Question Talk Talk router issues

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Jan 14, 2021
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Correct about the Hub Mac address, tbh i wrote it out properly but it changed all the text to flags.

Map as follows:

ISP>---Modem [D4:77:2B:01:0D:17]>---HUB [44ADB1EE91F5]

HUB port 1>---No device
HUB port 2>---PS4 [70:9E:29:41:6B:B7]
HUB port 3>---Home PC [3C-7C-3F-EE-03-DC]
HUB port 4>---WAVLINK-N [9E:DB:92:8C:99:C8] /WAVLINK-AC [77:24:1B:DF:31]>---Work PC (LAN)/CHROMECAST 2 - [5A:50:0A:DD:8E:F1]

HUB WIFI>---CHROMECAST 1 [06:B1:E4:33:C6:11]
HUB WIFI>---AMAZON FIRE 7
HUB WIFI>---Google home Mini
HUB WIFI>---Xperia 1 [66:15:E3:F8:15:60]
HUB WIFI>---Xperia 5 ii [7A:72:70:36:AD:45]

Can't get Mac address from Google home mini.
Work PC settings not accessible.
Amazon fire in sleeping kids room.

No switches or anything.

The WAVLINK is plugged in via ethernet cable (downstairs to upstairs) then ethernet cable from WAVLINK to work Pc upstairs.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Which specific model Wavlink-N/ AC? ( I am looking for the applicable User Guide/Manual.)

Perhaps...

https://www.wavlink.com/en_us/product/WL-WN575HN2.html

or

https://www.wavlink.com/en_us/product/WL-WN578R2.html

Configured for AP Mode?

Just two LAN ports: one incoming from the router/hub [Port 4] and the other Wavlink [LAN Port] serving the Work PC - correct? Plus wireless service to Chromecast 2. And maybe other wireless devices picking up on it.

Also, is the Wavelink fully and firmly connected into the host wall socket; no wiggle or movement, no wiggle or movement in the incoming Ethernet cable?

On your work PC are you able to run "ipconfig /all". If so, you can get the work PC's MAC and DHCP IP address accordingly. Do check that only one network adapter is enabled on work PC. Since the work PC is using a wired connection from the Wavlink then only wired network adapter should be enabled there.

Yes - fill in the the remaining MAC's but along side each device include the current DHCP IP address being used or, if assigned a Static IP address, include that assigned Static IP address.

You have a very good start on the overall network configuration.

Continual wireless problems suggest, to me, a problem with the wireless configuration. Hopefully not hardware....





 
Jan 14, 2021
19
0
10
0
Which specific model Wavlink-N/ AC? ( I am looking for the applicable User Guide/Manual.)

Perhaps...

https://www.wavlink.com/en_us/product/WL-WN575HN2.html

or

https://www.wavlink.com/en_us/product/WL-WN578R2.html

Configured for AP Mode?

Just two LAN ports: one incoming from the router/hub [Port 4] and the other Wavlink [LAN Port] serving the Work PC - correct? Plus wireless service to Chromecast 2. And maybe other wireless devices picking up on it.

Also, is the Wavelink fully and firmly connected into the host wall socket; no wiggle or movement, no wiggle or movement in the incoming Ethernet cable?

On your work PC are you able to run "ipconfig /all". If so, you can get the work PC's MAC and DHCP IP address accordingly. Do check that only one network adapter is enabled on work PC. Since the work PC is using a wired connection from the Wavlink then only wired network adapter should be enabled there.

Yes - fill in the the remaining MAC's but along side each device include the current DHCP IP address being used or, if assigned a Static IP address, include that assigned Static IP address.

You have a very good start on the overall network configuration.

Continual wireless problems suggest, to me, a problem with the wireless configuration. Hopefully not hardware....





Hi,

It's an AC1200

I'll reply back later with all the IP addresses.

Thanks
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Jan 14, 2021
19
0
10
0
So I've had a bit of a breakthrough!

I decided to skive off work and draw up a network map on AutoCAD with all Mac's and ips.

Couldn't find an IP address on the sky box, was set to 0000. Had a quick Google and entered a standard IP address

https://www.skyuser.co.uk/forum/sky-router/49405-no-internet-skybox.html

Now it works! And the PS4 works too!

Once the kids are in bed I'll check the other devices.

My question is now, is this likely to keep happening?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
For the record: what IP address and subnet mask did you use for the Skybox?

==========

Once the network is established with respect to IP address assignments (Static and DHCP) and the Static IP addresses reserved via device MAC's then all should be well.

My network is a standard public IP addressed network with a Linksys router using 192.168.1.1 (subnet mask 255.255.255.0).

I use static IP addresses for the printer, the NAS, and occasional devices (security camera) requiring a static IP. Those devices are given unused static IP addresses between 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.9. I use the device's MAC to reserve a given static IP address for a given device.

How do I know which static IP addresses are unused? Simple list or a screen capture of the router's tables/lists. (Actually there is a diagram that I screen capture from time to time...)

