[SOLVED] NVME SSD taking long time to boot

BaylissLad

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Apr 8, 2016
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Alright guys

I recently upgraded my PC (parts list here) and I'm having some issues with my boot time. (over 30 seconds).

Here are some details that may help:
  • To get go from power off to the windows lock screen, it takes around 33 seconds (sometimes a little more).
  • According to Task Manager, my 'Last BIOS time' was 26.0 seconds
  • My NVME drive is plugged into the PCIe 3.0 x4 slot in my motherboard, with the other slot being gen 4.
  • My only other hard drive is plugged into the first sata port.
  • I am not running the newest bios version (few months off), as I'm not 100% sure on why that would affect my boot speed.
  • I am running the latest Crucial drivers for my NVME SSD.
I've heard that over 10 seconds for an NVME drive is slow, but even if I could get it to around 15 seconds, that would be a big improvement (since I'm pretty sure my old samsung 850 evo booted quicker than my new nvme drive does).

Any help would be appreciated.
 
Some things to check.

1. Missing components.
If, for example you have installed a dvd drive but do not have a dvd inserted, the start process waits a bit to determine that there is no device there.
If you have a second sata device ship but no device attached.
checking a lan adapter if you have no lan cable attached.

2. Bios wait delay.
There is usually a setting to delay startup so you can enter the bios.
Too quick, like 1 second and you may not be quick enough to get into the bios.
Too long like 10 seconds and you wait.

3. Some bios settings will do a ram test before startup. You can disable that.

Normally a clean startup requires windows to load individual components.
Setting fast boot on will copy the contents of ram to a drive when you complete a clean boot.
Thereafter, it will read that file into ram instead of the slower process of loading individual components.

4. By default, you may be loading a lot of startup junk.
Task manager will show you the startup tasks. Disable what you really do not need.

5. single thread core performance counts.

Regardless, I suggest that you use sleep to ram(no hibernate)
That will put your pc and monitor into a low power state, not much different from a full power off.
sleep/wake will be only a matter of seconds.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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"I've heard that over 10 seconds for an NVME drive is slow "

Completely incorrect.

Many things can influence boot time.
The other HDD in there, what software you have in StartUp, the BIOS time.

Your time spent in the BIOS was apparently 26 seconds. That leaves 7 seconds with the NVMe drive and Windows.
The type of drive you have has no effect on whatever the BIOS is doing...that initial 26 seconds.
 

BaylissLad

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Apr 8, 2016
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"I've heard that over 10 seconds for an NVME drive is slow "

Completely incorrect.

Many things can influence boot time.
The other HDD in there, what software you have in StartUp, the BIOS time.

Your time spent in the BIOS was apparently 26 seconds. That leaves 7 seconds with the NVMe drive and Windows.
The type of drive you have has no effect on whatever the BIOS is doing...that initial 26 seconds.
I only have Lightshot (a screenshot tool) set to open on startup.

Should I move this to the Motherboards section then? I'd still like to get it sorted even if its not an issue with my storage
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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I only have Lightshot (a screenshot tool) set to open on startup.

Should I move this to the Motherboards section then? I'd still like to get it sorted even if its not an issue with my storage
Lightshot. And your AV tool of choice.

Anyway...that "26.0 seconds" has nothing to do with your drive.
Look through the BIOS settings and see what it is doing in there.
 

BaylissLad

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Apr 8, 2016
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Lightshot. And your AV tool of choice.

Anyway...that "26.0 seconds" has nothing to do with your drive.
Look through the BIOS settings and see what it is doing in there.
I don't have any AV at the moment.

As i am no expert, I cannot see anything wrong in the BIOS, simply telling me to look in there isn't very helpful.
 

Joakim Agren

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Sep 5, 2019
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In Windows start search for msinfo this should bring up the Systems information app click that one and then check what it says under BIOS mode. Does it say legacy or UEFI?
 

Carl2

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Jan 31, 2010
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Right now I'm using my old HP, I'm using the standard old SSD, it automatically set up everything and is using UFEI, it came with a hard drive that I never used, I get a 10 sec startup A more recient build I have with a 6 core Intel CPU has a NVME, it was a pain setting it up but I finally got it right, it is set to ultra fast boot, start up time is 7 sec.
 

BaylissLad

Reputable
Apr 8, 2016
62
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4,645
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Right now I'm using my old HP, I'm using the standard old SSD, it automatically set up everything and is using UFEI, it came with a hard drive that I never used, I get a 10 sec startup A more recient build I have with a 6 core Intel CPU has a NVME, it was a pain setting it up but I finally got it right, it is set to ultra fast boot, start up time is 7 sec.
Unfortunately I cannot find anything relating to Fast boot in my BIOS.

