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How To Browse Privately After Congress Nixed FCC Protections

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ledhead11

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Oct 10, 2014
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Thanks for the tips. I thought I read here and a few other places that TOR browser had some vulnerabilities that were being exploited. Has it been patched?
I haven't read it yet but there's link to an article about VPN's having some susceptibility to the new rulings too on [H]ardOcp.
 

plateLunch

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Add one more option: If you have a Republican representative or Senator, WRITE THEM and let them know how you feel. Tell them you have technical expertise and they have made a big mistake. Tell them you do tech support for your neighborhood and you're telling all your neighbors about how their privacy is going to be sold and the rep or senator is responsible. Collect privacy horror stories such as someone searching about a medical condition and seeing his insurance rates suspiciously go up. Tell your rep or senator that the neighborhood is upset now and they're holding him/her responsible.
Sometimes the solutions aren't all technical.
 

schwatzz

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Jun 23, 2014
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They don't care
 

BoredSysAdmin

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https will encrypt the content of your bank page, your pay stubs online or your shopping cart at large online vendor, but it won't hide your tracks that you visited citi.com, adp.com or amazon.com.
Not talking about clear text dns requests - there is cure for that DNSCrypt (google if curious), but SNI implementation in current https handshake required domain address to be sent in clear test before encryption could start.
 

knowom

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This went through and passed due to both parties of republicans and democrat's so keep the political fodder out of it. Neither party stopped these changes from happening or really openly tried to do so quite frankly or at least not enough from either party to make a difference.
 

mrmez

Splendid
You can argue rep/dem all day, the fact is allowing your politicians to be legally bribed is setting up everyone to fail.
Get rid of private organisations paying politicians, and raise their salary to ridiculous levels so they have absolutely zero financial incentive to anyones b!tch.
 

coldmast

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More like, fund a lobbyist to lobby your representative with money. Welcome to corpocracy, America! I for one, do not welcome our new corporate overlords.
 

ledhead11

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Seems to me it could work both ways since it can't be fought at the moment.

Info can be bought on citizens. . . . .why can't info be bought on the politicians?
 

Druidsmark

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Just tested HTTPS Everywhere and due to a bad certificate or some thing this site gets blocked and Mozilla Firefox thinks this site is unsafe thus Tomshardware gets blocked preventing me from loading this web site. As I use Kaperskey for my anti virus software The combination of both Kapersky and HTTPS Everywhere result in this website being blocked as Tomshardware becomes unsafe to visit. I have chosen to remove HTTPS Everywhere as result of thism as I trust Tomshardware to be a safe website to visit.
 

hannibal

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The problem is that Toms hardware is not "safe" place to visit, because it lack the https protocol... like it has been mentioned above. But as you Also said I like to visit this site because of interesting content. I just hope that They would be more interested in security Also...
 

plateLunch

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The resolution to sell your privacy was passed along party lines. In the senate, the vote was 50 for, all Republicans, 48 against, all Democrats. In the house, the vote was 215 for, all Republicans vs. 205 against, all Democrats plus a handful of Republicans who were willing to stand up for privacy. I applaud those Republicans for not buying the clueless argument that an ISP needs the same opportunities to sell your info as an edge service such as Google and Facebook.

I've been using OpenDNS to try to avoid some tracking plus get some site filtering but Comcast already seems to be blocking them. OpenDNS is rated unreliable when testing with GRC DNS Benchmark.
 

spiketheaardvark

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Comcast has said it won't sell "individual customers " data. It's an interesting choice of words that leaves open selling bulk data and definitely means they are collecting and using data internally.
 

Giroro

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"How did all this information about the Trump administration's contact with Russia leak? "

"Easy, they bought it from Comcast and ATT"

Mass surveillance doesn't need a warrant when a government is buying information from a third party. Somebody should tell trump that Obama is using his ISP to spy on trump tower, or whatever. Then maybe he won't sign it
 

ledhead11

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This sort of goes with the point I was making above.

Many speak of their concerns with a government buying info on them but few seem to realise that 'buying/selling' implies that anyone can potentially buy the information. Where's the regulation specifying those options?
 

rantoc

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I have a feeling foreign VPN services from country's who have privacy laws worth more than toilet paper will flourish, US vpn providers are just as likely to prey on their customers with this vacuum in privacy laws. Privacy feels more like the wild west for each day that passes where every commercial entity is allowed do to whatever it pleases to earn more money.
 

alextheblue

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"How To Browse Privately After Congress Nixed FCC Protections"

1) Unplug all modems and network equipment. Disable anything with a wireless connection, permanently.
2) Wear a disguise your mother couldn't see through
3) Go to a public library and sign up for a library card using false credentials
4) Browse the internet using their systems - but be certain not to do anything that might draw the attention of the Grid Overwatch Division (or any LE/alphabet organizations).

Oh, in case you didn't notice, these steps haven't been altered by a change in FCC policy.
"Future Of Web Privacy Looks Uncertain"
It looks the same as it has in the past decade and change. Web privacy is nearly an oxymoron. This article was good for a laugh though.
 
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