Discussion Various WIndows 7 Activation/Licensing Questions

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
Hello. Can someone tell me how to change how often Windows checks for available updates? Normally, Windows checks for updates once per day. I want to make it check for updates once per hour. I know it's possible, because in the past I changed the settings, and Windows was checking for updates every hour, instead once per day. However, I forgot where the settings are.

One more question. Is it possible to stop forced updates, not to delay them, but to completely stop them?
 

Aeacus

Champion
Ambassador
I know it's possible, because in the past I changed the settings, and Windows was checking for updates every hour, instead once per day.
While it may was possible in the past, but as of current date, it is not possible. Win 10/11 checks updates every 17 to 22 hours on it's own.

But you can check for updates manually on your own. Every hour or even every minute if you so desire.

Is it possible to stop forced updates, not to delay them, but to completely stop them?
Windows 7 - Yes
Windows 8.1 - Yes
Windows 10 - No
Windows 11 - No

Best what you can do, with Windows 10 Pro, is to "pause" the updates up to 35 days. After which, you have to install updates, if you want to pause it again for 35 days.
 

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
Why would you want windows update checking every hour?
It's about installing as many security definitions as possible. There are complex reasons, but i can't explain them, because my English skills aren't good enough.

By the way, I already found out how to do it. If someone else wants to do it, but doesn't know how, here is how:

  1. Press Windows+R
  2. Type "gpedit.msc"
  3. Click on Administrative Templates
  4. Click on Windows Components
  5. Click on Windows Update
  6. Click on Automatic Updates detection frequency, and change the value.
I hope my explanation is helpful.
 

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
If i install Windows 7 on a virtual machine, will it be possible to activate it with a key? If yes, where will the activation key be stored? On physical computers, the activation key will be stored in the motherboard. But what about virtual machines? Virtual machines use virtual components, CPUs, storage devices, motherboards, etc..., are virtual, meaning they are not physical and don't exist, which also means a virtual motherboard doesn't have the physical chip where the BIOS and the key are stored.

How can a key be stored in the motherboard, if the motherboard doesn't exist?

Let's say somehow activation will be successful.

If i change the specification of the virtual machine, will the activation remain?

If i move the virtual computer from the physical computer where the OS installed in the virtual machine was originally activated, will the activation remain?

If i have a physical computer with physical components, install Windows 7 and activate it, but then turn it into .ISO and put it in a virtual machine on another computer, will the activation remain?

Those questions may seem stupid, i'm sorry. I just don't know how VM works, but i want to learn. I would like to use it.
 

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
You can only get a new one when MS publishes one.

Checking every hour does not get you a new one every hour.
Yes... but it will install updates faster than one timer per 22 hours. The idea is to get all updates available as fast as possible, especially the security updates.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,201
11,690
176,090
24,278
Yes, you can run a fully activated Win 7 in a VM.

Yes, you can move that VM to a whole different physical box, and it will still be activated.


A VM is basically a whole PC, encapsulated in software.

VirtualMachines are probably 1/2 the servers on the planet.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
Jun 12, 2015
56,764
4,517
160,690
10,275
You have to Activate it - https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/running-windows-7-in-a-virtual-machine-validation/c8349bcd-6a0e-4742-ae43-963c8d8c6728

I expect the key is stored in the VM itself. in the virtual disk image

If i move the virtual computer from the physical computer where the OS installed in the virtual machine was originally activated, will the activation remain?
I think so as its the disk image that holds the install.

If i have a physical computer with physical components, install Windows 7 and activate it, but then turn it into .ISO and put it in a virtual machine on another computer, will the activation remain?
i don't know about that.
 

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
What are you so scared of that you need to check that often?
The security definitions, the instructions that teach Windows Defender to recognize viruses, should be installed as fast as possible, before a virus have the chance to penetrate the system.

If Windows installs definitions one timer per 22 hours, then during the 22-hours period the computer won't have the latest definitions, meaning it will be more vulnerable. However, if definitions are installed as soon as they are available, this will reduce the time the virus has during which it can attack the system.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,201
11,690
176,090
24,278
The security definitions, the instructions that teach Windows Defender to recognize viruses, should be installed as fast as possible, before a virus have the chance to penetrate the system.

If Windows installs definitions one timer per 22 hours, then during the 22-hours period the computer won't have the latest definitions, meaning it will be more vulnerable. However, if definitions are installed as soon as they are available, this will reduce the time the virus has during which it can attack the system.
Yes, I know what a zero-day is.

What I was asking is why do YOU feel that you would be a victim of such?

And wanting to increase the frequency of checking for security updates for Defender, but at the same time wanting to turn all the other updates OFF?
You do know that those often contain security fixes as well, right?
 
Reactions: TheFlash1300

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
What I was asking is why do YOU feel that you would be a victim of such?
Because there is no 100% guarantee i won't be a victim of a virus attack. As long as the computer is connected to the internet, viruses can penetrate even if i don't download anything and don't use the browser. Having your IP address public is enough for a virus attack to happen.

I have important files on my computer, so i want to minimize the risks of ransomware and things like that.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,201
11,690
176,090
24,278
Because there is no 100% guarantee i won't be a victim of a virus attack. As long as the computer is connected to the internet, viruses can penetrate even if i don't download anything and don't use the browser. Having your IP address public is enough for a virus attack to happen.

