Question Can I run a 144Hz monitor at 75Hz?

May 31, 2020
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I want to buy a new computer nowadays and I want to buy a new display too. The thing is I want to buy an RTX 2060 and it won't give me 144+ FPS on all games. So I wanted to buy a 75Hz monitor. The problem is I can't find a well built, sturdy 75Hz IPS monitor with height adjustment(it's quite important for me) and 1 ms response time. So what I've been wondering is can I make a 144Hz monitor run at 75Hz. I mean I don't know if changing it in advanced display settings in Windows change it in games and all too. I can't really afford a G-Sync display. If there is a way that I can make a 144Hz monitor run at 75Hz I am probably going to go with ViewSonic XG2405 otherwise I'm going to go with Asus 248QG, which is a little bit expensive but supports G-Sync, or AOC G2590VXQ, which is a 75Hz monitor with a TN panel and no height adjustment but is way cheaper than the Asus monitor.
 
May 31, 2020
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Thank you very much. Also I know that RTX 2060 supports freesync but I can't really be sure that it will work flawlessly.
 
I wouldn't bother locking it at 75Hz. An RTX 2060 would probably be a bit overkill for the majority of today's games at 1080p if limited to that refresh rate. The only benefit to locking it at 75Hz would be if you planned to enable V-sync, and didn't want your frames dipping below the maximum refresh rate. But with newer adaptive sync technologies, that shouldn't be needed.

Also, that Asus screen is only "G-Sync Compatible", meaning it too is just a FreeSync screen, though one that's been verified by Nvidia to meet their arbitrary standards for G-Sync. The vast majority of FreeSync displays should support adaptive sync just as well on Nvidia's cards as they do on AMD's, though they currently need to be connected via a DisplayPort connection and have "G-Sync" manually turned on in Nvidia's control panel to make the feature work.

I did notice someone mentioned that to get the "1ms" response time on that Viewsonic screen, you need to enabled a certain mode that apparently strobes the backlight, which locks the brightness to a relatively low setting. And if it's anything like most other backlight strobing modes, that also means it likely disables adaptive sync and locks the refresh rate to its maximum setting, making that option not particularly well-suited to your needs.

Of course, it's questionable how much benefit a "1ms" pixel response time actually provides. At 144Hz, each frame will be on screen for nearly 7ms. And at 75Hz, each frame would be on screen for over 13ms. A lower refresh rate can reduce ghosting somewhat, but so long as pixel transitions remain within that refresh window, that shouldn't be much of a problem.
 
May 31, 2020
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Thank you for your answer.

Of course, it's questionable how much benefit a "1ms" pixel response time actually provides. At 144Hz, each frame will be on screen for nearly 7ms. And at 75Hz, each frame would be on screen for over 13ms. A lower refresh rate can reduce ghosting somewhat, but so long as pixel transitions remain within that refresh window, that shouldn't be much of a problem.
Assuming that I understood you correctly, would a 5ms grey to grey monitor be enough for gaming at even 144Hz?
 
I would say, in general, sure.

However, manufacturers don't always necessarily report their response times the exact same way, and the number they provide is an average. Some pixel transitions between different brightness levels can exceed that amount, while others will be lower.

For example, with VA screens, pixel transitions from black to other colors can often be significantly slower than the other transitions, in some cases multiple frames in length, which can potentially result in a bit of smearing in dark parts of a scene when they are in motion. Of course, VA also allows for black pixels to be darker than with IPS or TN panels, resulting in significantly higher contrast than those other panel types, so there's a tradeoff there.

Of course, this can also be affected by "overdrive", which is used to counter slower transitions, but can potentially result in "inverse ghosting" when turned up too high. So a manufacturer might in some cases turn overdrive up to get faster response time numbers, but a lower setting with less artifacts might be better for actual use.

So, it's not a clear-cut case of one manufacturer-provided number being better than another, and it's often necessary to consult a professional review that goes into a detailed examination of response times, though those don't exist for many screens. In general though, even with response times that don't always fit within a 7ms window, a 144Hz screen will still generally be an improvement over a 75Hz one, particularly if you are pushing high frame rates in a particular game.
 
May 31, 2020
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Okay, thanks a lot. Actually you really helped decide. I am probably going to go with Viewsonic XG2405. I read and watched reviews of that display and it really stands out. Thanks a lot again.
 

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