Question PC from storage started on first attempt, has not ever since?

Dec 13, 2020
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Let me start by saying I am entirely new to Gaming PC's and as such may slip up a bit with the correct terminology or questions.

As the title suggests, this PC has been in storage for many months prior to me receiving it and it started first time when checked.

Sidenote: the PC was garage stored and in a fairly cool environment before being brought into a warm environment to test.

Now the PC will not start at all.

I assumed it may be the power supply so tested the pinouts with a multimeter and all appeared to be correct. The motherboard appears to have power available to it as the power button is illuminated, but on pressing this button the motherboard nor PSU kick into life.

I have since removed all components and laid them out flat. I only have the PSU connected to the MB and CPU, and the CPU fan connected to the MB.

I noticed when the cpu is disconnected, the MB tries to start but stops in <1s, contrast to the CPU connected which literally does nothing. (I understand this may prove nothing but included just for the facts)

I have checked that CPU is seated correctly and that there are no bents pins in the socket, all appear to be fine. I have applied new thermal paste to the CPU whilst in there.

Is there anymore checks I can try to narrow down the hardware which maybe causing my issue?

MB - MSI Z97 gaming 7
CPU - intel I7 4790k
PSU - cooler master G750M
GPU - evga gtx 970

I apologise if this comes across as a bit rudimentary, but like I say I'm very fresh to this. I will answer any questions you have to my best ability.

TIA and thanks for reading.
 
If the computer was in the cold, brought into a warm and humid enviro and not allowed to fully warm up before starting you may have shorted something due to condensation.

A mobo will not "start" without the CPU, particularly of this generation. Without another computer of a similar generation, using DDR3 and/or with a compatible socket motherboard it will be very hard to diagnose. Might be worthwhile to inquire of repair locations, if worth that possible bill to you.
 
Reactions: ChairOfTheB
Dec 13, 2020
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Thanks for the sharp reply.

Just to add to your last point, would you say this still has some life in it if I were to upgrade certain parts?
 
TBH I would not "spend money" to do a specific upgrade to that system with an unknown failure. You can purchase a brand new Ryzen 3, motherboard, and faster DDR4 RAM for sub $300 (when in stock) that will perform about the same AND has an upgrade path.

IME, keep the PSU if testing good, keep the GPU as a stop gap and go new.
 
Reactions: ChairOfTheB
Dec 12, 2020
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Late to replying, just wanted to echo part of what punkncat said. Upgrading anything with an unknown failure can be throwing money away and it sounds likely a short is what occurred. If you manage to get another setup available that uses the same RAM or, less likely, CPU then you could use the known good computer to test parts from the one you had in storage. Without that setup it would most likely be in your best interest to take it to a repair shop, since throwing parts at it is just a gamble and can be expensive if you aren't really lucky early on.
 

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