Question Will i7 8700 bottleneck a RTX 2080?

staurosstoikos

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Jun 23, 2018
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I'm going to build a new pc. Firstly, I saw i7 9700k but then i realized that the 8700 is 100$ less. I checked the benchmarks and there wasn't a big difference, but will the 8700 bottleneck?

The build:
CPU:Intel Core i7-8700 Box
MOBO:Asus Rog Strix Z390-E Gaming
RAM:G.Skill TridentZ RGB 16GB DDR4-3200MHz
GPU:MSI GeForce RTX 2080 8GB Gaming X Trio
CPU Cooling:Enermax Liqfusion
Case:Enermax Saberay
PSU:Corsair RMx Series RM750x (2018)
HDD:Seagate Barracuda 2TB
SSD(M.2):Samsung 970 Evo Plus 250GB

In that budget, should i go to ryzen?
 
Last edited:

PC Tailor

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Herald
"Bottlenecks" is a very overused term and doesn't reflect reality. It completely depends on the application.

Generally speaking, you could say, no it wouldn't.

But a word of warning:
  • Benchmarks rarely reflect what you get in reality. For example NVME M2 SSDs are substantially better in benchmarks, in real life however, virtually no difference between the 2 in application.
  • Bottlenecks are completely application dependant, and the bottleneck of your system if dynamic, in some applications your CPU will be the bottleneck, in other applications, your GPU might be the bottleneck.
  • On a side note - 250GB of SSD will fill up very quickly.
 

nicholas70

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May 15, 2016
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I think they are supposed to go on sale in early July so you don't have long to wait, and for the type of system you want to build holding out for the 3000s to drop could end up getting you a lot more bang for your buck.
 

nicholas70

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May 15, 2016
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Not sure about overseas, but prices are supposed to be good. I think the flagship 12c/24t is supposed to be $500 usd, so clearly it is meant to compete directly with the 9900k. I forget the prices for the other cpus in the lineup but there's plenty on the internet already about likely pricing.
 
Is that a locked i7 8700? Since you're getting a Z board and a decent enough cooling solution, you may want to look for an i7 8700K instead?

Anyway, to answer the opening question: yes it will in some capacity. Should you care? Hell no.

Out of all the things that will take performance from your system, I'm willing to say the CPU is not going to be the worse one. And since you're eyeing a high end Intel platform, eyeing the Ry2700X is a side-grade or even a downgrade for some games. If you're willing to spend money around building an i7 8700K and above, then don't mind with the current lineup from AMD. As for waiting for the next CPUs... Can you wait until the 7th of July when they officially release them? Hopefully, there's going to be plenty reviews to check and compare, but I can tell you right now that if you build around the i7 8700K (or higher from Intel), you won't regret it when the new AMD stuff lands. Even if it's faster, that's just how the tech world goes!

So, in short, if you can wait for the new stuff, wait. Otherwise, you won't really miss much if you hi mid-high end with Intel right now for games.

Cheers!
 

alceryes

Distinguished
"Bottlenecks" is a very overused term and doesn't reflect reality. It completely depends on the application.

Generally speaking, you could say, no it wouldn't.

But a word of warning:
  • Benchmarks rarely reflect what you get in reality. For example NVME M2 SSDs are substantially better in benchmarks, in real life however, virtually no difference between the 2 in application.
  • Bottlenecks are completely application dependant, and the bottleneck of your system if dynamic, in some applications your CPU will be the bottleneck, in other applications, your GPU might be the bottleneck.
  • On a side note - 250GB of SSD will fill up very quickly.
Completely agree. The term 'bottleneck' should stay with your favorite cola.

In synthetic benchmarks you may see some bottlenecking with a large difference in relative performance between CPU and GPU. In games you may see a little bottlenecking with a large difference in relative performance between CPU and GPU. But, each application/game is different. So, as long as the GPU or CPU can perform it's set task for that application/game you won't have a problem.

If you want to reference those tube vids that show any kind of large difference, remember that it's impossible to go through a scene twice and experience the exact same polys, textures, AI, lighting, etc. It WILL be different, unless it's a demo scene that programmaticly does the exact same thing. I also have questions on whether these vids were done with any kind of scientific accuracy (run 50 times, drop the high and low 10%, average the rest, etc.). Some vid creators may have even set out to show a bottleneck difference and cherry-picked vids to support this idea.
 

hftvhftv

Honorable
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May 26, 2014
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Short answer: No.
Long answer: Nooo.
Also you can get away without buying an expensive Z390 board if you don't plan on buying an 8700K. The ASRock H370M Pro4 I built with and it's a great inexpensive motherboard.
 
Jun 3, 2019
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Im honestly of the idea that the 100 dollar difference is well worth it.Yes there is a mariginal difference in performance on paper, but looking forward, and with Ray tracing opening up the gaming world, I think in a year or two you will be glad you spent that 100 extra. Do you need it, probably not now... but will you?
IMHO, if you are willing to spent for the high end, absolutely go with a "k" version for unlocking, and only go with the lower processor if you really feel you have to.

side note: a 250gb SSD isn't very big. I too am partial to Samsung storage, but honestly a WD black or equivalent is going to bring results that are likely unrecognizable to you in practice, and you can likely get 1TB for less than the Samsung, while really not sacrificing on quality imo.
 

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