Question PC won't boot up with case, works without the case.

Aug 15, 2019
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My PC won't boot up when everything is assembled, the error it shows is 'usb device over current status detected' and shuts down after 15 seconds.
There is mild shock when I touch the PSU, the motherboard and the thumbscrews on my PC.
I decided to disassemble my PC and try to boot it. I removed everything, and kept my PSU, motherboard and my hard disk with windows on it on my table connected, and it worked properly, no problems at all, could even play games with normal FPS.
So I assembled it again, and it showed that error again with the mood shocks. I tried a few things to find out the problem or know if and where a short is.
It happened out of nowhere, I've used this PC for 4 years.
  1. Removed all the screws on the motherboard that attach it to the case.
  2. Removed various equipments one by one, all the fans, the DVD Drive, hard disks.
  3. Unscrewed the PSU from the case
  4. Removed the GPU.
I can't find what the problem is here.
My specs are
Asus H97 Pro Gamer Motherboard
Cooler Master B600 600W PSU
Intel i7 4790K
Sapphire AMD Radeon Dual-X OC Edition R9 270X 4GB GPU
G.Skill DDR3 2x4 8GB RAM
 
Aug 15, 2019
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10
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What if you disconnect all the USB ports at the MB?

"There is mild shock when I touch the PSU, "
I would check that the case is grounded.
If it is....and you are still getting a shock....then it's you that is charged up and it won't hurt anything.
Yeah I tried with just power cord and hdmi cord, still did not boot. And yes the PSU is grounded
 
My suspicion is you forgot the stand-offs. Every case comes with stand-offs used to establish clearance between the case's mounting plate and the back of the mobo. They usually look like round brass pieces about ¼" long with a threaded hole in one end, and a threaded shaft out the other end. There are several common styles of mobos, and the all have some pattern of mounting holes in them, but they can be different. The case mounting plate comes with many holes pre-drilled and threaded for mounting. Some come with the stand-offs separate in a bag and they need to be installed. Others come with the stand-offs already installed in a common layout suited to many but NOT all boards. What is essential is that you make sure that the stand-offs all are placed in case holes so that they match exactly where the MOBO mounting holes are. Ideally there should be a stand-off under every mobo mounting hole, But MORE IMPORTANTLY, there must NEVER be a stand-off under the mobo where there is NO matching mounting hole. And yes, you MUST use the stand-offs. Do NOT fasten the mobo directly to the case mounting plate.

Look carefully at the mobo mounting holes - often three rows of three each. You will see around each one little metal fingers like a flower. The intent is that the screw through this hole into the stand-off will be a Ground point for the mobo. But there should never be a Ground connection anywhere else (except via the power cables). So the stand-offs need to be placed in the case mounting plates' pre-drilled holes just right. Position them as you think they should be to match the mounting hole layout of the mobo. Then temporarily position the mobo in place and check very carefully that they all match exactly, and there is NO stand-off under the mobo where there is no matching hole. When you're sure they are all correct, install the mounting screws.

I once had an odd related incident. I had removed the mobo from the case for something else and re-installed it. Before going further I inspected and found a weird thing. Looking at all the mobo ports that peek through the metal panel on the back of the case, I found one where the springy metal finger of the panel's opening had slipped INSIDE the connector shell instead of contacting the outside. This touched a socket contact creating a short circuit to Ground. I had to remove and re-install the mobo again to get it right.
 
Reactions: TitaniumHawk
Aug 15, 2019
4
0
10
0
My suspicion is you forgot the stand-offs. Every case comes with stand-offs used to establish clearance between the case's mounting plate and the back of the mobo. They usually look like round brass pieces about ¼" long with a threaded hole in one end, and a threaded shaft out the other end. There are several common styles of mobos, and the all have some pattern of mounting holes in them, but they can be different. The case mounting plate comes with many holes pre-drilled and threaded for mounting. Some come with the stand-offs separate in a bag and they need to be installed. Others come with the stand-offs already installed in a common layout suited to many but NOT all boards. What is essential is that you make sure that the stand-offs all are placed in case holes so that they match exactly where the MOBO mounting holes are. Ideally there should be a stand-off under every mobo mounting hole, But MORE IMPORTANTLY, there must NEVER be a stand-off under the mobo where there is NO matching mounting hole. And yes, you MUST use the stand-offs. Do NOT fasten the mobo directly to the case mounting plate.

Look carefully at the mobo mounting holes - often three rows of three each. You will see around each one little metal fingers like a flower. The intent is that the screw through this hole into the stand-off will be a Ground point for the mobo. But there should never be a Ground connection anywhere else (except via the power cables). So the stand-offs need to be placed in the case mounting plates' pre-drilled holes just right. Position them as you think they should be to match the mounting hole layout of the mobo. Then temporarily position the mobo in place and check very carefully that they all match exactly, and there is NO stand-off under the mobo where there is no matching hole. When you're sure they are all correct, install the mounting screws.

I once had an odd related incident. I had removed the mobo from the case for something else and re-installed it. Before going further I inspected and found a weird thing. Looking at all the mobo ports that peek through the metal panel on the back of the case, I found one where the springy metal finger of the panel's opening had slipped INSIDE the connector shell instead of contacting the outside. This touched a socket contact creating a short circuit to Ground. I had to remove and re-install the mobo again to get it right.
Thank you for replying, I shall try this now
 
Aug 15, 2019
4
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10
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I found the problem and it was the front panel's usb 2.0 that was causing the short, I removed the motherboard's connector to it and everything started working properly.
But I still am getting a mild shock when I touch the thumbscrews. And when I plugged in my phone into the front panel's usb 3.0, i got a shock from my phone. Any suggestions?
 

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