Rolling Back From Windows 10 To Your Older OS Appears Problematic

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wiyosaya

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Is this really any surprise? The free copy of 10 is beginning to sound like marketing drivel that has limitations especially if one wants to upgrade hardware at some point. Want new hardware, buy it, but then pay us for the OS, then you can upgrade hardware as many times as you want.

I plan on upgrading, but since I have disk imaging software, it will be trivial for me to go back.
 
MS needs to clarify this situation. I bought the 3-license Family Pack upgrade of Windows 7 and all 3 computers use the same license code. I upgraded 1 of the 3 to Windows 10 but at this point have no plans to upgrade the other 2. Does this mean that after 30 days the other 2 computers OS will be considered to be not "Genuine"?

If MS does not clarify this within the next 15 days, I'm going back to Windows 7.
 

skit75

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Disk imaging software won't re-activate your old license if Microsoft has invalidated it for use, due to you "upgrading". Isn't that the point of this article?
 

Jalapenoman

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In the ULA Microsoft considers the motherboard the computer. According to their terms, if you replace the motherboard you are supposed to buy a new license.
 

wiyosaya

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Actually, it is not. The article specifically states that you may not be able to reinstall from scratch using installation media, and says nothing about disk imaging software.

Activation codes are stored in your computer based on the hardware configuration that exists when you activate. I have reimaged systems from time to time without hardware changes and have never been asked to reactivate.
I have also upgraded hardware from time to time, and sometimes, depending on the extent of the change, I have had to reactivate.

Once activated, the system will not require reactivation unless there is a significant hardware change.

Besides, if I restore from an image, it will be within a reasonable time.
 

soldier44

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No surprise there, new hardware upgrades come at a cost with every version of Windows over the years except XP I think you were allowed 5 or 6 installs before it became invalid to activate.
 

spectrewind

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Regarding a roll-back after 30 days...
Even if re-activation against M$ servers were somehow blocked, there are a few tricks out there to BACKUP/RESTORE a previous activation token without having to authenticate to M$ activation servers.

It's kind of tedious, but I have used safe-mode/cmd line tools to slip in a previous Win7x64 activation and have a fresh install of Windows accept it.
(not sure about Win8)
 

agentbb007

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I sure am glad I read this article before I updated to Win10. I will be cancelling my upgrade from Win7 Pro to Win 10 right after I post this comment.
I'm going to upgrade to Skylake next month and really don't want to be forced to buy a full version of Win10, since if I understood the article correctly if I upgrade my current system to 10 then buy my Skylake machine next month I wouldn't be allowed to use the Win10 key to do a fresh install on this new Skylake machine. Even-though the my plan is to sell off my current Mobo,CPU,RAM,Case so the license is still only going to be used on 1 machine.
So correct me if I'm wrong but the upgraded Win10 key MS is so generously giving everyone is only good for this current machine hardware you upgrade on. Even if that machine explodes you can't reuse the new Win10 key and your old Win7 key is invalidated and worthless... Hmm no thanks I will keep my current Win7 key active so I can use it on 1 machine at a time, no matter what hardware I may choose to run from month to month. These new "upgrade" win10 keys or whatever they really need to create a name for are VERY limited and USELESS for hardcore enthusiasts who are changing hardware every couple months.
 

agentbb007

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True but it was actually after about 10 installs, and you always had the option of calling customer service and they can provide you an activation code, no limit.
I believe the license agreement is that the license can be active on 1 machine at a time. There is no limit to the number of times you can re-install or swap hardware. Otherwise how would places like Tom's benchmark? Would they have to purchase a new windows license for every new motherboard they test? Naw, I think they have 1 license they can keep using over and over again, on 1 machine, regardless of hardware.
 

chrisloup

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@agentbb007

if you are Using a retail win7, then no issue. if you are using an OEM win7, then you also do not have transfer rights to a new computer and a non same model motherboard upgrade probably violates that and will probably require your windows to be reactivated (although you could always call up microsoft after it fails activation and get it activated hopefully) then do the upgrade.

(considering that OEM is half the price of retail at least where I am, I never buy retail versions, although considering win10 is the last os , maybe i should consider it over a 20 year lifespan)

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-win_upgrade/windows-10-have-a-product-key/0be532bc-99b5-4089-8c7d-5fb03192ae7f?auth=1


If you upgrade from a retail version, it carries the rights of a retail version.
If you upgrade from a OEM version, it carries the rights of a OEM version.
Full version (Retail):
- Includes transfer rights to another computer.
- Doesn't require a previous qualifying version of Windows.
- Expensive
Upgrade version (Retail):
- Includes transfer rights to another computer.
- require a previous qualifying version of Windows.
- Expensive, but cheaper than full version
OEM :
OEM versions of Windows are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:
- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel
- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on
- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard
- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system
What happens if I change my motherboard?
As it pertains to the OEM licenses this will invalidate the Windows 10 upgrade license because it will no longer have a previous base qualifying license which is required for the free upgrade. You will then have to purchase a full retail Windows 10 license. If the base qualifying license (Windows 7 or Windows 8.1) was a full retail version, then yes, you can transfer it.
 

agentbb007

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Ah thanks for the info Chris, that makes more sense. I do have a full retail Win 7 license not an OEM so it sounds like this "upgrade" Win 10 license will have transfer rights to another computer. Guess I can get back in line for the upgrade lol
 

Innocent_Bystander

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After a quick flirt with Windows 10, I find myself back with Ubuntu.

Too many restrictions, inconsistencies, limitations, and the "modern app" paradigm turned out to be complete crap to the point where I ended up using good old desktop programs for everything anyway.

Until MS sorts themselves out, I'll stay away from this one (too).
 

tristanx

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My experience from changing the motherboard from Gigabyte Z77X-D3H to Z97X Gaming 5 confirms it will brick your activation on Windows 8.1.

 

carcharocles_theory

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The whole "some new computers parts require reactivation" part doesn't surprise me, it's just the same "one motherboard = one computer" rule that's been in place since Vista. You can reactivate if you buy the same motherboard model because your old one fried, but if you buy a different model you'll just have to buy a new OS. All three times I've upgraded my motherboard, I've done this, so it doesn't come as a shock that the free windows upgrade is no different.

I should point out that if for some reason you don't want or need anything more expensive than Home Edition and are willing to buy it online, you're much better off price-wise. The Retail version of Windows 10 Home Edition is shockingly cheap for a windows OS, only 20 bucks more than the OEM version. Unless you absolutely cannot afford a price higher than 99 bucks, it's the better deal. As long as you don't share it with other people or put it on multiple machines you can upgrade what you want as many times as you want. That said, it's still 120 dollars you have to buy if you don't already have retail license.
 

tristanx

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Duh, no edit button.

I called Microsoft and they still provide activation key. My windows 8.1 is not retail version. Hopefully it stays this way for Windows 10.
 

Hydrotricithline

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Windows 10 works great.. CRITICAL GAMNING EPIC PEW PEW Moment.. HDD light solid.. 7-15 fps.. apparently windows 10 is doing some major internsive crap in the background.. Can't find what it's doing.. doesn't appear to be auto updates.. IDK. Win7 behaves like this with a backdoor/trojan windows 10.. it comes preinstalled. Roll back? umm yeah.. upgrading to 10 I've had completely be unable to recognize a raid array (even with proper drivers installed) ..
 

Turb0Yoda

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It's some windows process that causes the HDD light to be solid an for the RAM usage to spike...
 

JimmiG

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I also found it funny that you can actually go back to a "Previous preview build of Windos 10" at the Recovery page. Looks like someone forgot to update that before going RTM.
 
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