Question Getting new GPU. Need input on bottleneck risks

Vax

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Oct 27, 2013
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This is my current build:

Mobo: GIGABYTE G1 Z97X-Gaming 5
CPU: i7-4790K (not overclocked)
RAM: 32GB DDR3
Case: Antec 1200 v3 Full Tower

Upgrading from GTX 980 to RTX 2080ti.

My concern is this: Will there, as far as you guys can see, be any bottlenecks/incompatibility(mostly hardware wise...Like are the sockets gonna match?) if I upgrade my GPU but leave my other components as is? The GPU's already gonna be pretty pricey, so if at all possible I'd rather not have to upgrade, but if it results in me getting less out of my new GPU as a result? I'll bite the bullet.

Thanks for any input/advice you can give! \o/
 

Tioym

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Apr 5, 2020
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If you're playing at 1080p then yeah it will bottleneck enough to matter. I'd recommend upto a 2070 or 2060S with that CPU.
If you upgrade to 1440p then it wont.
 
A lot depends on the monitor resolution, what is your monitor resolution and Hz? Also the 2080Ti will be superseded in less than 6 months. The 3080 should perform equally or better and be much better with Ray Tracing. NVidia are saying the 3060 will outperform the 2080Ti with Ray Tracing. I just think the 2080Ti is a terrible but at the moment to only have a few months as the best gaming gpu.
 

Vax

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A lot depends on the monitor resolution, what is your monitor resolution and Hz? Also the 2080Ti will be superseded in less than 6 months. The 3080 should perform equally or better and be much better with Ray Tracing. NVidia are saying the 3060 will outperform the 2080Ti with Ray Tracing. I just think the 2080Ti is a terrible but at the moment to only have a few months as the best gaming gpu.
So given your reply, the only obstacle would be my monitor then?
 

Vax

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My point was at higher resolutions you are less likely to see a bottleneck and if running 60Hz higher FPS is less important.
My current monitor is 60hz. I was planning on getting a new curved 27' monitor. If I do that do you think it'll work?
 

Tioym

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My current monitor is 60hz. I was planning on getting a new curved 27' monitor. If I do that do you think it'll work?
don't upgrade your gpu to 2080ti before your monitor. I would even urge you to go for a 2070 or 2060S and then spend money on a 1440P 144Hz monitor
 
First, a RTX2080ti will usually need two 8 pin psu power connectors.
What is the make/model of your psu?
Past that issue, there should be no compatibility issues.

There is no such thing as "bottlenecking"
If, by that, you mean that upgrading a cpu or graphics card can
somehow lower your performance or FPS.
A better term might be limiting factor.
That is where adding more cpu or gpu becomes increasingly
less effective.

You WILL do better, the question is by how much.
Particularly for fast action games.
Here is a simple test:
Run YOUR games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
This makes the graphics card loaf a bit.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely more cpu limited.

On the cpu side, you are leaving some 20% performance on the table by not overclocking.
K suffix processors are designed for overclocking.
How well you can do will be determined by your luck in getting a well binned chip and perhaps by the effectiveness of your case/cooler combination.
 

Tioym

Proper
Apr 5, 2020
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First, a RTX2080ti will usually need two 8 pin psu power connectors.
What is the make/model of your psu?
Past that issue, there should be no compatibility issues.

There is no such thing as "bottlenecking"
If, by that, you mean that upgrading a cpu or graphics card can
somehow lower your performance or FPS.
A better term might be limiting factor.
That is where adding more cpu or gpu becomes increasingly
less effective.

You WILL do better, the question is by how much.
Particularly for fast action games.
Here is a simple test:
Run YOUR games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
This makes the graphics card loaf a bit.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely more cpu limited.

On the cpu side, you are leaving some 20% performance on the table by not overclocking.
K suffix processors are designed for overclocking.
How well you can do will be determined by your luck in getting a well binned chip and perhaps by the effectiveness of your case/cooler combination.
His CPU cant handle an RTX 2080 Ti at 1080p. His CPU will be sitting at 100% while GPU at like 70%. This can also cause a lot of stuttering in CPU reliant games. I disagree with your suggestion. Why would anyone buy an RTX 2080Ti if they only plan to use 70% of it.
 
Certainly the op cpu can handle a RTX2080ti. The question is would something lesser do sufficiently well.

Some games are graphics limited like fast action shooters.
Others are cpu core speed limited like strategy, sims, and mmo.
Multiplayer tends to like many threads.
If the op's games are graphics limited, then a graphics upgrade is in order.
Hence my suggestion for a test to find out.

One might think that a smaller upgrade, say to something like a RTX2070 super would be sufficient.
That is not our decision to make.
I have always found that buying the best is the best strategy.
The price hurts for a little while, but regrets from not buying strong enough lasts much longer.
The OP has an opportunity to increase the cpu performance if that is needed.
If in doubt, it is a reasonable strategy to buy a lesser EVGA card, intending to take advantage of their free 90 day trade up option if something stronger was wanted. Read the mice type on their web site for detailed requirements.
 
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