[SOLVED] Advice for ubuntu disk partitioning

Mar 18, 2021
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Here's the story. I have been using the Windows system for years, with only a couple of years in Linux (and WSL). I have installed Windows 10 on my SSD. Thanks to the fact that I have 8GB of RAM and I use 2GB of it for AMD's Integrated Graphics, now I want to have a dual boot system with Ubuntu 21.04 on it. Not a VM nor WSL.

Here are my drives:
  1. VGen M.2 NVMe 256GB (100GB free)
  2. Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM010 1TB 7200RPM SATA (400GB free)
So here's the problem. I only have less than 100GB of space on SSD to spare for the Linux, and I should put the rest of it on my HDD. And I didn't know how I should manage the Linux partitions.

From what I know, I should put my boot system on SSD for better boot-up time. Also, what I understand from JayzTwoCents' video, an SSD with full capacity is not healthy. And it could lead to shortens the SSD's lifespan faster (CMIIW).

So here are the questions:
  1. How much should I spare for the Linux on my SSD? (is 30GB enough?)
  2. Because I want to use my SSD as little as possible, how should I manage the partitioning? (e.g., swap, /boot, and /tmp on SSD and put the rest on HDD.)
  3. I think I would want to use the NTFS partition for /home so I can access any data inside it from Windows. How should I manage that?
  4. Should I put the swap on my SSD? (is 6GB enough? Because I always use 1.5x of my RAM capacity before)
  5. I haven't done any partitioning before, is it possible to split the system only into two partitions so they can share the free space? (e.g., /boot and /tmp on SSD partition 3, and everything else on HDD Partition 2)
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Just for the sake of relevance, you should have at least 50% of your SSD empty in order for it to optimally work. IMHO, you should factor in that even after a dual boot setup, you should yet have 50% of drive space free. In your case, you can't meet that, not with the dual boot and all things installed. You can run the SSD to it's brim but then performance from it starts to drop off.

If your platform allows, you should get another SSD, and have that as a Linux drive, since you have Windows 10 installed prior on another drive, it would still be a dual boot, just on two physical drives.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Just for the sake of relevance, you should have at least 50% of your SSD empty in order for it to optimally work. IMHO, you should factor in that even after a dual boot setup, you should yet have 50% of drive space free. In your case, you can't meet that, not with the dual boot and all things installed. You can run the SSD to it's brim but then performance from it starts to drop off.

If your platform allows, you should get another SSD, and have that as a Linux drive, since you have Windows 10 installed prior on another drive, it would still be a dual boot, just on two physical drives.
 
Mar 18, 2021
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10
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Just for the sake of relevance, you should have at least 50% of your SSD empty in order for it to optimally work. IMHO, you should factor in that even after a dual boot setup, you should yet have 50% of drive space free. In your case, you can't meet that, not with the dual boot and all things installed. You can run the SSD to it's brim but then performance from it starts to drop off.

If your platform allows, you should get another SSD, and have that as a Linux drive, since you have Windows 10 installed prior on another drive, it would still be a dual boot, just on two physical drives.
So I had to put the whole bunch of Linux to my HDD. Thank you then.

Also, what if someday I could afford to have more SSD? Is there any advice? (same question except for the NTFS part)
 
Just for the sake of relevance, you should have at least 50% of your SSD empty in order for it to optimally work.
If it wasn't for that blue badge under your avatar, I'd use other words than "Complete nonsense"...

To OP: Providing that you have backup of both drives (that is, you can restore your system in case something goes wrong), you can install Linux and having root and home on different drives. As for whether 30gb are enough for Linux root - it depends what you'll be installing there. It's more than enough for text-based system, or for "standard" GUI with "standard" browser / email apps.
 
Mar 18, 2021
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As for whether 30gb are enough for Linux root - it depends what you'll be installing there. It's more than enough for text-based system, or for "standard" GUI with "standard" browser / email apps.
As a newcomer, I think I would need more than that. After reconsidering, I should go back to the WSL or just go and put it on my HDD. It's pretty hard for me to work on a text-based system and everything in the standard condition for a long-term environment. Therefore I will need some more space.

I have done some short research. Based on a Promax blog post, I should keep at least 25% space free on my NVMe drive, which in my case is around 59.25GB. I have more than enough if I set a 30GB limitation, but I am concerned about the 50% free space and the long-term use of both OS because this is a family-shared device. I will take both advice.

If I go with the first plan, where I take 30GB from my SSD, I have 70GB left. I only have 10GB left to use if I stick to the 25% minimum free space. I didn't think it would be enough for at least 2-year usage.
 

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