I have important files on my computer, so i want to minimize the risks of ransomware and things like that.
Assuming your system is behind a router, and not connected directly to the modem...your PC does not have a "public" IP address. The modem/router does.

And you know the second best way to not worry about ransomware? Have a good backup routine.
In the near impossible case of my system being smacked by ransomware, I'd simply rebuild it from last nights backup. Or worst case, last week.

The first best way is to not click on stupid stuff.



And for checking security updates all the time?
You do realize that there can be a vulnerability that is not yet covered in a security update. In fact, this is how most of them start.
 
Reactions: TheFlash1300

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
Yes, you can run a fully activated Win 7 in a VM.

Yes, you can move that VM to a whole different physical box, and it will still be activated.


A VM is basically a whole PC, encapsulated in software.

VirtualMachines are probably 1/2 the servers on the planet.
You have to Activate it - https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/running-windows-7-in-a-virtual-machine-validation/c8349bcd-6a0e-4742-ae43-963c8d8c6728

I expect the key is stored in the VM itself. in the virtual disk image


I think so as its the disk image that holds the install.


i don't know about that.
Thanks for both answers.

Currently, i have several computers with Windows 7 but its OEM, meaning i cant tranfer the activation from the physical computer to the virtual computer. It seems i need to buy a Retail license for Windows 7. The problem is that Microsoft no longer sells keys for Windows 7. There must be a way to get a key. Can someone tell me how to get a working key? Do i need to contact Microsoft and pay them for activation?

Also, i have several more questions about software running on virtual machines.

From the perspective of software (e.g. a video game, an operating system), is there a difference between running on a virtual machine and running a physical computer that has a physical CPU, physical motherboard, physical storage, etc...?

What is the difference between physical computer components and virtual physical components?

Can software make a difference between running on a physical computer and running on a virtual computer?

If I turn my Windows 7 OS and the Windows 7/XP-compatible apps in it into .ISO file, create a virtual machine on my Windows 10/11 computer, and then put the .ISO file in the virtual machine, will the Windows 7 OS and the apps behave in absolutely the same way as they behave on a physical computer, will they have absolutely the same functionality, will they make any difference between the virtualized environment and the physical environment they were originally written for?

The reason why I want to do this is because I don't know how to make Windows 7 compatible with new hardware by inserting new hardware's drivers into Windows 7. I find it easier to just run Windows 7 and my project on a virtual machine, one day, when the hardware Windows 7 and my project are installed on fails, and there is no more compatible hardware to replace the failed one. Since the project is important to me, I want to be absolutely 100% sure that the OS and the project will be the same after I transfer them from the physical computer to the virtual computer, and they will have the same functionality with preserved originality.

Are virtual computers literally the same as physical computers in terms of functionality?
 

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
Assuming your system is behind a router, and not connected directly to the modem...your PC does not have a "public" IP address. The modem/router does.

And you know the second best way to not worry about ransomware? Have a good backup routine.
In the near impossible case of my system being smacked by ransomware, I'd simply rebuild it from last nights backup. Or worst case, last week.

The first best way is to not click on stupid stuff.



And for checking security updates all the time?
You do realize that there can be a vulnerability that is not yet covered in a security update. In fact, this is how most of them start.
As far as i know, any OS can get viruses by just being connected to the internet, isn't this true?

Yes, i make backups of my important stuff, but not very often.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,201
11,690
176,090
24,278
As far as i know, any OS can get viruses by just being connected to the internet, isn't this true?
Not nearly as much as you might think.
Any publicly accessible system and IP address gets scanned all the time. Every day, all day.
The function of your router and its firewall is to simply throw these away.

Yes, i make backups of my important stuff, but not very often.
Maybe you should change that.

I do full drive backups every night.
A Full image, followed by a series of Incrementals.
Repeat after 30 days.

I can rebuild any individual drive, or the whole system if need be, from any day in the last month.
This applies to a nasty virus, or a physically dead drive, or any other reason.
 
Reactions: TheFlash1300

TheFlash1300

Proper
Mar 15, 2022
277
4
185
0
Not nearly as much as you might think.
Any publicly accessible system and IP address gets scanned all the time. Every day, all day.
The function of your router and its firewall is to simply throw these away.
But what if you use Windows 7? Its firewall is old and no longer good. Around a month ago, i asked a question about security in Windows 7. Someone told me that Windows 7 and XP can get viruses by just being connected to the internet, without the user having to surf, use the browser or download anything. A simple connection is enough for viruses to penetrate.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
156,201
11,690
176,090
24,278
But what if you use Windows 7? Its firewall is old and no longer good. Around a month ago, i asked a question about security in Windows 7. Someone told me that Windows 7 and XP can get viruses by just being connected to the internet, without the user having to surf, use the browser or download anything. A simple connection is enough for viruses to penetrate.
The router firewall.

And it is absolutely true that 7 or XP are more vulnerable than recent versions...they no longer get the same updates.
But it is NOT a case of simply being online, if your system is behind a router. You pretty much need to click on something malicious.

You don't do that, right?
 
Reactions: TheFlash1300

ASK THE COMMUNITY