Wan't to overclock, but don't know how.

gogators89

Distinguished
Sep 24, 2009
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18,510
Hi everyone :)

I'm new here and I'm new to overclocking, I know absolutely nothing about it. I've read a few things and I am still stuck. I have an Intel E6400 Dual Core @ 2.13 Ghz and I want to get it to about 3 Ghz. I do not know what I'm doing and I don't want to mess anything up.

Here are my system specs:
OS: Vista Ultimate
Memory: 2 GB
GPU: XFX GeForce 8800GT 633 Mb memory
CPU: Intel E6400 Core 2 Duo @ 2.13 Ghz
Mobo: Intel D946GZIS

I'm not extremely computer savvy so I'm not sure if there is any other information you may need, if so just ask and I will provide. Thanks for any help guys!

 
G

Guest

Guest
Turn up the CPU voltage in your motherboard's BIOS all the way to ensure stability. 2 or more Volts is nothing compared to most household items that are 12Volts. Your CPU will easily handle it. More Volts = More Ghz. Good luck!


 

SpidersWeb

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Aug 19, 2009
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Yeah don't do that haha

First thing first, you need a better CPU cooler than standard, that's always your first port of call. Next is to let us know what spec your RAM is, e.g. DDR400 DDR2-800 DDR2-667 etc etc.

To find out that info, download CPU-Z (search google for a link), run it, and tell us what it says about the memory. When you OC the processor, the memory gets clocked up too, so need to be sure it'll be fine.
 

Sigh.

This should be your first stop.
HOWTO: Overclock C2Q (Quads) and C2D (Duals) - Guide v1.6.1
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/240001-29-howto-overclock-quads-duals-guide

This should be your second stop. You need to know something about thermal management or you can fry your CPU. It's actually kind of difficult to fry a modern CPU, but it is possible.
Core 2 Quad and Duo Temperature Guide
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/221745-29-core-quad-temperature-guide

You should be able to get up around 2.5 GHz. with the stock cooler. For anything higher, you will need better cooling. Here are two under $50 heatsinks that are pretty popular:
Sunbeam
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835207004
Xigmatec Dark Knight
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835233029

They both require a somewhat different approach to applying thermal compound.
Suggestions for applying thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=1&limit=1&limitstart=5

And they are pretty large, so they might not fit inside you case.

Go through the first two threads. Do not do anything until you have a good idea about what you are trying to do. Once you have definite questions (you will, you will :)), come back and ask.

Keep in mind that these are guides, not cookbooks. YMMV. Your Miles May Vary. Because of all the variables, you may not do as well as someone else with a similar system. Or you might do better.

Also, Intel motherboards are not known to be good overclockers.
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Overclocking since 1978 - Z80 (TRS-80) from 1.77 MHz to 2.01 MHz