Yes that is correct! Next thing to try is to disconnect anything to the computer including keyboard and mouse and just leave the monitor connected. Do this solve the issue?
Nope no luck doing that
 
Some things to check.

1. Missing components.
If, for example you have installed a dvd drive but do not have a dvd inserted, the start process waits a bit to determine that there is no device there.
If you have a second sata device ship but no device attached.
checking a lan adapter if you have no lan cable attached.

2. Bios wait delay.
There is usually a setting to delay startup so you can enter the bios.
Too quick, like 1 second and you may not be quick enough to get into the bios.
Too long like 10 seconds and you wait.

3. Some bios settings will do a ram test before startup. You can disable that.

Normally a clean startup requires windows to load individual components.
Setting fast boot on will copy the contents of ram to a drive when you complete a clean boot.
Thereafter, it will read that file into ram instead of the slower process of loading individual components.

4. By default, you may be loading a lot of startup junk.
Task manager will show you the startup tasks. Disable what you really do not need.

5. single thread core performance counts.

Regardless, I suggest that you use sleep to ram(no hibernate)
That will put your pc and monitor into a low power state, not much different from a full power off.
sleep/wake will be only a matter of seconds.
 

BaylissLad

Reputable
Apr 8, 2016
62
1
4,645
1
Some things to check.

1. Missing components.
If, for example you have installed a dvd drive but do not have a dvd inserted, the start process waits a bit to determine that there is no device there.
If you have a second sata device ship but no device attached.
checking a lan adapter if you have no lan cable attached.

2. Bios wait delay.
There is usually a setting to delay startup so you can enter the bios.
Too quick, like 1 second and you may not be quick enough to get into the bios.
Too long like 10 seconds and you wait.

3. Some bios settings will do a ram test before startup. You can disable that.

Normally a clean startup requires windows to load individual components.
Setting fast boot on will copy the contents of ram to a drive when you complete a clean boot.
Thereafter, it will read that file into ram instead of the slower process of loading individual components.

4. By default, you may be loading a lot of startup junk.
Task manager will show you the startup tasks. Disable what you really do not need.

5. single thread core performance counts.

Regardless, I suggest that you use sleep to ram(no hibernate)
That will put your pc and monitor into a low power state, not much different from a full power off.
sleep/wake will be only a matter of seconds.
Appreciate this, my replies are below:

1. From what I can see, I have disabled everything that it would check for, that I don't have. I did this after I created my post, and it knocked around 5 seconds off of my BIOS time (eg disabling all other options in the boot order. and WiFi stuff)

2. I cannot find a setting that matches this description

3. I have seen this elsewhere but cannot find how to do it with my motherboard.

4. I only have Kaspersky AV and Lightshot set to launch on start up (kaspersky installed AFTER my og post, so that isn't causing issues).

Thanks
 
Mar 2, 2021
1
0
10
0
Alright guys

I recently upgraded my PC (parts list here) and I'm having some issues with my boot time. (over 30 seconds).

Here are some details that may help:
  • To get go from power off to the windows lock screen, it takes around 33 seconds (sometimes a little more).
  • According to Task Manager, my 'Last BIOS time' was 26.0 seconds
  • My NVME drive is plugged into the PCIe 3.0 x4 slot in my motherboard, with the other slot being gen 4.
  • My only other hard drive is plugged into the first sata port.
  • I am not running the newest bios version (few months off), as I'm not 100% sure on why that would affect my boot speed.
  • I am running the latest Crucial drivers for my NVME SSD.
I've heard that over 10 seconds for an NVME drive is slow, but even if I could get it to around 15 seconds, that would be a big improvement (since I'm pretty sure my old samsung 850 evo booted quicker than my new nvme drive does).

Any help would be appreciated.
I hope you no longer need this answer being that it's two years later and all but I figured I might add something to the best solution in the event that this might help someone else.

Most motherboards share bandwidth between the sata and PCIe lanes that the NVMe drives occupy. These are different based on the motherboard model, and I find that the highest tier boards, $800 plus, tend to not have this quirk. But this is likely to apply to most of us humans. I did not know about this for the longest time because this is not information readily available outside of the small print but you can find it somewhere in the user manual. For example, my motherboard, the gigabyte Aorus Ultra x570 board, it's about $300, it has three PCIe slots to support three NVMe drives, A, B, C. I don't remember the exact details but let's say that I have five available SATA lanes, 1 -5. Slot B shares bandwidth with lanes 1 and 2. Slot C with lane 5. Slot A is free on my board. So, I use slot A for my boot drive.

Some boards do not have any free slots and some boards don't share slots at all, though I believe that the latter is few and far between.

Again, I hope you do not need this but I also hope that this manages to help someone else in the future.
 

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