Question Asus Zephyrus M High CPU & GPU Temps of 90c

ilikegirls

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Jan 26, 2009
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Hello!

Thanks in advance for your help :)

I've recently had to sell my gaming Desktop due to a sudden move related to health issues. My brother helped me out and I got an Asus Zephyrus M with an i7 8750H, 16GB RAM, GTX 1070 (None Max-Q) and have been enjoying it so far! My desktop had a GTX 1060, so I'm not complaining at all (without my brothers help, I would have been lucky to get a laptop with a GTX 1050).

Fast forward a week, and started noticing that after long gaming sessions the performance would drop slightly. Nothing absurd, but I'd lose about 10% fps over the course of a gaming session. I recently did a test for thermals and found the CPU hitting 90c with the GPU not so far behind it. I've looked up a video (Video) that suggests repasting the laptop and applying an undervolt to the CPU to help mitigate this situation. It's very important to me that the laptop stays as healthy as possible as I'm not in the states which most likely means any damage to the laptop could cost me my only computer. I have built computers in the past, and I have the experience, but due to the circumstances here, I'm so nervous I don't think I can even attempt cracking open the laptop (warranty voided or not).

So for now, the only 2 games I really play are League and Overwatch which are thankfully super easy to run! I dropped the game settings to low / med and capped the framerate at 144 (display limit). This makes the GPU and CPU not work as hard and keeps my temps around 70c. This is a temporary solution, so I'm hoping to find a more longterm solution soon. Aside from undervolting and repasting, any suggestions to keep the laptop cool would be welcome and I guess the most important question here, is 90c too high; meaning, will it cause damage?
 

mtracy1991

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Nov 6, 2018
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Hello!

Thanks in advance for your help :)

I've recently had to sell my gaming Desktop due to a sudden move related to health issues. My brother helped me out and I got an Asus Zephyrus M with an i7 8750H, 16GB RAM, GTX 1070 (None Max-Q) and have been enjoying it so far! My desktop had a GTX 1060, so I'm not complaining at all (without my brothers help, I would have been lucky to get a laptop with a GTX 1050).

Fast forward a week, and started noticing that after long gaming sessions the performance would drop slightly. Nothing absurd, but I'd lose about 10% fps over the course of a gaming session. I recently did a test for thermals and found the CPU hitting 90c with the GPU not so far behind it. I've looked up a video (Video) that suggests repasting the laptop and applying an undervolt to the CPU to help mitigate this situation. It's very important to me that the laptop stays as healthy as possible as I'm not in the states which most likely means any damage to the laptop could cost me my only computer. I have built computers in the past, and I have the experience, but due to the circumstances here, I'm so nervous I don't think I can even attempt cracking open the laptop (warranty voided or not).

So for now, the only 2 games I really play are League and Overwatch which are thankfully super easy to run! I dropped the game settings to low / med and capped the framerate at 144 (display limit). This makes the GPU and CPU not work as hard and keeps my temps around 70c. This is a temporary solution, so I'm hoping to find a more longterm solution soon. Aside from undervolting and repasting, any suggestions to keep the laptop cool would be welcome and I guess the most important question here, is 90c too high; meaning, will it cause damage?
One suggestion would be purchasing one of the laptop cooling pads that would assist in keeping it cool.
 
First off: That's a nice laptop you got there. (y)

Second: Besides keeping the laptop on a hard, flat surface, vents unobstructed, there's not a lot that can be done externally. A cooling pad might help, but oftentimes they're placebos (everyone's mileage varies). An undervolt is probably your next safest route, just start small and work in small increments until you find a good balance between stability and temps.

Everything else to mitigate temps will pretty much be working with the internals, and it's understandable to be nervous about that. Try to make any modifications inside a last resort for the sake of your warranty - although OEMs are technically not supposed to force you out of it simply over modifications (but they're not liable for you damaging anything).

Lastly (but importantly): All the best to you while you go through said health issues. :)
 

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