Question Motherboard doesn’t detect any GPU

Nov 20, 2019
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I recently bought an “Aorus B450 Pro” for my first build.
Everything went fine, pc booted and I managed to download a few apps; all of this when I noticed that it wasn’t detecting my GPU.
My GPU is an RTX 2080, but I can’t find it anywhere in my pc. I tried using GPU-Z, I updated the BIOS, and I tried installing the latest drivers ( though I couldn’t because it wasn’t even showing up on GeForce Experience ).

I borrowed my friend’s pc and I plugged in my GPU; it was showing up fine, and we even tested some games.
Then, I plugged his GPU in my pc, but it didn’t work, that too wasn’t showing up.

I tried every Pcle slot with both his and my GPU, but still, no results.
Is there any way to fix it?

Edit : PSU is a 750W Gold+ which I guess is more than enough ( CPU is a Ryzen 3600X )
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Plug the display into the graphics card, not the motherboard.

Double check that the PCI auxiliary power cables from the PSU are plugged into the graphics card.

As a last resort, and after doing both of the above, WITH the graphics card installed, power plugged into it and the display connected TO the graphics card, with the power off, do the following.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



If that fails to work then you either have a CPU or motherboard with bent pins, or a bad motherboard. Or a really crappy power supply.

What is the EXACT model of your power supply?
 
Nov 20, 2019
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PSU is a Corsair RM750X.
As I said pc is booting up fine ( forgot to mention when pluggin display directly on the gpu ).
BIOS is fully accessible, I even updated it.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If there is a display when the display cable is connected to the graphics card, then it is working. Period. It can't "not be working" and still have a display if the cable is not connected to the motherboard. Obviously, since that CPU DOES NOT HAVE any integrated graphics then in order for you to HAVE a display, of ANY kind, the graphics card would HAVE to be working. So, it is working, whether you think it is or not.

What it is PROBABLY not doing, is working CORRECTLY. The reason it is not working correctly is probably because you have not installed the CORRECT driver package.

Do a CLEAN install install of the Nvidia drivers, using the DDU, and you should be fine.

 
Nov 20, 2019
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It didn’t work, now the Nvidia driver installer is saying that it isn’t compatible with my Windows version ( Win10 Pro ).
I tried clearing the CMOS, didn’t work either.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Reset the CMOS, as follows. Remove the graphics card BEFORE you do the reset. Then, after doing the reset and powering ON the system (With NO graphics card installed. Yes, you will not have a display) shut down by holding down the power button. Then do a hard reset AGAIN, but this time reinstall the graphics card before you power the system back on.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Then, download a new copy of your Nvidia installer, making CERTAIN that you are downloading the "game ready" driver version, not the Studio or other versions. Also, make sure it is the MOST recent driver version, found here:

https://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us

Then, try the installation again.

When you did the installation did you use the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller or did you simply choose the clean install option from the Nvidia installer? It matters, they are not the same process.
 

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