[SOLVED] How to make 1050Ti work with Freesync?

Altair44

Honorable
Jul 10, 2014
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I have this Samsung monitor and it supports Freesync. Also i know, it is not in the officially supported "GSync Compatible" monitors list. But since it supports freesync, it should work with new nVidia drivers?

I have a GTX 1050Ti and i updated the drivers to the latest. But i do not see any option like it shows on nvidia's website. Currently, I use an HDMI-HDMI cable to connect gcard and monitor. Do i need a DISPLAY PORT - HDMI connector to make it work? Since i read somewhere it works on displayport? Forgot where i read that.

Have anyone made their monitor's freesync work with GTX 1050Ti?

NOTE: My Graphics card has 1 HDMI, 1 Display Port and 1 VGA ports. But the monitor only have 1 HDMI port.
 
if you want to use Gsync compatible monitor to use the adaptive sync feature on nvidia GPU you strictly need display port connector. meaning both monitor and your GPU must support display connector. some freesync certified monitors only have HDMI because AMD made proprietary solution so the VRR will work over HDMI for their freesync. this is before HDMI 2.1 spec exist to officially support VRR.
 

Abstuurz

Proper
Feb 19, 2019
127
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It's not possible, there was a way to use Freesync with a Ryzen APU while using nvidia Gpu, but it got updated on newer firmwares i think, don't know if it is still possible.
You can't go Freesync with Nvidia or Gsync with AMD.
Gsync = Nvidia
Freesync = AMD
 
It's not possible, there was a way to use Freesync with a Ryzen APU while using nvidia Gpu, but it got updated on newer firmwares i think, don't know if it is still possible.
You can't go Freesync with Nvidia or Gsync with AMD.
Gsync = Nvidia
Freesync = AMD
Previously, Nvidia's support was limited to its own G-Sync displays, while AMD supported the open FreeSync standard.

Six years after G-Sync debuted, Nvidia's proprietary variable refresh rate (VRR) solution for gaming monitors is becoming a little more open. The company announced at CES 2019 that it will soon certify certain FreeSync monitors as 'G-Sync Compatible'. That's big news, as it means that Nvidia graphics card owners will have the option of buying FreeSync gaming monitors instead of being limited to G-Sync models, which are often significantly more expensive due to their physical G-Sync module.

Nvidia tested more than 400 FreeSync monitors to find those that met its standards for G-Sync. That included looking at metrics like a wide frame-rate range where VRR could be enabled (eg 60Hz to 144Hz), whether VRR was enabled by default and whether VRR gaming produced any unwanted artefacts like ghosting or flickering. Just 12 monitors made the cut, and they have become the first G-Sync Compatible monitors on the market. G-Sync Compatible monitor support arrived in the first 2019 Game Ready driver, which was released on January 15th.
 
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Reactions: Abstuurz
if you want to use Gsync compatible monitor to use the adaptive sync feature on nvidia GPU you strictly need display port connector. meaning both monitor and your GPU must support display connector. some freesync certified monitors only have HDMI because AMD made proprietary solution so the VRR will work over HDMI for their freesync. this is before HDMI 2.1 spec exist to officially support VRR.
 
Only certain monitors support this. But NVIDIA states you need DisplayPort cable for that. You'll have to try and see if it works for you over HDMI, because I can't confirm or deny DP vs HDMI statement.

NVIDIA’s new support for FreeSync monitors is via a program called “G-SYNC Compatible.” NVIDIA GPUs now work with FreeSync monitors with “G-SYNC Compatible” enabled in the configuration tool.

How to Enable “G-SYNC Compatible” Mode on Any FreeSync Monitor
Here’s what you’ll need to enable G-SYNC Compatible mode if your monitor isn’t certified by NVIDIA:
  • A FreeSync (adaptive sync) capable monitor
  • An NVIDIA GTX or RTX graphics card (laptops with internal discrete cards are fine too)
  • A DisplayPort cable connecting them (Mini-DisplayPort is fine)
  • NVIDIA GPU drivers, 417.71 or later
Once you’ve confirmed that your monitor is FreeSync compatible and you’re using a DisplayPort cable, check the on-screen menu of your monitor. That’s the one that you activate via the physical buttons on the monitor. Go into the menu and make sure that the Adaptive Sync or FreeSync function is enabled.

Now, in Windows, open the NVIDIA Control Panel by right-clicking your desktop and selecting “NVIDIA Control Panel.”

You can also find a shortcut to the NVIDIA Control Panel in the Start menu or as an icon in the Windows Control Panel.

In the NVIDIA Control Panel, you should see “Set up G-SYNC” under the “Display” menu on the left side. If you don’t see “Set up G-SYNC” as an option and you’re sure it’s enabled by your monitor, you might need to install drivers for your monitor manually.

In the Set Up G-SYNC screen, make sure your main monitor is selected if you have more than one. Click the check mark next to “Enable G-SYNC, G-SYNC Compatible.” Choose whether to enable it for full screen mode only or both windowed and full screen modes, depending on how you display your games.

Click “Apply” to enable G-SYNC/FreeSync.
 
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Abstuurz

Proper
Feb 19, 2019
127
13
195
14
Previously, Nvidia's support was limited to its own G-Sync displays, while AMD supported the open FreeSync standard.

Six years after G-Sync debuted, Nvidia's proprietary variable refresh rate (VRR) solution for gaming monitors is becoming a little more open. The company announced at CES 2019 that it will soon certify certain FreeSync monitors as 'G-Sync Compatible'. That's big news, as it means that Nvidia graphics card owners will have the option of buying FreeSync gaming monitors instead of being limited to G-Sync models, which are often significantly more expensive due to their physical G-Sync module.

Nvidia tested more than 400 FreeSync monitors to find those that met its standards for G-Sync. That included looking at metrics like a wide frame-rate range where VRR could be enabled (eg 60Hz to 144Hz), whether VRR was enabled by default and whether VRR gaming produced any unwanted artefacts like ghosting or flickering. Just 12 monitors made the cut, and they have become the first G-Sync Compatible monitors on the market. G-Sync Compatible monitor support will arrive in the first 2019 Game Ready driver, which is scheduled to be released on January 15th.

Oh, alright, something that i've missed. Thanks for that save mate.
Can believe nvidia did this turn, which is pretty good.
 

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