Question What’s the difference between 50a & 60a power chokes?

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Deleted member 2808222

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I’m trying to compare two motherboards and decide which one to buy. Asrock X570 Extreme4 & Asrock X570 Pro4. So one of these has 50a power chokes and the other 60a chokes. Could someone explain what the difference is?

Also, Asrock call these power chokes but I’m not sure if they have a different name like power stages or something.
 

TheJoker2020

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Oct 13, 2020
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I’m trying to compare two motherboards and decide which one to buy. Asrock X570 Extreme4 & Asrock X570 Pro4. So one of these has 50a power chokes and the other 60a chokes. Could someone explain what the difference is?

Also, Asrock call these power chokes but I’m not sure if they have a different name like power stages or something.
The obvious answer is 10A...

TBH, it depends as much on the number of chokes and whether they run on doublers etc, also it depends on what CPU you are going to be using and whether you are going to be overclocking hard or not.

This covers everything you could possibly want to know about the power delivery of these boards and how they compare by a competitive memory overclocker, hardcore nerd and electrical engineer.

Enjoy :)

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG3DYE2uAys
 
I’m trying to compare two motherboards and decide which one to buy. Asrock X570 Extreme4 & Asrock X570 Pro4. So one of these has 50a power chokes and the other 60a chokes. Could someone explain what the difference is?

Also, Asrock call these power chokes but I’m not sure if they have a different name like power stages or something.
Power chokes and power stages are different parts of the VRM circuit. A power stage combines the lo-side FET, hi-side FET and driver in a single package for efficiency.

The choke is in series with each VRM phase current path so the total current flow must pass through it when that phase is 'on'. Simply put (perhaps overly so) VRM phases turn on and off one at a time to conduct current so only one works at a time. That makes a higher current rating 'better'.

So a 60A choke is rated to pass 10A greater current than a 50A. But some VRM designs use two chokes in parallel on the phase, 1/2 the current flows in each choke. So just knowing that isn't enough to say anything conclusively.
 
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