Question Best low light DSLR for under 750usd/670Euro

markaabo

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Apr 27, 2016
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I recently had my car robed with all my camera gear, i previously had a Sony SLT-A58 and a lot of gear for it. but almost all the gear got stolen only have a tripod and little gorilla tripod left so im in-need of a new camera and since all my gear got stolen i can start from scratch so i wanted to hear if somebody in here has any recommendations for a good low light DSLR camera for under 750usd/670Euro

I was happy with my Sony SLT-A58 only thing is i didnt like how bad it was at low light, only like requirement i have is it has to be a DSLR with interchangeable lens, has to be a mirrored camera, and be a little newer than my old SLT-A58 so after like 2015/2016
 

cin19

Titan
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Best low light DSLR
You should ask best low light DSLR lens, and it depends on what subject(s) you are goning to shot, sport? landscape? something else?
For low light photography, you need the tripod + flashlight, or higher ISO. If without tripod+ flashlight, the faster the lens is considered to be, ofc the best camera you can afford will help too.
 

jankerson

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You should ask best low light DSLR lens, and it depends on what subject(s) you are goning to shot, sport? landscape? something else?
For low light photography, you need the tripod + flashlight, or higher ISO. If without tripod+ flashlight, the faster the lens is considered to be, ofc the best camera you can afford will help too.

Absolutely.

A good f2.8 lens or faster combined with a high quality camera body is the ticket. Reason why I said the D7500, has the same sensor as the D500.

The actual lens needed will depend on what they are going to use it for however and all the good fast high quality lenses are NOT cheap.
 

TehPenguin

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Assuming you already have a good lens(or have a separate budget for that) - look for a camera with the biggest sensor. Full Frame, preferably. The greater the sensor size the better(less intensive) the shot noise becomes. To put it in simple words: more area - more light - less noise.

AFAIK the Sony A850 is the only Full Frame that would fit your budget but I might be wrong. Please do some research on that before buying, I only did a quick google search.

But if it's too much of a stretch just go for APS-C (or any equivalent) but definitely not lower. As others have said - a good lens is key. It is better to buy a cheaper camera and a good lens than the other way around.

Your old camera had an APS-C sized sensor, but it was also a camera introduced in 2013 so any newer camera should outperform it. With that said, though, it also depends what kind of lenses you've been using with it.

If I were to put it in numbers then it's like a 80-20, Lens-To-Body-Ratio. If we talk about image quality.

A good body is a like a good tool - it makes it easier to achieve the effect you want.

A good lens makes it possible to even capture it. Perspective, depth of field and sharpness - all that is almost exclusively dictated by how good the glass is and what kind of glass it is.

And since we're talking about lenses. If you buy a camera with a CROP sensor, you should also either be using lenses that are meant for crop sensors(like canons EF-S series) OR use a Speed Booster. A lens built for a full frame camera will basically "waste" light as it will project it onto a larger area that the smaller sensor cannot cover. A speed booster focuses that light onto a smaller area which results in a better SNR.

The last thing I will mention, at least in this post, is that image stabilization has a tremendous impact on low light performance, when hand held, so keep that in mind when choosing either a camera with IBIS or just a lens with a good IS.
 
Last edited:

jankerson

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Assuming you already have a good lens(or have a separate budget for that) - look for a camera with the biggest sensor. Full Frame, preferably. The greater the sensor size the better(less intensive) the shot noise becomes. To put it in simple words: more area - more light - less noise.

AFAIK the Sony A850 is the only Full Frame that would fit your budget but I might be wrong. Please do some research on that before buying, I only did a quick google search.

But if it's too much of a stretch just go for APS-C (or any equivalent) but definitely not lower. As others have said - a good lens is key. It is better to buy a cheaper camera and a good lens than the other way around.

Your old camera had an APS-C sized sensor, but it was also a camera introduced in 2013 so any newer camera should outperform it. With that said, though, it also depends what kind of lenses you've been using with it.

If I were to put it in numbers then it's like a 80-20, Lens-To-Body-Ratio. If we talk about image quality.

A good body is a like a good tool - it makes it easier to achieve the effect you want.

A good lens makes it possible to even capture it. Perspective, depth of field and sharpness - all that is almost exclusively dictated by how good the glass is and what kind of glass it is.

And since we're talking about lenses. If you buy a camera with a CROP sensor, you should also either be using lenses that are meant for crop sensors(like canons EF-S series) OR use a Speed Booster. A lens built for a full frame camera will basically "waste" light as it will project it onto a larger area that the smaller sensor cannot cover. A speed booster focuses that light onto a smaller area which results in a better SNR.

The last thing I will mention, at least in this post, is that image stabilization has a tremendous impact on low light performance, when hand held, so keep that in mind when choosing either a camera with IBIS or just a lens with a good IS.

The main issue here is that the budget is WAAAAAAY to low to start with, even for used bodies.

The Nikon D750 is still the best low light body available today, it's legendary for it's low light performance and that even on sale is more than twice his budget.

Take a D750 and mount a F2.8 or faster lens on it and that is the ticket, the D750 basically can see in the dark, take a fast F1.8 or F1.4 lens on it and you won't need a flash for almost anything.
 

TehPenguin

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May 12, 2016
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The main issue here is that the budget is WAAAAAAY to low to start with, even for used bodies.

The Nikon D750 is still the best low light body available today, it's legendary for it's low light performance and that even on sale is more than twice his budget.

Take a D750 and mount a F2.8 or faster lens on it and that is the ticket, the D750 basically can see in the dark, take a fast F1.8 or F1.4 lens on it and you won't need a flash for almost anything.
For a combo? Yeah it's low. For body only? Should be fine.
 

cooldex

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Aug 1, 2012
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naw the best low light camera is A7s II but it has a low megapixel count (12.2mp) but iso 102,400 and very usable up til 64,000 then you get a little noise. but still the boss at low light even the a7s I
 

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