Question about two displays and one SSD

KramE01

Commendable
Jul 10, 2016
2
0
1,510
0
Hey all!

It's been around 8 years since I've built a computer and as one might expect, there have been some changes. I admit, I'm a little lost.

I would like to build a dual display workstation for my wife who will be viewing large files in the forms of multi-imaged x-rays and CT Scans.

I'm looking at [urlExt=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128835]GIGABYTE G1 Gaming GA-Z170X-Gaming 7 (rev. 1.0) [/urlExt] because it has a display port and HDMI port.

My question, can I run two monitors at 1920x1080 from the mobo without the need for a discrete graphics card? Further down the rabbit hole, Can I run two cheap 1080p tv's that only have HDMI inputs if I get a display port to HDMI adapter?

Second question is a bit shorter. Is there a benefit to having two SSD's...one to boot, one to store? Or can a single SSD work equally well with no appreciable difference?

Thank you all for your help.


 
You do seem a bit out of date. :)

Firstly, if your wife really wants to view medical imaging files, the 1080 resolution and aspect ratio seems all wrong.

You may want to invest in one higher-resolution monitor with 3:4 or 8:5 aspect ratio. Two monitors at that aspect ratio will still be easily supported my most modern Intel processors. (Skylake series).

You can also save significant money by not getting a motherboard at that specification level. I rarely recommend a B-series or Q-series chipset, but in your case that may be the best solution.
https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z170-H170-H110-B170-Q150-Q170---What-is-the-Difference-635/

Finally, a strange quirk of SSDs is that larger sizes are usually faster, so a larger SSD should perform better than a smaller one.
 

giantbucket

Dignified
BANNED
you can run 2-3 displays from far simpler and cheaper motherboards. sometimes you might simply need to use a DVI-HDMI cable (the protocol is the same just the connectors are different).

you can use as many SSDs as you want - they're no different to regular hard drives, just far FAR more expensive for the space you get.
 
You do seem a bit out of date. :)

Firstly, if your wife really wants to view medical imaging files, the 1080 resolution and aspect ratio seems all wrong.

You may want to invest in one higher-resolution monitor with 3:4 or 8:5 aspect ratio. Two monitors at that aspect ratio will still be easily supported my most modern Intel processors. (Skylake series).

You can also save significant money by not getting a motherboard at that specification level. I rarely recommend a B-series or Q-series chipset, but in your case that may be the best solution.
https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z170-H170-H110-B170-Q150-Q170---What-is-the-Difference-635/

Finally, a strange quirk of SSDs is that larger sizes are usually faster, so a larger SSD should perform better than a smaller one.
 

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