Your Wavlink should have a static IP address if I have followed everything correctly. And that static IP should be 192.168.1.X where X is not already assigned as a Static IP address. Not 192.168.10.1 as is the apparent default IP.

I also set up an allowed DHCP IP address range. For example 192.168.1.100 through 192.168.1.116. That allows enough address space for my devices and occasional guest devices. (Not so much any more on quest device with socially distancing....)

There are other ways of setting up the overall scheme of things. So there may be other ideas and suggestions (or corrections :) ) forthcoming.

DHCP IP address devices are straightforward. You just configure the device to request a DHCP IP via the router (aka DHCP Server) using the router's IP and the applicable network subnet mask (255.255.255.0 commonly used for home and small offices.

I do restrict the DHCP IP address range. No need to have potentially scores of available DHCP IP addresses when only a dozen or so are actually needed.

Static IPs are just a bit more complicated because you need to tell each device what static IP address it is to use. And the router needs to know what Static IP address goes with each device. The device's MAC (Physical Address) makes the connection between the two. Remember "arp -a"? That is one way of "seeing" what the network is "seeing".

The configuration/setup process is very similar for most networks. It is done via the router's admin screens/pages as well as the devices network adapter screens.

Overall, I think you have most of the work done. Once tuned up - things should roll right along barring bandwidth congestion or rogue/mis-configured devices.

E.g., mis-configured; a device that has both its' wired and wireless adapter enabled. Or a device that was reset and reverted to its default configuration. Those problems become apparent quite quickly. Or someone tried a hack of some sort....

Kids are always trying to reset routers to circumvent parental controls. They also mess around because they think that if they use "Mom's IP address" (or MAC even) then they can game again.

So you are getting it worked out so keep going. Your diagram will help you quickly discover devices that go missing or something new that shows up. And all devices should start showing up in the router's tables or other similar presentation.

Another note. Keep careful track of logins and passwords. Do not continue with the defaults. A reset device will revert to the default values - the router and Wavlink for example. Using default values leaves the network vulnerable and others can get into the network and make changes that you do not want.
 
Reactions: ProblemPete286
Jan 14, 2021
19
0
10
0
For the record: what IP address and subnet mask did you use for the Skybox?

==========

Once the network is established with respect to IP address assignments (Static and DHCP) and the Static IP addresses reserved via device MAC's then all should be well.

My network is a standard public IP addressed network with a Linksys router using 192.168.1.1 (subnet mask 255.255.255.0).

I use static IP addresses for the printer, the NAS, and occasional devices (security camera) requiring a static IP. Those devices are given unused static IP addresses between 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.9. I use the device's MAC to reserve a given static IP address for a given device.

How do I know which static IP addresses are unused? Simple list or a screen capture of the router's tables/lists. (Actually there is a diagram that I screen capture from time to time...)

Your Wavlink should have a static IP address if I have followed everything correctly. And that static IP should be 192.168.1.X where X is not already assigned as a Static IP address. Not 192.168.10.1 as is the apparent default IP.

I also set up an allowed DHCP IP address range. For example 192.168.1.100 through 192.168.1.116. That allows enough address space for my devices and occasional guest devices. (Not so much any more on quest device with socially distancing....)

There are other ways of setting up the overall scheme of things. So there may be other ideas and suggestions (or corrections :) ) forthcoming.

DHCP IP address devices are straightforward. You just configure the device to request a DHCP IP via the router (aka DHCP Server) using the router's IP and the applicable network subnet mask (255.255.255.0 commonly used for home and small offices.

I do restrict the DHCP IP address range. No need to have potentially scores of available DHCP IP addresses when only a dozen or so are actually needed.

Static IPs are just a bit more complicated because you need to tell each device what static IP address it is to use. And the router needs to know what Static IP address goes with each device. The device's MAC (Physical Address) makes the connection between the two. Remember "arp -a"? That is one way of "seeing" what the network is "seeing".

The configuration/setup process is very similar for most networks. It is done via the router's admin screens/pages as well as the devices network adapter screens.

Overall, I think you have most of the work done. Once tuned up - things should roll right along barring bandwidth congestion or rogue/mis-configured devices.

E.g., mis-configured; a device that has both its' wired and wireless adapter enabled. Or a device that was reset and reverted to its default configuration. Those problems become apparent quite quickly. Or someone tried a hack of some sort....

Kids are always trying to reset routers to circumvent parental controls. They also mess around because they think that if they use "Mom's IP address" (or MAC even) then they can game again.

So you are getting it worked out so keep going. Your diagram will help you quickly discover devices that go missing or something new that shows up. And all devices should start showing up in the router's tables or other similar presentation.

Another note. Keep careful track of logins and passwords. Do not continue with the defaults. A reset device will revert to the default values - the router and Wavlink for example. Using default values leaves the network vulnerable and others can get into the network and make changes that you do not want.
Hiya mate,

I used the address posted in the link.

I wanted to thank you for your help, I feel like although it's all beyond me a bit, I know a lot more and understand my network better than before!

Thank you so much for your help!

Ta
 

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