VRMark: An Early Look At Futuremark’s Virtual Reality Benchmark Tools

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Sakkura

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That's still annoying. When people click on an image, it's generally to make it larger rather than smaller. Yet the first click makes it smaller, and you have to click again to get the full-size image.
 

kcarbotte

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That's still annoying. When people click on an image, it's generally to make it larger rather than smaller. Yet the first click makes it smaller, and you have to click again to get the full-size image.
If I had the power to change that I would in a heartbeat.

 

AMD27

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That's still annoying. When people click on an image, it's generally to make it larger rather than smaller. Yet the first click makes it smaller, and you have to click again to get the full-size image.
Totally agree, this is so annoying and I am wondering how a popular website like tomshardware can't/won't fix this issue!
 

jasonelmore

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so you say amd has better vr but the 980 ti beats all of the cards, but it doesn't count because its more expensive?

lol i like your logic.

both are going to be great, i wouldnt even start recommending hardware until HMD's are available for purchase and Nvidia VR and AMD VR drivers are mature.
 

Gillerer

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so you say amd has better vr but the 980 ti beats all of the cards, but it doesn't count because its more expensive?

lol i like your logic.

both are going to be great, i wouldnt even start recommending hardware until HMD's are available for purchase and Nvidia VR and AMD VR drivers are mature.
AMD also have more expensive cards, but they were not tested. In order to gauge the relative strengths of different GPU architectures, you need to compare GPUs of in similar price brackets. It really doesn't say anything about the architecture if a $700 card performs better than a $300 card.
 

RodioR

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Hey,

I was wondering - if you use only 1 sensor, how do you make sure that 7 ms is not the measurement error? In other words maybe, what is the accuracy of measurement? If it's consistent, but you use only 1 sensor at a time, how do you prove that those 7 ms come from difference between latencies and not from the measurement setup (best proven if used 2 sensors at the same time)?
 

kcarbotte

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I'm not really sure what you mean, but there's no way to use more than one sensor.
The hardware used to test the HMD's that Futuremark provided includes one sensor only. Two sensors would not help, as the sensor takes up the entire area of the lense. Even if I had two sensors, its not possibly to use both at the same time.

 
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