over 20 years. That's far beyond any normal idea of Usable lifespan as determined by software.

'Normal' considered 'safe range' of operation temps being that of @ 70°C or under for constant usage on a cpu, a gpus Usable lifespan is far shorter than that of cpus, (for gaming purposes) so 80°C or under.

Motherboards have a couple hundred different components, all of which have their own 'safe temps' and aren't regulated by 'motherboard temp'. A Sata controller chipset can easily reach 90°C, as can pcie hub, VRM's, Southbridge, super i/o etc, non of which get included in the 35°C reported motherboard temp.

So take temps with a grain of salt. They are a tool for guidance only and should be used as such. They are by no means Gospel, nor should be taken as such, every pc setup is different. Just because 1 person gets 33°C on cpu, someone withe the same setup isn't guaranteed that, so at 36°C there's nothing wrong.
 
... Running the component hotter will wear it out faster by a rate of 2x for every 10C (this is a rule of thumb I've heard, so take it with a grain of salt)....
I'm not sure that's going to be very accurate, and certainly not that simple. If you want to know with better accuracy degradation due to electron migration is modeled with Black's Equation. If you take a look at it you'll note the temperature component is tucked away in an exponent, so it's relationship is going to be non-linear and doubtless increasing at a much MUCH faster rate at higher temp's than lower temps.
 

hotaru.hino

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I'm not sure that's going to be very accurate, and certainly not that simple. If you want to know with better accuracy degradation due to electron migration is modeled with Black's Equation. If you take a look at it you'll note the temperature component is tucked away in an exponent, so it's relationship is going to be non-linear and doubtless increasing at a much MUCH faster rate at higher temp's than lower temps.
Either way, the problem with anything regarding how much X will decrease the life of electronics is we don't even know what the life expectancy is supposed to be in the first place. Various parts of the CPU are used at different rates and it depends on how it was used. So it could be X years in one case, but Y years in another, and they could have a spread of 20 years.

So ultimately, worrying about life expectancy is about as useful as contemplating the lint in your navel. Chances are, the hardware will be long abandoned due to obsolescence before it dies.
 
Either way, the problem with anything regarding how much X will decrease the life of electronics is we don't even know what the life expectancy is supposed to be in the first place.
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Quite frankly, if you keep either your CPU or GPU in 'front line action' for more than 5 years you'll be an oddity. So effectively it's useful life is just that: 5 years and that makes any discussions about longer life something of a curiosity. I used to work in aerospace, we routinely de-rated processors to operate at lower clocks/voltages and be powered down when not use in order to assure very long life for orbital space craft. The expectation then was a 20 year service life but the mode of death was more often than not stray gamma rays that blast through it's rad-hard packaging. Even back here on earth semiconductors are susceptible to gamma ray death (with 7nm geometries I have to think very much so) but they aren't rad hardened either.

By 'frontline action' I mean your principle machine that you need to perform the most demanding tasks (including gaming) and therefore likely to thermally stress, or even overclock, frequently.
 
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Karadjgne

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Physical lifespan = actual hardware longetivity.
Usable lifespan = hardware governed by software.

There's plenty of old cpus, even back as far as the 386SX/486DX or pre-Core series Pentium 1, P2, P4 cpus that are still functional, even on original equipment motherboards, but software such as Windows has rendered them obsolete, not only from a cpu standpoint, but other considerations such as ram requirements. You can run those old cpus on upto Win98SE, as that'll run fine on 1Gb or less of ram, but by WinXP/Vista/Win7 you really needed a minimum of 4Gb of ram for decent functionality. Those old motherboards were capping out at 1Gb or even 512Mb of SDRAM, DDR etc.

Do they still work, Yes. Do they work with Windows 10? Not really well at all. They've far exceeded their Usable lifespan, whether or not their physical lifespan or range is even a consideration.
 

xravenxdota

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I have my first dual core pc which is a amd 4600+ x 2 socket 939 that i got in 2005 still running fine.There's no set rule on how long a part will last.You run 60c that's acceptable.My 1070 ti which doesn't have direct air cause of my radiator runs at 80-82c when i test my pc.I lock everything to 60 as i do not play competitive games.Either components can last many years and sometime not.I got my dual core oc'd for the last 5+years and she's still running strong.
 

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